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imported_Ziggy
2005-Mar-27, 09:42 PM
In Feb. 2004, Russian scientists published the resaults of experiments they had been doing between July 14th-August 10th 2003 at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research using the U400 Cyclotron in Russia. In a collaboration with American scientists, they claimed to have for a few billionths of a second stabalized four nuceli of a new super-heavy element. It had the infamous atomic number 115, and a atomic weight of 288. A melting point of 1740 degrees Celius and an extreamly high density of 31.5g/cm2. It was given the temporary name "Ununpentium."

While the claims have not been confirmed, does anyone know anything else about Uup 115? Please, leave out for whole Bob Lazar thing! ;)

antoniseb
2005-Mar-27, 11:49 PM
A quick websearch turns up this site:
http://www.beyondweird.com/element115.html

Which starts off with this sentence:

Element 115, the key to understanding how the ultra-secret "Black World" has created aircraft capable of manipulating gravity and space/time, has been identified

Be careful, there's a lot of junk out there diluting the truth.

imported_Ziggy
2005-Mar-28, 12:09 AM
Ununpentium is said to be the begining of an "Island of Stability" among the super-heavies. Is there any research being done to find more stable super-heavy elements?

StarLab
2005-Mar-28, 05:36 AM
Zig, I don't think they exist unless we create them... :unsure:

Ola D.
2005-Mar-28, 03:58 PM
Here's a link explaining the experiment and results with some details:
Ununpentium - 115 (http://www.apsidium.com/elements/115.htm)

And yes, the Bob Lazar thing is totally nonesense.

John L
2005-Mar-28, 05:08 PM
I heard 114 was the start of the island of stability...

j0seph
2005-Mar-28, 06:07 PM
Originally posted by StarLab@Mar 28 2005, 05:36 AM
Zig, I don't think they exist unless we create them... :unsure:
yah, how is it an natural element if we created it?

Ola D.
2005-Mar-29, 08:17 PM
Actually, elements such as ununpentium-115 and ununquadium-114 do not occur naturally; Uup was produced by bombarding Americium and Calcium and has only lasted for fractions of a second before decaying to ununtrium-113.


I heard 114 was the start of the island of stability
Yes, isotopes of neutron number of 184 with matching atomic numbers of 114, 120 and 126.

imported_Ziggy
2005-Mar-29, 08:24 PM
I know that elements like 113, 114, 115, and 118 don't occur naturally, there created in the lab. What I ment by my question was "Is any research going on to create in the lab stable super-heavies?"

John L
2005-Mar-29, 10:55 PM
That's really what all this is about, Ziggy. They're trying to find the right combination of atoms to slam together so that the resulting heavy nuclie is one of the stable isotopes predicted by theory.

There are no naturally occurring elements on the Earth heavier than Uranium. Everything heavier is man-made.

wstevenbrown
2005-Mar-29, 11:29 PM
It's like trying to accomplish love with violence, tho-- a very tricky proposition.

The actual stability of the rest state may not be observable due to the violence of the formation event. S

imported_alan
2005-Mar-30, 05:08 AM
Originally posted by Ziggy@Mar 27 2005, 09:42 PM
In Feb. 2004, Russian scientists published the resaults of experiments they had been doing between July 14th-August 10th 2003 at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research using the U400 Cyclotron in Russia. In a collaboration with American scientists, they claimed to have for a few billionths of a second stabalized four nuceli of a new super-heavy element. It had the infamous atomic number 115, and a atomic weight of 288. A melting point of 1740 degrees Celius and an extreamly high density of 31.5g/cm2. It was given the temporary name "Ununpentium."

While the claims have not been confirmed, does anyone know anything else about Uup 115? Please, leave out for whole Bob Lazar thing! ;)
uh, how did they determine the melting point and density from four atoms?

VanderL
2005-Mar-31, 08:17 PM
Ununpentium? Sounds like an April Fool's joke (Dutch or Flamish would do it) :D

Cheers.

antoniseb
2005-Mar-31, 08:30 PM
Originally posted by alan@Mar 30 2005, 05:08 AM
uh, how did they determine the melting point and density from four atoms?
The stuff I've seen implies that these are calculated values based on models of how something with that many electrons should behave. Since it has a halflife of milliseconds, it is not going to be something you can get a solid bar of and heat in an oven, watching to see when it melts.

Matthew
2005-Apr-01, 11:16 AM
In regards to what is "natural", I'd be thinking elements, or at least ions of hundreads of atomic elements would be created in the extreme conditions of a supernova. However most of these particles would likely have extrememly short half-lives. With only about a hundred elements or so stable enough to last for a couple of hundred million years in substantial quantitiies (in this I am refering to the elelments we are most familiar with).

So just because we haven't seen it in space, and only in a lab does not mean it cannot be created in space.