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Fraser
2005-Apr-28, 06:17 PM
SUMMARY: NASA's Deep Impact took its first photograph of its cometary target, Comet Temple 1, which it will smash into in just 10 weeks. Deep Impact took this image when it was 64 million kilometers (39.7 million miles) away. While it's just a few grainy pixels today, it will be the best view ever taken of a comet when the spacecraft streaks past on July 4. It will release the 1-m impactor shortly before reaching the comet, which will smash into it and carve out a crater the size of a football field.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/deep_impact_target_view.html)

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

Guest
2005-Apr-28, 06:25 PM
great picture, this is a very good mission

om@umr.edu
2005-Apr-28, 06:33 PM
I look forward to the the impact event.

I hope it provides useful information.

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om

lswinford
2005-Apr-28, 08:00 PM
I thought the camera was still messed up on this probe, or was it another that had the fog or oil smears?

John L
2005-Apr-28, 08:29 PM
I think it was only one of the science cameras that had imaging issues, but Deep Impact has more than one camera.

Also, my name is on the impactor, as well as the names of most of the members of my family. That is if NASA really included them on the probe...

Guest
2005-Apr-28, 08:42 PM
What are the relative velocities of the comet and the probe? How fast is the probe moving toward the comet? How fast is the comet moving toward the probe?

Are we going to get a traffic ticket for this hit and run? :D

John L
2005-Apr-28, 08:48 PM
As the story notes:


Our goal is to impact a one-meter long (39-inch) spacecraft into about a 6.5-kilometer wide (4-mile) comet that is bearing down on it at 10.2 kilometers per second (6.3 miles per second), while both are 133.6 million kilometers (83 million miles) away from Earth.

TuTone
2005-Apr-28, 11:31 PM
Wow, that's fast, but I'm thinking Deep Impact is just going to make a *POOF* instead of a **KABAMBOOM KABUUSHH** with that comet. ^_^

TuTone
2005-Apr-28, 11:32 PM
Deep Impact doesn't have any explosives attached to it, does it?
Its just a metal box flying into a comet at high speeds, right?

Duane
2005-Apr-29, 07:10 PM
Originally posted by TuTone@Apr 28 2005, 04:32 PM
Deep Impact doesn't have any explosives attached to it, does it?
Its just a metal box flying into a comet at high speeds, right?
Right.

Keith Nealy
2005-Apr-29, 11:19 PM
Originally posted by John L@Apr 28 2005, 08:48 PM
As the story notes:


Our goal is to impact a one-meter long (39-inch) spacecraft into about a 6.5-kilometer wide (4-mile) comet that is bearing down on it at 10.2 kilometers per second (6.3 miles per second), while both are 133.6 million kilometers (83 million miles) away from Earth.
Yes, but I was wondering about their individual velocity vectors. What's the speed of the probe, and what's the speed of the comet (relative to any common point, I don't care).

Is the probe simply putting itself in the path of the comet, or is it a head on collision or what?