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Fraser
2005-Jun-02, 04:57 PM
SUMMARY: An international team of researchers have developed a computer program that simulates the growth and expansion of the Universe after the Big Bang, including the formation of galaxies, clusters and quasars. The "Millennium Simulation" used 10 billion virtual particles of matter, and traced their movements in a 2 billion light-year cube of space as the Universe evolved. This simulated area contained 20 million virtual galaxies, and accounted for dark energy expanding the Universe, cold dark matter, and regular matter.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/simulation_whole_universe.html)

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

StarLab
2005-Jun-02, 09:16 PM
Hmm...any evidence of a fractal pattern?

ChrisColes
2005-Jun-02, 10:11 PM
Within a year the big bang will be a totally discredited theory and a lot of people will have egg on their faces.

Nereid
2005-Jun-02, 10:16 PM
Originally posted by ChrisColes@Jun 2 2005, 10:11 PM
Within a year the big bang will be a totally discredited theory and a lot of people will have egg on their faces.
Welcome to UT ChrisColes!

That's a pretty specific prediction - a rarity among those who are less than impressed with the state of the consensus model of cosmology (a.k.a. 'the big bang theory').

Would you care to share with us why the BBT has only a year left to live?

antoniseb
2005-Jun-02, 10:44 PM
Originally posted by ChrisColes@Jun 2 2005, 10:11 PM
Within a year the big bang will be a totally discredited theory and a lot of people will have egg on their faces.
Interesting... why egg?

Greg
2005-Jun-03, 01:54 AM
I was wondering if the authors divulged some specifics about by what mechanism their early SMBHs were forming in their simulation?

Matthew
2005-Jun-03, 07:56 AM
They only tied up the computers for a month. Get a new supercomputer and run it for 6 months so we can get some more accurate data. There were only 10 billion bits of matter.

iantresman
2005-Jun-03, 11:43 AM
Originally posted by fraser@Jun 2 2005, 05:57 PM
SUMMARY: An international team of researchers have developed a computer program that simulates the growth and expansion of the Universe after the Big Bang, including the formation of galaxies, clusters and quasars.
But the article says nothing about their starting assumptions. What kinds of particles? What forces were assumed to be acting on those particles?

Ian

amalia
2005-Jun-05, 06:06 AM
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Well in my opinion, i think this is a big step for the world...can yu imagine only in virtual world...if this is done why we cant excel the velocity of light???

ChrisColes
2005-Jun-05, 09:00 AM
Nereid, and all others,

I am not sure that I can answer the question you pose because I would be breaking the rules of Universe Today, for which I have great respect. I will try to do so without breaking the rules.

Decades ago, when I first heard about Big Bang Theory, I immediately rejected the whole idea, but it was only during the end of the last century that I slowly came to realise I could describe an alternative. As you all know, it is always fun to describe your own ideas when you get together with some friends, as I did during 2002 at a conference in San Francisco. I was challenged by a scientist to get my ideas into publication, but the publisher I approached told me that they could not publish as I destroyed everything. As I have friends that have published their own books, I set up my own publishing company which is based in Washington DC. So I published my theories and no one would give me even one word of publicity. So although I had handed out a fair number of the book to radio, TV and major newspapers and magazines, I had no sales.

Over the last two years I have re-written the book and am about to publish a much more detailed description of my own theories as a second edition.

Since the first edition came out, (a copy was sent to Stephen Hawking), Hawking has abandoned his Theory of Everything and admitted black holes can empty themselves, (a major tenet of my book), Scientific American published "The Extraordinary Death of Ordinary Stars" by Bruce Balick et.al. July 2004 edition. Balick ends with a statement to the effect that: "Discovery is often disruptive. It clears out old niches and prepares the way for big (and often disorienting) leaps forward." I have an image of a planetary nebula by Bruce Balick in my first edition, as also the second edition. Bruce Balick has seen what I have written.

In the second edition I have taken up the public challenge from NASA to describe a new model for what we see when we look at Whirlpool Galaxy. NASA has had a copy of the first edition in its hands for some time and has seen an early draft of the second edition. They have just published two images to celebrate the 15th anniversary of Hubble, one of The Whirlpool Galaxy and the other of The Eagle Nebula, both of which are essential to the full understanding of what has happened to the Whirlpool Galaxy as I describe it. I cannot believe that they would do that knowing that I was about to describe something they disagreed with.


I describe the silly mistakes made with regard to the singularity, which I show is impossible to create. I describe a completely new evolution for the black hole and how it evolves into a quasar. I show what gravity really is and how everything we see in space is quite different from what is conventionally understood today. I have even filed a patent application for the control of gravity.

I hope to have the second edition out by Christmas.

I can say with certainty; the big bang never happened. The Universe is older and larger than we have imaginations to conceive.

antoniseb
2005-Jun-05, 02:38 PM
Originally posted by ChrisColes@Jun 5 2005, 09:00 AM
I will try to do so without breaking the rules.
Thanks for making the effort to stay within the rules. If you're still a participating member here when your second edition comes out, we'll be happy to bend the rules and let you put up one post that links to the promotional website.

Nereid
2005-Jun-06, 10:57 PM
Originally posted by iantresman+Jun 3 2005, 11:43 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (iantresman @ Jun 3 2005, 11:43 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-fraser@Jun 2 2005, 05:57 PM
SUMMARY: An international team of researchers have developed a computer program that simulates the growth and expansion of the Universe after the Big Bang, including the formation of galaxies, clusters and quasars.
But the article says nothing about their starting assumptions. What kinds of particles? What forces were assumed to be acting on those particles?

Ian [/b][/quote]
Ian,

If you click on the PPARC PR link (at the bottom of the UT story), you will find a wealth of other links; following those - and maybe emailing the people listed - you may find answers to your questions.

Perhaps the surest way to get an answer is to find the preprint(s) in ArXiV; they&#39;ll spell it all out (although it may take some time for you to &#39;decode&#39; it).

Kind Regards
Nereid