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Fraser
2005-Jun-15, 06:53 PM
SUMMARY: Many of the Earth's volcanic rocks might have come from melted asteroids, according to researchers from the UK's Open University. The scientists have discovered that many early asteroids were quite volcanic and would have had large magma oceans. These asteroids would have become layered with lighter rock forming near the surface while denser rocks were deeper inside. The Earth probably grew from the accumulation of these melted asteroids.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/melted_asteroids.html)

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

lswinford
2005-Jun-15, 08:21 PM
Maybe clumps of grains, the 'star dust' of the interstellar medium, maybe melted in the early fires of the sun--sort of setting too close to the stove? Maybe the 'jets' from the early sun were also belching out these blobs that cooled to their current form?

On the other hand, if the earth was an accretion of asteroids, and the asteroids were part of the original cloud our sun fired from, then perhaps some of these asteroids were remnants of exploded stars elsewhere? So, some asteroids, therefore, might be very much older than our solar system. (Which would make their name, aster-oids, ironicly appropriate, wouldn't it?)

StarLab
2005-Jun-16, 12:01 AM
The Earth probably grew from the accumulation of these melted asteroids. I&#39;m having a hard time believing that. :ph34r: :blink: :o <_< :rolleyes: :unsure: :huh: :wacko:

GOURDHEAD
2005-Jun-16, 03:21 AM
I didn&#39;t notice any convincing presentation of data or analysis.

jdwilt
2005-Jun-16, 05:48 AM
:lol: I have no trouble knowing how he earth was created. As a creationist I find it so humorus on how many thousands of theory&#39;s you non believers come up with. Ever thought of how it all started? I have one word for you "Origin" no matter how far you go, all the way to the atomic level, something had to start it, and you cannot get something from nothing and that is a scientific fact. Keep coming up with all these theory&#39;s and sooner or later it will dawn on you the obvious answer when you try to figure out how some gas or whatever you think started it came from. You people act like things just appeared from nothing. What you believe is way more far fetched than what non believers think of creation.

antoniseb
2005-Jun-16, 01:47 PM
Originally posted by jdwilt@Jun 16 2005, 05:48 AM
You people act like things just appeared from nothing.
Hi jdwilt, welcome to the UT forum,

We have some rules designed to prevent arguments and flame wars, and one of them includes posting political or religious content. I appreciate that you took the effort in this post to go up to the line, and not really cross it, though I&#39;d have to say some of the tone sounded like you were trying to pick a fight.

Please join the discussions, but be aware that the moderators will delete posts from either side that go too far.

aeolus
2005-Jun-16, 01:53 PM
That&#39;s alot of melted asteroids, considering the mantle makes up 50% of the volume of the Earth, and 68% of the mass...

Guest
2005-Jun-16, 06:20 PM
Although many tiny grains melted in the early solar system, a lot of the melting of larger objects is imaginary.

Analyses have revealed that isotopes of molybdenum (Mo) made by different types of nuclear reactions in stars never completely mixed - even in huge iron meteorites, bigger than most buildings.

Those results were first reported in the 1991 PhD dissertation of Qi-Lu at the University of Tokyo. They were later confirmed by analyses at Harvard.

Massive pieces of Fe-Ni that fall from the sky today have retained excesses (+) and deficiencies (-) of the Mo isotopes made by the r-, p-, and s-processes of nucleosynthesis in different stellar regions.

The imagined melting and geochemical differentiation of elements to form iron meteorites never occurred.

With kind regards,

Oliver (traveling)
http://www.umr.edu/~om

antoniseb
2005-Jun-16, 07:18 PM
Originally posted by Guest@Jun 16 2005, 06:20 PM
The imagined melting and geochemical differentiation of elements to form iron meteorites never occurred.
This study seemed to be talking about stony asteroids not metallic ones.

Guest
2005-Jun-16, 09:49 PM
Originally posted by antoniseb@Jun 16 2005, 07:18 PM
This study seemed to be talking about stony asteroids not metallic ones.
Hi, Anton.

Certainly the asteroid surfaces would be "stony", but the popular tale of geochemical differentiation has denser material like iron sinking downward.

According to the story, ". . . some asteroids experienced large-scale melting, with the formation of deep magma oceans. Such melted asteroids would have become layered with lighter rock forming near the surface, while denser rocks were deeper in the interior."

My comment simply points out that iron meteorites did come from such geochemically differentiated material.

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om

suitti
2005-Jun-17, 05:10 PM
It&#39;s hard to be sure, but this is likely the same research as reported
here (http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2005-06/ci-eme061505.php).

This article talks about neodymium isotope ratios. By actutally saying
what they are talking about, i had much less of a &#39;WTF?&#39; reaction.