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Fraser
2005-Mar-28, 05:09 PM
SUMMARY: NASA's Deep Impact has completed the commissioning phase of its mission - mission controllers have verified that all the spacecraft's instruments and systems are functioning. It has now entered the cruise phase, which will continue from now until about 60 days before its encounter with Comet Tempel 1 on July 4, 2005. Deep Impact's flyby spacecraft has four data collectors which will watch as the impactor spacecraft smashes into the comet, carving out a stadium-sized hole, and giving astronomers some of the best comet photos ever taken.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/deep_impact_cruise.html)

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protostar
2005-Mar-28, 06:44 PM
I hope the scientists took into consideration that the impact could produce some kind of gasous fumes and that black holes "feed" off of these. With the new discovery of large almost grey matter found in our own galaxy, I hope these "black holes" don't wake up!

antoniseb
2005-Mar-28, 07:10 PM
Originally posted by protostar@Mar 28 2005, 06:44 PM
I hope the scientists took into consideration that the impact could produce some kind of gasous fumes and that black holes "feed" off of these. With the new discovery of large almost grey matter found in our own galaxy, I hope these "black holes" don't wake up!
Hi protostar,

I haven't heard of this discovery of large almost grey matter found in our own galaxy. Perhaps you can provide a URL.

However, I would like to point out that it is impossible for even a single atom of the gas released by Deep Impact to find its way to feed a black hole, unless a black hole passes through our inner solar system, in which case that puff of gas is the least of our worries.

sk_astroman
2005-Mar-29, 02:58 PM
HI

CAN ANY ONE GIVE ME THE ANSWER FOR THIS

"the bake-out heating of the spacecraft's High Resolution Instrument to remove normal residual moisture from its barrel"

THIS IS THE SENTENCE GIVEN IN THIS ARTICLE. MY QUESTION IS HOW THE MOISTURE IS REMOVED FROM THE SPACECRAFT BY HEATING.WILL IT AFFECT OTHER INSTRUMENTS?

pls, let me know the technology or give me an URL.

-astroman

antoniseb
2005-Mar-29, 04:16 PM
Originally posted by sk_astroman@Mar 29 2005, 02:58 PM
CAN ANY ONE GIVE ME THE ANSWER FOR THIS
Some probes developed frost on the camera lenses. The first such one that I knew about was Stardust. The early images from stardust were terrible. Someone figured out that they could turn on some onboard heaters now and a gain and get the frost to sublimate off of the lenses. It worked. Now it's a standard practice. The actual "bake' temperature is not that high, and does not damage the other insturments.