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Fraser
2005-Apr-26, 06:12 PM
SUMMARY: Since arriving at the Columbia Hills, Spirit, one of the Mars Exploration Rovers, has encountered some mysterious phenomena. The rover’s right front “arthritic” wheel that plagued Spirit’s 2-mile trek across the plains is now suddenly working perfectly and the once dust-covered solar panels whose power output was cut in half have now been miraculously wiped clean. But the biggest mystery of the Columbia Hills may lie in the angled rock outcrops that Spirit has found in the vicinity of “Larry’s Lookout” on Husband Hill.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/spirit_bedrock_columbia.html)

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

antoniseb
2005-Apr-26, 07:49 PM
This is interesting. I'm looking forward to the eventual press conference when they reveal their best guess as to how these hills were formed.

TuTone
2005-Apr-26, 08:22 PM
I just think volcanic activity & wind blown dust just formed & clumped together, thus creating a hill. ^_^

antoniseb
2005-Apr-26, 08:32 PM
Originally posted by TuTone@Apr 26 2005, 08:22 PM
I just think volcanic activity & wind blown dust just formed & clumped together, thus creating a hill.
That could be. What confuses me about that scenario is why there aren't similar hills all around there instead of the flat crater bottom.

Greg
2005-Apr-27, 01:44 AM
This is very interesting stuff. Hills are generally formed on Earth when areas of more solid stone weather more slowly than the surrounding terrain, by volcanic outflows, or when continents collide and buckle sedimentary rock into hills and valleys. My first thought is that these hills were formed by the impact that generated the gusev crater itself. That impact could have generated enough energy to buckle nearby terrain into hills. Subsequent lava flows could have been randomly dispersed from the interior or generated by the impact itself filling in the valleys and leaving the hills as outcrops over the basalt plain generated from the volcanic activity. The fact that this outcrop is inclined with respect to the horizon and runs paralell to other outcrops of exposed stone suggests it is old sedimentary rock buckled into inclined strata (hills) by some subsequent event (impact?) with the the basalt plain filling in later from volcanic activity.

TuTone
2005-Apr-27, 01:50 AM
Originally posted by antoniseb+Apr 26 2005, 08:32 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (antoniseb @ Apr 26 2005, 08:32 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-TuTone@Apr 26 2005, 08:22 PM
I just think volcanic activity & wind blown dust just formed & clumped together, thus creating a hill.
That could be. What confuses me about that scenario is why there aren&#39;t similar hills all around there instead of the flat crater bottom. [/b][/quote]
Possibly just coincidence. ^_^

Guest
2005-Apr-27, 09:13 AM
Maybe we&#39;re doomed to die a painful and disgusting death. Ya&#39; know those aliens. If you don&#39;t concede to their vicious and impossible demands; they’ll eat you alive ;)

burmese
2005-Apr-27, 12:54 PM
I think a secondary impact within Gusev is the best candidate at the moment. I can&#39;t imagine them being created at the time of the creation of Gusev.

Eric Vaxxine
2005-Apr-27, 02:01 PM
Have a look at these two very different rocks.

http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/all...EP2280L2M1.HTML (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/all/2/p/464/2P167556866EFFA9HEP2280L2M1.HTML)

Nick4
2005-Apr-27, 03:25 PM
I think that we could have fond bedrock. we can see old oceans and maby it found like a little streem or river by mistake.