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Fraser
2005-Jun-02, 05:28 PM
SUMMARY: NASA announced today that it's pressing forward with a new mission to Jupiter called Juno, which will launch no later than 2010. This will be the second of NASA's New Frontiers Programs (the New Horizons Pluto mission will be the first). The $700 million spacecraft will travel to Jupiter, and then orbit the giant planet searching for an ice-rock core, determine the amounts of water and ammonia present in its atmosphere and study its winds and magnetic field.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/juno_moves_forward.html)

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

antoniseb
2005-Jun-02, 08:56 PM
I'm glad there's some mission to Jupiter in the books. A Jupiter polar orbit mission seems like a reasonable choice, but I'm curious as to how they'll look for a rocky icy core.

damienpaul
2005-Jun-02, 09:32 PM
yes, how are they to conduct the search? It'd be totally awesome to learn more about the poles of taht great planet

TuTone
2005-Jun-02, 09:44 PM
We need to send some type of bot to land on Jupiter so we can check out the rapid temperture changes & hurricanes. I bet its a crazy place down there.

dave_f
2005-Jun-03, 01:11 AM
Originally posted by TuTone@Jun 2 2005, 04:44 PM
We need to send some type of bot to land on Jupiter so we can check out the rapid temperture changes & hurricanes. I bet its a crazy place down there.
That might be possible. Well, "landing" is out of the question because there's no definable surface of Jupiter, though a few probes have already been thrown down into its atmosphere in the past few decades. It would have to be a floating or flying robot of some kind to be able to last even a few hours. I sort of suspect the floating variety of probes will last longer in Jupiter's atmosphere. It might be a bit turbulent down there to establish stable aerodynamics for a plane-type vehicle.

Carolyn Porco
2005-Jun-03, 03:10 PM
Originally posted by fraser@Jun 2 2005, 05:28 PM



I am glad to see that NASA intends to follow the recommendations of the planetary science community as outlined in the Solar System Decadal Survey report of a few years ago. As a community-wide survey, that report recommended a return to Jupiter as one of the core missions of the next decade necessary to address some of the most fundamental questions facing us in understanding the origin and evolution of the solar system. My sincere hope is that the Jupiter mission does not suffer inordinate delays or ultimate cancellation because of lack of backing or funding brought about by the Moon/Mars Initiative. This is a great concern to all of us engaged in robotic exploration of the solar system.

On a different note, the image that has been run with this article has been given the wrong attribution. It is a large mosaic of images taken by Cassini, not Galileo, and the proper attribution is NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute.

Carolyn Porco
Cassini Imaging Team Leader
Vice-Chairperson, Steering Committee, SS Decadal Survey

om@umr.edu
2005-Jun-04, 10:58 PM
Originally posted by Carolyn Porco@Jun 3 2005, 03:10 PM
I am glad to see that NASA intends to follow the recommendations of the planetary science community as outlined in the Solar System Decadal Survey report of a few years ago. As a community-wide survey, that report recommended a return to Jupiter as one of the core missions of the next decade necessary to address some of the most fundamental questions facing us in understanding the origin and evolution of the solar system.

Carolyn Porco
Cassini Imaging Team Leader
Vice-Chairperson, Steering Committee, SS Decadal Survey
Hi, Carolyn.

I agree that "a return to Jupiter" is "necessary to address some of the most fundamental questions facing us in understanding the origin and evolution of the solar system."

I hope they will have a good mass spectrometer on board and "scrubbers" to remove hydrocarbons so we can get a better measure of the xenon isotope ratios in Jupiter.

Xenon isotope data from the Galileo mission were of low quality and badly contaminated.

However, Galileo data seemed to confirm that the link of Xe-136 with primordial helium, seen on the microscopic scale of meteorite minerals, also extends to the planetary scale that separates the He-rich outer planets like Jupiter from the He-poor inner planets like Earth and Mars.

After correcting for contamination the Galileo data yielded a value of Xe-136/Xe-134 = (1.04 +/- 0.06) in Jupiter. By comparison the xenon in air has Xe-136/Xe-134 = 0.85 and the xenon in the solar wind has Xe-136/Xe-134 = 0.80.

"A return to Jupiter" has the potential to address one of the most fundamental questions facing us in understanding the origin and evolution of the solar system: Did the material that formed the outer planets like Jupiter ever mix with the material that formed the Sun and the inner planets ?

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om

antoniseb
2005-Jun-05, 01:59 AM
Originally posted by om@umr.edu@Jun 4 2005, 10:58 PM
Xenon isotope data from the Galileo mission were of low quality and badly contaminated.
Hmmm. This is the first I've heard you mention this.

BTW Carolyn Porco is a scientist with the Cassini team, and was posting (as a guest) in part to point out that UT had mis-attributed one of her teams fantastic images to the Galileo spacecraft. I'm guessing that she's not a regular reader, but was tipped off by a friend or co-worker.

Concerning Juno, it doesn't appear that it will have an atmospheric probe. What are you proposing that it should sample and do mass spectrometry on? Wouldn't measurements made of atoms (ions) in the magnetosphere be a sample with a different meaning than what you are looking for?

Moseley
2005-Jun-05, 11:24 AM
I also applaud the return to Jupiter - much to learn there.
I suspect all members would like to join me in congratulating Carolyn Porco and her team on the wonderful Cassini mission results.

om@umr.edu
2005-Jun-05, 12:35 PM
Originally posted by antoniseb+Jun 5 2005, 01:59 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (antoniseb @ Jun 5 2005, 01:59 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-om@umr.edu@Jun 4 2005, 10:58 PM
Xenon isotope data from the Galileo mission were of low quality and badly contaminated.
1. Hmmm. This is the first I&#39;ve heard you mention this.

Concerning Juno, it doesn&#39;t appear that it will have an atmospheric probe.

2. What are you proposing that it should sample and do mass spectrometry on? Wouldn&#39;t measurements made of atoms (ions) in the magnetosphere be a sample with a different meaning than what you are looking for? [/b][/quote]
1. Perhaps I failed to point out that a paper published in 1983 predicted that the Galileo probe would find excess Xe-136 in Jupiter. [See: "Solar abundance of the elements", Meteoritics 18 (1983) p. 220].

That prediction was based on the link between primordial He and excess Xe-136 observed in meteorites.

The Galileo PIs would not release the data so we could see if their measurements confirmed or falsified the prediction, probably because of embarassment over the low quality of the data.

Finally in 1998 Dr. Daniel Goldin ordered the immediate release of the data in response to my public request to him at the AAS meeting in Washington, DC. His reply was caught on tape by a C-SPAN camera [C-SPAN tape 98-01-07-22-1, Purdue U. Public Affairs Video Archives, # 98526].

Isotope abundance measurements typically have an uncertainity of about 0.1-1.0%. The xenon isotope data from the Galileo mission had an uncertainity of about 6% - yielding Xe-136/Xe-134 = (1.04 +/- 0.06) in Jupiter.

However, even this low quality data could distinguish Jupiter&#39;s xenon from the xenon in the inner part of the solar system:

Xe-136/Xe-134 = 1.04 (+/- 0.06) in Jupiter
Xe-136/Xe-134 = 0.85 (Earth, Mars)
Xe-136/Xe-134 = 0.80 (Solar Wind)
Xe-136/Xe-134 = 1.04 in xenon with primordial He in meteorites

2. Give us a good set of xenon isotope measurements from anywhere on Jupiter, preferably its atmosphere but even its magnetosphere if that is all that will be sampled. Xenon has 9 stable isotopes. Mass spectrometers can identify and subtract out physical processes that have altered isotope ratios in order to see the isotopic composition of Jupiter&#39;s primordial xenon.

The news release says:

"The mission will conduct an in-depth study of the giant planet."

". . . place a spacecraft in a polar orbit around Jupiter"

". . . determine the amount of global water and ammonia present in the atmosphere"

". . . study convection and deep wind profiles in the atmosphere"

". . . and explore the polar magnetosphere".

It goes on the say that:

"At the end of the preliminary design study, the mission must pass a confirmation review that will address significant schedule, technical and cost risks before being confirmed for the development phase."

Knowing whether or not elements from the inner and outer parts of the solar system ever mixed has enough scientific merit to qualify as a technical reason for design modification if that was not taken into account in the preliminary design.

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om

wstevenbrown
2005-Jun-05, 12:56 PM
Attempting a ball-of-yarn polar orbit thru the strongest magnetic field in the SS is very... courageous. One is faced with choices regarding accessibility of sensors to data vs. armoring and hardening of data processing/transmission equipment. I hope they can pull it off. S

suntrack2
2005-Jun-05, 02:30 PM
its a great news that scientist are looking at jupiter after mars attempts. jupiter is a great reserviour of unknown things, jupiter is acting a pivotal role in the solar system apart from sun, but its effects are not studied yet, but this new jupiter mission will defenetly reach to a outcome which we are expecting today.


sunil