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Stuart
2002-Nov-27, 02:16 PM
I've heard through the grapevine that the ISS may be abandoned, both on financial grounds and because intense vibration running through the station structure makes many of the planned uses difficult or impossible. is there any truth to these rumors? (I'm defense community, not space so anything I hear about the space program gets distorted)

ToSeek
2002-Nov-27, 02:54 PM
First I've heard. If there were any truth to the rumor, I'd expect either NasaWatch (http://www.nasawatch.com) or Bob Park (http://www.aps.org/WN/) (who really has it in for the ISS) to have mentioned it.

_________________
"... to strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield." - Tennyson, Ulysses

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: ToSeek on 2002-11-27 09:55 ]</font>

AJ
2002-Nov-27, 05:28 PM
I just read an article about it here
http://www.msnbc.com/news/840268.asp?0dm=C11MT

If the evacuation really happens no matter who's fault it is NASA will get covered in a lot of mud.

-AJ

heliopause
2002-Nov-27, 06:26 PM
Abandon ship! Spend the money on something worthwhile!

RafaelAustin
2002-Nov-27, 07:31 PM
Fear not fellow astronaut wannabees! The ISS is on schedule to complete it's upgrade through Shuttle flight 10A in Feb. 2004 to install U.S. Node 2 and complete the solar array. It leaves as questionable about 20 missions scheduled from April 2004 to January 2008. (http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/shuttle/future/index.html)

This is borrowed from a post I made on another BB 11-14-2002:

Looks like NASA has figured a way out of their budget problems and will finish the ISS and extend the Shuttle program with the assist of a new Space Plane. President Bush has signed off on this.

CNN article: (http://www.cnn.com/2002/TECH/space/11/14/space.plane.ap/)


The budget amendment calls for spending:

• $1.6 billion to upgrade and improve the four-vehicle space shuttle fleet so it could operate until about 2012. The plan leaves open an option of extending shuttle usage into the 2020s.

• $15.2 billion over the next decade or so to add a fifth shuttle flight to the annual schedule. The shuttle has been limited by budget constraints to four flights a year and nearly all have been dedicated to assembly of the space station. The added flight could be used to accelerate station assembly or to perform other missions that are not now possible.

• $6.6 billion through 2006 to finish the basic assembly of the space station. This includes completion and installation by February 19, 2004, of Node 2, a U.S.-made cornerstone component to which European and Japanese components will be attached. "Node 2 completion is a big deal for us," said O'Keefe.

• $1.8 billion to support biological and physical research aboard the space station.

• $2.4 billion to research and develop technologies needed to build a new space system to replace the shuttle. This money would continue a long-range effort to develop a reusable craft that could frequently fly into orbit with less preparation and effort than is required for the space shuttle. O'Keefe would not estimate the final cost of such a craft, but a chart released by the agency suggested it would first fly in 2015.

• $2.4 billion to complete by 2004 the design of a new space plane that is intended specifically to ferry people in and out of space. O'Keefe said the design is still uncertain, but it would be a reusable spacecraft launched by expendable rockets. It could carry as many as 10 people. The plan calls for the craft to start operations sometime between 2008 and 2010.

See also NASA's budget site. (http://www.nasa.gov/budget/budget2003_index.html)

Under Dog
2002-Dec-11, 03:13 AM
If nasa ever did that I would lose a lot of respect for them.

GrapesOfWrath
2002-Dec-11, 08:43 AM
Did you guys notice the APOD a couple days ago (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap021208.html)? Click on the image to get a nice blow up of the space station.

xriso
2002-Dec-11, 09:09 AM
Is that thing about the vibrations true?

selvaarchi
2015-Nov-02, 11:08 PM
This is the earliest thread I could find on the ISS. It is more about doom and how the vibration will mean abandoning it for good. Got news for you folks.:rimshot: ISS just celebrated 15 years from when the first crew to inhabit the research laboratory project arrived on November 2, 2000. Congratulations and happy 15th anniversary :clap:

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Space_station_marks_15_years_inhabited_by_astronau ts_999.html


The ISS was just a two-module unit when the first crew to inhabit the research laboratory project arrived on November 2, 2000.

They were American astronaut Bill Shepherd and Russian cosmonauts Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko.

Since then, a rotating cast of more than 220 of the world's elite astronauts have lived and worked at the ISS, which includes 16 participating nations and is led by the United States and Russia.

Modules were added over time and today the football-stadium-sized outfit represents about $100 billion dollars in investment and provides as much living space as a six-bedroom house.

Traveling at an altitude of about 250 miles (400 kilometers) and a speed of about 17,500 miles (28,000 kilometers) per hour, the space station circles the Earth once every 90 minutes.

Typically, six crew at a time eat, sleep and float around in the microgravity environment, working 35 hours per week on a host of science projects for a mission duration of about six months.

Brown Motie
2015-Nov-03, 04:22 AM
This is the earliest thread I could find on the ISS. It is more about doom and how the vibration will mean abandoning it for good. Got news for you folks.:rimshot: ISS just celebrated 15 years from when the first crew to inhabit the research laboratory project arrived on November 2, 2000. Congratulations and happy 15th anniversary :clap:

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Space_station_marks_15_years_inhabited_by_astronau ts_999.html

The ISS was just a two-module unit when the first crew to inhabit the research laboratory project arrived on November 2, 2000.

They were American astronaut Bill Shepherd and Russian cosmonauts Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko.

Since then, a rotating cast of more than 220 of the world's elite astronauts have lived and worked at the ISS, which includes 16 participating nations and is led by the United States and Russia.

Modules were added over time and today the football-stadium-sized outfit represents about $100 billion dollars in investment and provides as much living space as a six-bedroom house.

Traveling at an altitude of about 250 miles (400 kilometers) and a speed of about 17,500 miles (28,000 kilometers) per hour, the space station circles the Earth once every 90 minutes.

Typically, six crew at a time eat, sleep and float around in the microgravity environment, working 35 hours per week on a host of science projects for a mission duration of about six months.

Thank you, messenger from the future. We see now that our fears of ISS abandonment were unfounded.

Glom
2015-Nov-03, 11:11 PM
This thread dates back to Pre STS 107. A lot changed when that happened. It is some wonder ISS was able to grow to what it is.

banquo's_bumble_puppy
2015-Nov-03, 11:17 PM
The ISS is a marvel. I wonder if NASA can do a human mission to Mars and an ISS 2? I believe or have read that ISS is good 'til 2024; just about the time that things will start rolling for a Mars mission.

banquo's_bumble_puppy
2015-Nov-03, 11:19 PM
Well maybe 2024 is a little optimistic on the Mars front...alot optimistic.

selvaarchi
2015-Nov-14, 01:07 AM
Old age is showing. The ISS has a small problem with its power supply.

http://spaceflight101.com/space-station-suffers-partial-loss-of-power-mission-control-evaluates-recovery-options/


A switching box feeding power from one of the Station’s eight solar array wings tripped due to a short in the 1B power channel, leading to a loss of a number of systems on ISS. There is no immediate danger to the crew and systems are expected to be restored later on Friday by connecting them to another power channel. However, it will take Mission Control several days to diagnose the 1B issue, according to information passed to the six crew members on board the orbiting complex.

The trip in Direct Current Switching Unit 1B occurred around 18 UTC on Friday and knocked out one eighth of the Station’s total power, taking down one power channel. With one channel down, ISS still has seven good power supply channels which can carry all loads, permitting nominal operations to continue after loads have been re-balanced. A power management plan may be implemented to ensure margins for the individual channels are being protected, but all essential systems will receive continuous power.

selvaarchi
2015-Nov-17, 09:30 AM
ISS is back to normal. The affected power systems have since been switched to alternate channels.

Repairs to the affected area is another story. It will have to wait for parts to be delivered by a cargo early next year. It will then need at least one space walk to fix it.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Space_station_power_short_circuits_system_repairs_ needed_999.html


As SpaceFlight101 reported, most the systems that went down were redundant. No vital components completely lost power.

NASA told reporters that none of the astronauts are in danger and that the rest of power channels are functioning properly, but the damage may require spacewalk repairs. Astronauts must first wait for a new piece of electrical equipment to be delivered via a resupply rocket. A SpaceX rocket and cargo capsule will likely deliver the part early next year.

grapes
2015-Nov-17, 10:18 AM
This is the earliest thread I could find on the ISS.

Well, it was only a month after the (current) incarnation of the board. Wow, thirteen years

selvaarchi
2016-Jan-10, 03:00 AM
Canada is doing its bit to help the ISS prolong it's life. It is developing a new advanced space vision system (http://www.parabolicarc.com/2016/01/09/canadas-advanced-vision-system-inspect-space-station/#more-57214) to inspect the exterior of the station.

selvaarchi
2016-Jan-16, 04:23 AM
Talk about bad luck. Again when they are about to do a space walk, they detect water in one of the helmets.

http://m.space.com/31635-water-leak-astronaut-helmet-halts-spacewalk.html

For the second time in less than three years, a spacewalk outside of the International Space Station has been cut short because of a water leak in an astronaut's helmet.
A spacewalk involving NASA astronaut Tim Kopra and British colleague Tim Peake was called off about 2 hours early today (Jan. 15) when Kopra noticed some water inside his helmet.

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

publiusr
2016-Jan-16, 08:56 PM
First I've heard. If there were any truth to the rumor, I'd expect either NasaWatch (http://www.nasawatch.com) or Bob Park (http://www.aps.org/WN/) (who really has it in for the ISS) to have mentioned it.

_________________
"... to strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield." - Tennyson, Ulysses

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: ToSeek on 2002-11-27 09:55 ]</font>

With friends like those...

selvaarchi
2016-Jan-18, 03:19 PM
Now here is a pretty picture from the ISS. It is a flower and can be eaten.

http://www.tecake.com/scott-kelly-sends-image-first-ever-flower-grown-space/


US astronaut Scott Kelly aboard International Space Station (ISS) has tweeted the stunning pictures of the first flower grown in space. The first flower is an edible zinnia that is consumable and can be used in salads..

selvaarchi
2016-Jan-30, 06:39 AM
There might be an addition to the ISS. NanoRacks is proposing to build a large, half-cylinder-shaped airlock by the US private industry. This is good news indeed as with Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) that is more interest being shown by the private industry.

http://spaceksc.blogspot.my/2016/01/port-of-call.html


Eric Berger writes that “The $12 million-15 million airlock would also allow NASA to bring in costly large pumps and storage tanks for repairs rather than disposing of them.”

In January 2014, the Obama administration announced its intention to extend the ISS to 2024, four years beyond the existing agreement among the fifteen partner nations. As of this writing, all partners except the European Space Agency have agreed to the extension, and ESA is working through the formalities.

Extending the ISS to 2024 helped convince the NewSpace industry that there won't be a repeat of 2004, when the Bush administration announced its intention to end the station in Fiscal Year 2016 to fund what came to be known as Constellation. That administration chose to phase out university and commercial microgravity research in favor of research geared towards long-duration human spaceflight to the Moon and eventually to Mars. Principal investigators who were trying to raise money to fund ISS research felt betrayed by the NASA bureaucracy, and that distrust has lingered for years.

The multi-million dollar commitment by NanoRacks to add a new portal signals that the private sector now feels confident ISS will remain available for at least another ten years, if not longer.

selvaarchi
2016-Feb-06, 10:45 AM
The Russians will be getting upgraded spacesuits for their spacewalks from the ISS on 2016 :clap:

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Russia_to_Deliver_Three_Advanced_Spacesuits_to_ISS _in_2016_999.html


Three new advanced Russian Orlan-MKS spacesuits will be delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) by the end of 2016, the head of the Russian segment of the ISS said on Wednesday.

selvaarchi
2016-Mar-02, 10:00 AM
Astronauts Kelly and Kornienko land after "Year in Space" mission aboard ISS

http://www.spacepolicyonline.com/news/kelly-kornienko-land-after-year-in-space-mission-aboard-iss


NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko returned to Earth tonight (March 1) aboard the Soyuz TMA-18M spacecraft after 340 days in space. NASA bills the mission as a "Year in Space" even though it is not quite a year. It sets a record for the longest continuous duration in space for an American astronaut.

Joining Kelly and Kornienko on the ride home was cosmonaut Sergei Volkov, who arrived on the International Space Station in September.

The trio landed on the steppes of Kazahstan at 11:26 pm ET (10:26 am March 2 local time at the landing site). Kelly will soon board an airplane to fly back to Houston,TX. NASA TV is scheduled to cover his landing there at about 11:45 pm ET tomorrow (March 2) where he will be met by Second Lady of the United States Dr. Jill Biden, Science Adviser to the President John Holdren, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, and his brother, former astronaut Mark Kelly.

The Kelly brothers are identical twins and have been participating in a Twins Study throughout the mission to help scientists investigate the effects of long duration spaceflight mission on the human body in preparation for longer trips to destinations like Mars.

Although this is the longest continuous duration in space for an American, four Russian cosmonauts have spent 365 days or more in space. The record for total consecutive days in space is held by cosmonaut Valeri Polyakov who spent 438 days aboard the Mir space station in 1994-1995. Sergei Avdeyev spent 380 days on Mir in 1998-1999. Vladimir Titov and Musa Manarov spent 365 days together on Mir in 1987-1988. In all cases, other crews came and went during those missions.

selvaarchi
2016-Mar-18, 09:19 AM
If there is any truth in this article (http://asia.nikkei.com/magazine/20160211-China-Outbound/Tech-Science/Eyeing-China-US-and-Japan-aim-to-keep-the-space-station-aloft) then we have to thank China for the extension to 2024 and maybe longer.:evil:

selvaarchi
2016-Mar-19, 03:58 AM
The next crew to the ISS successfully launched (http://www.spacepolicyonline.com/news/russia-launches-latest-iss-crew-while-downscaling-its-long-term-plan) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome aboard Russia's Soyuz TMA-20M spacecraft at 5:26:38 pm Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) 18/3/2016. The article also contains a history of Russian space stations and a bit of their current financial problems.

selvaarchi
2016-Mar-29, 02:40 PM
Next flight of SpaceX to the ISS (http://www.popsci.com/6-exciting-and-tasty-experiments-that-may-help-us-get-to-mars-0) will have some experiments that will help with the journey to Mars. It of course includes BEAM but also a few other interesting experiments.

selvaarchi
2016-Apr-06, 03:12 PM
A short video on BEAM can be seen here (http://www.space.com/32480-beam-inflatable-module-private-moon-bases.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+spaceheadlines+%28SPACE.com+H eadline+Feed%29). It will show it being extracted from storage, then attached to the ISS and expended.

selvaarchi
2016-Apr-09, 11:11 AM
Everything you wanted to know about BEAM (https://astrowright.wordpress.com/2016/04/08/everything-you-wanted-to-know-about-beam-but-were-afraid-to-ask/) but were afraid to ask

publiusr
2016-Apr-09, 06:58 PM
More expandable than inflatable.

How do you ground all inflatable space stations. As modules on ISS that's fine--but you abandon metal at your own risk.

Noclevername
2016-Apr-10, 08:26 AM
How do you ground all inflatable space stations. As modules on ISS that's fine--but you abandon metal at your own risk.

If the article selvaarchi linked is accurate, the outer layers might serve the same purpose.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_fibers#Composite_materials


Reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) consists of carbon fiber-reinforced graphite, and is used structurally in high-temperature applications. The fiber also finds use in filtration of high-temperature gases, as an electrode with high surface area and impeccable corrosion resistance, and as an anti-static component.

bold mine

selvaarchi
2016-Apr-11, 09:21 PM
Interesting article in "NewSpace India" where it tries to look at the financial cost to India (http://www.newspaceindia.com/will-isro-participate-in-the-international-space-station/) of joining the ISS and concludes it is not cost justified.

I agree with the present budget ISRO has, it will just not be doable. The present priority for ISRO should be to get GSLV MKIII tested and operational. It will take another 3 to 4 years to do that. By that time the ISS will be on its last legs and it will just be too late to justify India joining as a full member of that mission. Better to spend what spare $$$ in building their next rocket (ULV) as well as their own manned capsule.

selvaarchi
2016-May-15, 09:25 PM
We have heard from time to time, how Russia plans to use part of its current modules of the ISS for its future space station. Intresting to note int the current discussion with NASA on how to, "refine procedures relating to the disposal of the Station at the end of its service life, or in the event of an emergency", there is no talk about separating the modules first.

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2016/05/nasa-roscosmos-discuss-iss-suicide-requirements/


While the hardware-limiting factor requires no immediate demand for a deorbit plan, an emergency scenario – where the Station becomes crippled and has to be evacuated – would potentially call for its disposal within a relatively short timescale.

NASA’s Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) members have taken a keen interest in the safe disposal of the Station, known as the EOL (End Of Life) game plan.

Back in 2013, the ASAP heard from (former) ISS Program manager Mike Suffredini, who described the evaluations on what would be an EOL scenario for the Station.

“NASA now has a plan so that in the event the Station must be evacuated, there will be a 14-day period in which to make a decision on whether or not to bring the ISS down,” noted Mr. Suffredini at the time. “The Program is setting the contingency plan in place, although there is still a lot of work to be done.”

That initial plan called for a period of 180 days to allow the Station to decay its path towards the deorbit altitude.

During this period, Russia would launch two Russian Progress vehicles to autonomously transfer propellant to the Service Module thrusters and to prepare themselves to provide additional deorbit propulsion.

However, further evaluations noted this was a simplified emergency plan and further considerations had to be made to ensure the huge structure would be destroyed over a safe area of ocean.

Almost three years later, the ASAP heard of a new TIM-level meeting between NASA and Roscosmos, held at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) at the end of April.

selvaarchi
2016-May-17, 02:22 PM
Congratulations ISS :clap: :rimshot:International Space Station completes 100,000th orbit

http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/missions/iss/international-space-station-completes-100000th-orbit/


The International Space Station (ISS) has completed its 100,000th orbit around Earth. For the past 17 years, the outpost has been a hub of scientific advancement, international cooperation, and fantastic views of our home world.

At 12:10 a.m. EDT (06:10 GMT) on Monday, May 16, 2016, the ISS began its 100,000th orbit since the launch of the first element—the Zarya Functional Cargo Block—which took place on Nov. 20, 1998 atop a Russian Proton-K rocket.

“It’s a tribute to the teams that designed [ISS], that put it together, the programs that keep us flying safe, the people that work 24/7 365 days a year to keep us effectively executing the mission and executing it safely,” said Expedition 47 Flight Engineer and NASA astronaut, Jeff Williams.

The ISS is a partnership between five major space agencies: NASA, Roscosmos, the European Space Agency (ESA), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). All total, some 16 different nations are involved with the project.

Flying more than 2.6 billion miles, the outpost has seen visitors and crews from 18 different countries. Over 220 individual astronauts and cosmonauts have floated through the station’s modules, including the current Expedition 47 crew: NASA astronauts Williams and Tim Kopra (the Expedition 47 Commander), ESA astronaut Tim Peake, and Russian cosmonauts Aleksy Ovchinin, Oleg Skripochka, and Yuri Malenchenko.

Swift
2016-May-18, 08:31 PM
Does that mean it is no longer under warranty? :D

Noclevername
2016-May-18, 08:41 PM
Does that mean it is no longer under warranty? :D

It's due to have its oil changed.

spjung
2016-May-18, 10:08 PM
It's due to have its oil changed.
They have to rotate the solar panels as well.

publiusr
2016-May-20, 08:56 PM
Does that mean it is no longer under warranty? :D

Dinged already! https://twitter.com/astro_timpeake/status/730746160944717825

The culprit being a paint fleck from a Wal-Mart shopping cart no doubt.

Glom
2016-May-23, 08:36 AM
Dinged already! https://twitter.com/astro_timpeake/status/730746160944717825

The culprit being a paint fleck from a Wal-Mart shopping cart no doubt.
Yikes. What do they intend to do about that?

Trebuchet
2016-May-24, 02:14 PM
Yikes. What do they intend to do about that?

Call the Glass Doctor, they'll fix your panes!

selvaarchi
2016-Jun-02, 11:11 AM
The next launches of Soyuz and Progress spacecraft to the International Space Station (ISS) are being delayed because of problems with the docking system.

http://www.spacepolicyonline.com/news/tass-russia-delays-next-soyuz-progress-launches


Both spacecraft have recently been upgraded to "MS" versions. The upcoming Soyuz launch is the first of the MS variant (MS-01), while the first Progress MS was launched in December 2015.

The Soyuz spacecraft has been upgraded several times since it was first launched in 1967. Soyuz MS replaces the Soyuz TMA-M series. The MS version has improved solar arrays, a new digital computer, and a new docking system.

TASS reported today that the launch of Soyuz MS-01 has been delayed from June 24 to July 7 "due to control system flaws that may disrupt the ship's docking with the ISS." July 7 was the date of the next Progress MS launch, which is now rescheduled for July 17.

Cougar
2016-Jun-02, 01:31 PM
It's due to have its oil changed.

They'll probably take the opportunity to tell you it needs a lot of other stuff done, too. Don't fall for it!

selvaarchi
2016-Jun-13, 02:54 PM
It is still many years away but do you know where the International Space Station will go to die? :confused:

http://www.popsci.com/this-is-where-international-space-station-will-go-to-die


The cold void of the ocean floor is the closest thing Earthlings can come to the conditions of space. Nothing really lives there, and nothing ever visits. It’s freezing, dark and empty. However, off the coast of New Zealand, the Pacific Ocean is home to what may be the most exclusive scientific burial ground in the world: the so-called Spacecraft Cemetery has become the final resting place for hundreds of manmade space objects.

selvaarchi
2016-Jun-15, 10:39 AM
ISS is being upgraded with the addition of the multipurpose Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/NASAs_NICER_Mission_Arrives_at_Kennedy_Space_Cente r_999.html


NICER is an Astrophysics Mission of Opportunity within NASA's Explorer program, which provides frequent flight opportunities for world-class scientific investigations from space utilizing innovative, streamlined and efficient management approaches within the heliophysics and astrophysics science areas. NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate supports the SEXTANT component of the mission, demonstrating pulsar-based spacecraft navigation.

Neutron stars, which squeeze up to twice the sun's mass into a city-size volume, are powerfully bound by gravity that is exceeded only around black holes. Theory has advanced a host of models to describe the physics of neutron star interiors, including the very nature of high-density matter that cannot be produced in any laboratory on Earth. NICER's astrophysical observations will test these models.

Some rapidly rotating neutron stars, called pulsars, are cosmic lighthouses that sweep narrow beams of radiation through space as they spin. Pulsars can spin up to hundreds of times every second, producing flashes of light from radio through gamma rays detected at Earth with clock-like regularity.

NICER will exploit these pulsations to perform cutting-edge astrophysics investigations while another aspect of the mission - the Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT) project - demonstrates a technological first: real-time, autonomous spacecraft navigation using pulsars as beacons, ultimately furthering deep space exploration into the solar system and beyond.

NICER's X-ray Timing Instrument (XTI) offers an unprecedented combination of capabilities to view the emissions of neutron stars in "soft" X-ray light (less energetic than the X-rays typically used for medical imaging). A bundle of 56 co-aligned optics and X-ray sensors, the instrument represents an innovative configuration of flight-proven components, minimizing risk and meeting the science investigation's demands of fast timing and the ability to measure the energies of detected X-ray photons.

selvaarchi
2016-Jun-23, 07:21 PM
Bigelow has indicated they were interested in attaching their B330 expandable modules on the ISS as a precursor to its planned commercial space stations. Now they might have competition as another has also indicated they too might want to do the same. NASA will have to decide of one or two extra modules can attach to the ISS and if only one, which one.

http://spacenews.com/former-nasa-iss-manger-planning-commercial-space-station-venture/


Once the ISS reaches the end of its life, currently planned for no earlier than 2024, Axiom Space would remove the module from the station. It would then become the core of a new commercial space station with the addition of various modules and hardware, including an airlock, docking node, and power and propulsion equipment.

Suffredini believes that there is a robust market for a commercial space station. A study commissioned by Axiom Space concluded the addressable market for such a station could be as large as $37 billion between 2020 and 2030, combining various commercial and government uses.

Axiom Space’s plans, though, could put it into conflict with Bigelow Aerospace. In April, Bigelow announced it had started discussions with NASA about installing one of its B330 expandable modules on the ISS as a precursor to its planned commercial space stations.

Bigelow already has a presence on the ISS with its Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM), a demonstration of expandable module technology developed under a NASA contract. BEAM arrived at the station on a commercial cargo flight in April and expanded to its full size in May, and will remain there for up to two years.

Suffredini noted that neither his company nor Bigelow have any deals yet with NASA to install modules. It’s also unclear if the station could accommodate both companies’ modules. “Ports are a precious resource,” he said, referring to docking ports on the ISS. “NASA has to figure out how to deal with that.”

publiusr
2016-Jun-24, 10:45 PM
It is still many years away but do you know where the International Space Station will go to die? :confused:

http://www.popsci.com/this-is-where-international-space-station-will-go-to-die

Some ISS links for you
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=40582.0

Your answer
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/A_Burial_Plot_for_the_International_Space_Station_ 999.html

ISS tour http://www.space.com/33164-virtual-tour-of-space-station.html
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=40499.0 ROSA
http://www.nasa.gov/feature/roll-out-solar-array-technology-benefits-for-nasa-commercial-sector

selvaarchi
2016-Jun-30, 12:55 PM
We have heard from time to time, how Russia plans to use part of its current modules of the ISS for its future space station. Intresting to note int the current discussion with NASA on how to, "refine procedures relating to the disposal of the Station at the end of its service life, or in the event of an emergency", there is no talk about separating the modules first.

Looks like I was wrong on this one and the Russians are planing to use part of the current modules!!!

http://www.popularmechanics.com/space/a21543/russian-plan-new-space-station-iss/


Russia's main contractor in human space flight just detailed its plans to separate the newest modules from the International Space Station (ISS) once the long-lived project comes to an end in the 2020s. It plans to build a new habitable base in Earth orbit called the Russian Orbital Station, or ROS. The outpost will include three modules initially, possibly joined by two more in the future.

Russian plans to split the ISS have been circulating for years. Now, for a host of political, financial, and technical reasons, this isn't just a wild idea on paper anymore.

selvaarchi
2016-Jul-12, 06:53 AM
Wow I did not know that. We have been doing research for 10 years on plant biology using the ISS.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/A_decade_of_plant_biology_in_space_999.html


On this day 10 years ago, Space Shuttle Discovery was launched to the International Space Station carrying ESA's European Modular Cultivation System - a miniature greenhouse to probe how plants grow in weightlessness. From looking at how plants know where to grow roots to how light can influence growth, and how the tips of plant roots bend as they grow, it is a flagship research facility on the orbiting complex.

Installed by ESA astronaut Thomas Reiter in 2006, it nurtures plants from seedlings to maturity, and allows both astronauts and research teams on the ground to intervene and change the conditions. Every aspect of the growing environment can be regulated - temperature, atmosphere, water and light - and two centrifuges simulate gravity up to twice Earth's level to compare how plants respond to different degrees of gravity.

selvaarchi
2016-Jul-14, 01:56 PM
The ISS to be upgraded with two new docking ports that Boeing Starliner and SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft will use when they start docking with ISS. Because the adapter is designed to an international standard, future spacecraft will be able to dock there, too.

The 1st of the new docking ports will be carried to the ISS by the SpaceX CRS-9 mission.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2016/07/14/spacex-crs9-carrying-crucial-port-station/


A metallic ring big enough for astronauts and cargo to fit through is scheduled to fly to the International Space Station in July as part of the cargo aboard a SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft loaded with materials for the orbiting laboratory and its crew. The ring is known as an International Docking Adapter, or IDA, and its main purpose is to provide a port for spacecraft bringing astronauts to the station in the future.
The Dragon and its cargo will fly into orbit aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket that will take about 10 minutes to lift the spacecraft from its launch pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida to an orbit to catch up with the station. It will take about two days for the Dragon to reach the station. Once within reach of the station’s robotic arm, the Dragon will be berthed to the orbital complex by the astronauts already on the station.

Outfitted with a host of sensors and systems, the adapter is built so spacecraft systems can automatically perform all the steps of rendezvous and dock with the station without input from the astronauts. Manual backup systems will be in place on the spacecraft to allow the crew to take over steering duties, if needed.

“It’s a passive system which means it doesn’t take any action by the crew to allow docking to happen and I think that’s really the key,” said David Clemen Boeing’s director of Development/Modifications for the space station.

selvaarchi
2016-Aug-21, 10:59 AM
Russia considering cutting its crew size for the ISS from 3 to 2 as a cost cutting measure.

http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/missions/iss/russia-mulls-reducing-iss-crew/


Russia is considering reducing its International Space Station (ISS) crew from three to two, a Roscosmos official said last week. The proposal is seen by the agency as a way to increase efficiency and reduce costs of the country’s space program.

On Thursday, Aug. 11, Russian newspaper Izvestia reported that Sergei Krikalev, director of manned programs at Roscosmos, has announced potential plans to reduce the number of cosmonauts and started soliciting this idea among the ISS international partners.

“We have sent letters to the ISS program participants, we want to hear their opinion on how we should reduce the crew and when, there are nuances here,” Krikalev told Izvestia. “We are interested in the opinion of Mission Control, the Institute of Medical and Biological Problems, our partners in the ISS.”

selvaarchi
2016-Aug-21, 11:06 AM
New port installed on the ISS.

http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/missions/iss/new-front-porch-added-international-space-station/


Two members of the International Space Station’s Expedition 48 crew stepped outside the orbital complex to install a new “front porch”. The nearly six-hour long spacewalk started at 7:04 a.m. CDT (12:04 GMT) Aug. 19 with a goal to install International Docking Adapter-2 (IDA-2) to the forward end of the station.

NASA astronauts Jeff Williams and Kate Williams, commander and flight engineer, respectively, each tag-teamed to install IDA-2 as the primary task of the mission. The adapter was brought to the space station by way of SpaceX‘s CRS-9 Dragon. It has remained inside the trunk since arriving at the outpost one month ago.

selvaarchi
2016-Sep-19, 04:13 PM
The next manned flight to the ISS is delayed due to a short circuit.

http://www.russianspaceweb.com/2016.html#ms02


On September 17, Roskosmos announced that after final tests of the spacecraft, its launch had to be postponed from September 23. The new launch date has not been announced. According to industry sources, the delay was caused by a short circuit, which took place during roll-on of the payload fairing, which protects the spacecraft during its ascent through the atmosphere. The problem was not detected until the vehicle had been rotated back to a vertical position and was being prepared for the second fit check at Site 254 in Baikonur. The situation was complicated by the fact that engineers could not immediately identify the location of the short circuit in the fully assembled spacecraft. Preliminary estimates indicated that such an issue inside the descent module, SA, could require several weeks to fix, however if the problem was in the instrument module, PAO, it could take several months to resolve.

In worst case scenario, mission officials might decide to replace the Soyuz vehicle No. 732, which was affected by the problem, with Vehicle No. 733 originally intended for the Soyuz MS-03 mission. According to the official Russian media, the launch of the Soyuz MS-02 might be postponed until at least the beginning of October.

selvaarchi
2016-Sep-20, 11:55 AM
It is now official. The Russians will reduce their astronauts on the ISS from 3 to 2. They have also set a new launch date for the manned mission to the ISS to 1st of November.

http://www.spacepolicyonline.com/news/russia-sets-new-launch-date-for-soyuz-ms-02-will-reduce-russian-crews-to-two


Russia's TASS news service reports today that the new launch date for Soyuz MS-02 is November 1. The launch had been scheduled for this Friday, September 23, but was postponed for technical reasons. Separately, Russia has decided to reduce the number of cosmonauts it has aboard the International Space Station (ISS) from three to two in order to reduce resupply requirements.

selvaarchi
2016-Sep-23, 03:35 AM
Soyuz MS-02 team faces dangerous repairs (http://www.russianspaceweb.com/soyuz-ms-02.html)

Originally scheduled for launch tomorrow, Sept. 23, 2016, the Soyuz MS-02 spacecraft was hit with a mysterious short circuit last week, which required postponing the mission indefinitely. After pinpointing the problem to an improperly bent cable located behind cosmonauts seats in the descent module, Russian engineers now have to repair the vehicle loaded with toxic propellants and pressurized gases despite existing safety rules prohibiting such operations, RussianSpaceWeb.com learned. Details below.

selvaarchi
2016-Sep-27, 11:16 AM
Work on the MLM module which is supposed to attach to the ISS has stalled again.

http://www.russianspaceweb.com/iss_fgb2.html#2016_politics


In the course of 2016, the launch of the MLM module slipped again to December 2017, or around six months behind the previously quoted launch date. According to a press-release issued by RKK Energia on June 20, the company completed the manufacturing and testing of unidentified equipment for the interior of the module.

At the same time, the head of RKK Energia was quoted as saying that the development of documentation and the installation of large pieces of hardware on the exterior of the spacecraft had entered the final stage.

However, as of middle of September, all the work on the assembly of the MLM module had stalled again. According to industry sources, most of replacement components for the MLM's faulty propulsion system had already been manufactured, except for the pipelines, which would have to be bent based on their particular situation on the module. Still, military quality control officers, who now certify all space industry manufacturing operations, refused to give the green light for the final assembly of the propulsion system for the MLM.

selvaarchi
2016-Sep-29, 12:08 PM
New date for the launch of the Soyuz MS-02 mission.

http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/missions/iss/soyuz-ms-02-launch-now-targeted-october-19/


Russia has re-scheduled the launch of the Soyuz MS-02 mission to the International Space Station (ISS), setting Oct. 19 as the new launch date. The spacecraft assigned to transport the three Expedition 49 crew members to the orbiting lab are scheduled to lift off atop a Soyuz-FG launcher, at 4:03 a.m. EDT (8:03 GMT), from Site 1/5 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

“It is planned that the primary and backup crews depart for the launch site on October 7. The launch is scheduled for October 19, 11:03 Moscow time (08:03 GMT),” a source in the Russian rocket and space industry told TASS.

The start of the Soyuz MS-02 mission was initially targeted for Sept. 23 but was delayed due to a technical malfunction – a burned cable inside the spacecraft. Last week, the Roscosmos State Corporation announced that the launch would be rescheduled for Nov. 1. It was decided to send the crew back to the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center near Moscow to continue training until the new launch date gets closer.

Soyuz MS-02 will be the second mission of the upgraded Soyuz-MS spacecraft. The crew for this mission consists of NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough and Russian cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Andrei Borisenko.

selvaarchi
2016-Oct-01, 06:28 AM
Work on the MLM module which is supposed to attach to the ISS has stalled again.

The problem with the MLM module is more political in nature rather than technical.

http://www.russianspaceweb.com/iss_fgb2.html#2016_politics


The stumbling block holding the assembly of the MLM has apparently a political nature rather than any real engineering justification. According to industry sources, the management at the military certification authority apparently ran into worsening relations with the leadership of the space industry. Ironically, it was a severe oversight on the part of the military certification officials that previously cleared the module for launch with a damaged propulsion system, industry sources charged. This time, political pressure from the top would probably be needed to move things forward, sources told RussianSpaceWeb.com.

selvaarchi
2016-Oct-02, 04:01 PM
Russia is planing to upgrade their cargo ship, Progress, to carry an extra ton of cargo. This will enable them to cut the number of cargo trips from 4 to 3 a year.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/space/a22477/russia-new-cargo-space-ship/


Russian engineers are finishing the design of a brand new space freighter that would replace the veteran Progress cargo ships supplying the International Space Station (ISS) with propellant, food, water and other goods, industry sources tell Popular Mechanics.

The new vehicle will be about a ton heavier than its predecessor and will feature a radical new design. If it's actually built, the next-generation cargo ship will allow Russia to reduce the number of annual cargo shipments to the ISS from four to three while still delivering all necessary provisions for three people to live more or less permanently aboard the ISS.

selvaarchi
2016-Oct-03, 12:24 PM
Another new facility to be introduced to the ISS.

http://spacenews.com/airbus-signs-up-first-customer-for-external-space-station-platform/


An Australian company that is developing an electric thruster is the first customer for an external research platform Airbus Defence and Space plans to install on the International Space Station by the end of 2018.

At a ceremony at the International Astronautical Congress here Sept. 28, Airbus signed an agreement with Neumann Space to host a payload on Airbus’ Bartolomeo platform. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Neumann Space is an Australian company developing a solar-electric thruster that uses metallic fuels rather than a gas like xenon. The company believes that the thruster will have a higher performance versus conventional electric thrusters and be able to use a wide range of metals as fuels.

The company will install an experimental payload on Bartolomeo, a platform that Airbus plans to mount on the exterior of the Columbus module for experiments that require access to the space environment.

selvaarchi
2016-Oct-05, 07:29 AM
The launch date MLM module for the ISS has slipped to March 2018.:(

http://www.russianspaceweb.com/iss_fgb2.html#2016_politics


The flight version of the spacecraft currently remains at Khrunichev factory in the District of Fili in Moscow with only a partially assembled propulsion system. The official schedule still calls for the launch of the spacecraft at the end of 2017, however, in order to meet this deadline, all key systems have to be assembled and the module needs to leave Fili for Baikonur Cosmodrome in April 2017. A processing team in Baikonur will need next eight months to test and fuel the 19-ton spacecraft and prepare it for integration with its Proton rocket. According to officials close to the project, the December 2017 launch deadline could still be met, however, more likely, the MLM mission will have to be postponed for a few months into the beginning of 2018.

When discussing with European space officials the launch of the European Robotic Arm, ERA, on the MLM module, their Russian colleagues indicated that the mission had been tentatively planned for March 2018.

selvaarchi
2016-Oct-06, 09:57 PM
Next launch of the crew to the ISS is now been confirmed. It is October 19, 11:05 Moscow Time:clap:

http://www.russianspaceweb.com/soyuz-ms-02.html#program


On October 6, 2016, the State Commission overseeing the launch certified the results of the spacecraft repairs and approved the new launch manifest for the Russian missions to the ISS:

October 19, 11:05 Moscow Time: Soyuz MS-02 launch;

October 30: Landing of the Soyuz MS-01 spacecraft;

November 16: Soyuz MS-03 launch;

December 1: Progress MS-04 launch.

selvaarchi
2016-Oct-09, 05:27 AM
Russia will be using a longer route to the ISS so as to check out the new Soyuz MS-02 systems. The article then goes on and explains the reason for the delay and also Russian experience with space stations having built six successful Salyut space stations between 1971 and 1982 and the multi-modular Mir space station that operated from 1986-2001.

It is the last part of the article that caught my eye as they compare that with what is China puny space station. Even their eventually space station at 60 MT will be smaller than the 1st US space station Skylab which comes in at 77 MT. But is weight the only criteria to use as comparison!

Instrumentation and support systems today will weigh a lot less than 40 years ago. Even comparing Tiangong-1 and Tiangong-2 although physically the same size has differences. Tiangong-2 has more space to increase the comfort level for their astronauts.

Can the experts do a comparison between the various space stations please. That is beyond me abilities :(

http://www.spacepolicyonline.com/news/russia-china-ready-to-launch-new-space-station-crews


Russia has scheduled the Soyuz MS-02 launch for October 19. Delayed from September 23 for technical reasons, it will take one American and two Russians to the International Space Station (ISS). Meanwhile, China is getting ready to launch a two-man crew to its new Tiangong-2 space station sometime this month.

Soyuz MS-02 is the second flight of a new version of the Soyuz spacecraft, which made its first flight in 1967. The spacecraft has been upgraded several times over the decades. The MS version replaces TMA-M and has improved solar arrays, a new digital computer, and a new docking system, among other upgrades. The first spacecraft, Soyuz MS-01, was launched in July and is currently docked to the ISS. That launch also was delayed -- from June 24 to July 7 -- for technical reasons reportedly related to the new docking system.

Russia's official news agency TASS announced the new Soyuz MS-02 launch date today adding that the delay was due to a "squeezed cable" in the spacecraft.

It will take NASA's Shane Kimbrough and Roscosmos's Andrey Borisenko and Sergey Ryzhilov to ISS. They will be welcomed by the three crew members currently aboard -- NASA's Kate Rubins, JAXA's Takuya Ohishi and Roscosmos's Anatoly Ivanishin -- when they arrive two days later. Russia is using the longer 2-day trajectory to get to ISS instead of the short 6-hour journey in order to check out the new spacecraft's systems.

publiusr
2016-Oct-09, 09:27 PM
I still put Skylab #1 for the fun factor. Very roomy large module. Wish it had been saved and made part of ISS--different pressure level though.

selvaarchi
2016-Oct-12, 08:47 PM
Now we get a glimmer of hope that there might be a post ISS from the commercial sector. NASA has agreed to attaching commercial modules to the ISS.:clap:

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2016/10/11/nasa-move-adding-private-module-capabilities-space-station/


NASA will move ahead with an initiative that will allow private companies to attach commercial modules and other technologies to the International Space Station, officials announced today.

In a post on the NASA and White House websites, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden and Presidential Science Advisor John Holdren said the private sector had responded strongly to a space agency request for information (RFI) issued earlier this year offering the station for a variety of commercial uses.

selvaarchi
2016-Oct-14, 04:17 PM
Axiom Space, Bigelow Outline Plans for ISS Commercial Module

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2016/10/14/ispcs-iss-module-discussions/


The NASA plan for a commercial module was discussed this week in three presentations at the International Symposium for Personal and Commercial Spaceflight in Las Cruces, NM.

NASA Associate Administrator Bill Gerstenmaier gave one presentation. Michael Baine of Axiom Space and Robert Bigelow of Bigelow Aerospace discussed the modules their companies will propose for the station.

NASA issued a request for information (RFI) earlier this year seeking ideas for the attachment of a commercial module to the International Space Station (ISS).

A berthing port will be available beginning in 2018 when Bigelow Aerospace’s experimental BEAM module is detached from the space station after a two-year test of inflatable technology in space.

Below are notes from the three sessions derived from Twitter posts.

selvaarchi
2016-Oct-21, 12:14 PM
Soyuz MS-02 spacecraft docks with Expedition 49/50 crew

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2016/10/soyuz-ms-02-expeditions-4950-launch/


After nearly a month long delay to fix a technical issue with the spacecraft, the Russian Federal Space Agency’s Soyuz MS-02 human-rated spacecraft launched three new crew members for Expedition 49/50 crews to the International Space Station on October 19, ahead of completing a two-day orbital rendezvous with the Station on Friday.

selvaarchi
2016-Oct-27, 10:41 AM
By coincidence both ISS and China Space Station (CSS) are planting lettuce (https://forum.cosmoquest.org/showthread.php?152373-China-Space-Station&p=2375315#post2375315).

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/New_lettuce_crop_begins_growing_aboard_ISS_999.htm l


Just as farmers on Earth are planting leafy greens for the fall growing season, astronauts aboard the International Space Station are planting their third on-orbit crop of red romaine lettuce.

Early this morning, NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough initiated the Veg-03 experiment, one of his first science assignments as a new crew member aboard the orbiting laboratory. As Kimbrough worked, members of the Veggie team watched from their consoles in the Experiment Monitoring Area located in Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

A live video downlink from the orbiting laboratory allowed the scientists to remotely watch Kimbrough's actions and ensure he did not encounter any challenges with the activity or hardware.

"Operations went great today! A little slower than expected, but all plant pillows were successfully primed for the first time in our Veg series," said Nicole Dufour, NASA's Veggie project manager. Plant pillows are small pouches already containing a growth medium, fertilizer and seeds; to start them growing, astronauts simply add a little water.

"We previously have had some hardware issues that prevented at least one pillow from each 'grow out' from being successfully primed, so we were very excited to achieve that milestone," she added.

Astronauts on future long-duration space missions will need to be able to grow their own food to supplement their diets. Using the Veggie plant growth facility aboard the station, Veg-03 builds on the successes of previous studies, including Veg-01, which resulted in the first-ever on-orbit harvest and sampling of fresh produce during the summer of 2015. Techniques learned from Veggie crops will sow benefits on Earth and help NASA prepare for the Journey to Mars.

The Veg-03 crop will be the Veggie team's first on-orbit attempt at a new, repetitive harvest technique termed 'Cut-and-Come-Again'.

selvaarchi
2016-Oct-27, 11:46 AM
NASA television to air the return of three ISS crew members on Saturday, Oct. 29, with coverage of activities beginning the day before on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-television-to-air-return-of-three-space-station-crew-members-0


Expedition 49 Commander Anatoly Ivanishin of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, and Flight Engineers Kate Rubins of NASA and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, will undock their Soyuz spacecraft from the space station at 8:37 p.m. EDT Saturday and land in Kazakhstan at 11:59 p.m. (9:59 a.m. Oct. 30, Kazakhstan time).

Their return will wrap up 115 days in space for the crew since their launch in July.

Together, the Expedition 49 crew members pursued hundreds of experiments in biology, biotechnology, physical science and Earth science aboard the orbiting laboratory.

selvaarchi
2016-Oct-28, 05:13 PM
The next launch of astronauts to the ISS has been postponed by 48 hours.

http://news.asiaone.com/news/science-and-tech/launch-three-astronauts-iss-postponed


The launch next month of a Soyuz spacecraft carrying three astronauts to the International Space Station has been postponed by 48 hours, Russia's space agency said Friday, reportedly to ensure better docking conditions.

The delay came after the previous manned launch to the ISS set for September was postponed for almost a month due to technical issues.

selvaarchi
2016-Oct-30, 12:54 PM
Three astronauts returned from the ISS today. That leaves 5 astronauts in space. 3 in the ISS and 2 in the CSS.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/US_Russian_Japanese_astronauts_return_from_ISS_999 .html


Three astronauts landed safely in Kazakhstan Sunday following a 115-day mission aboard the the International Space Station, including US astronaut Kate Rubins, the first person to sequence DNA in space.

Russian mission control confirmed the touchdown of NASA's Rubins, Roscosmos' Anatoly Ivanishin and Takuya Onishi of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency at 0358 GMT.

The trio landed southeast of the Kazakh steppe town of Zhezkazgan in frosty conditions after a flight from the orbital lab.

"Landing has taken place!" Russian mission control stated, with commentators on NASA TV noting that the Soyuz craft had landed in an upright position.

Swift
2016-Dec-01, 07:02 PM
Should I call this "a lack of progress"?

spaceflightnow.com (http://spaceflightnow.com/2016/12/01/progress-ms04-launch/)


Russian mission control said Thursday an unpiloted Progress space station supply ship carrying nearly 5,400 pounds of rocket fuel, food, water and a new spacesuit burned up in Earth’s atmosphere shortly after it blasted off from Kazakhstan, and evidence points to a problem with the third stage of the cargo carrier’s Soyuz booster.

The Russian space agency — Roscosmos — confirmed the demise of the Progress MS-04 cargo craft in a statement, saying the automated spaceship was lost as it flew nearly 120 miles (190 kilometers) over the Tuva Republic in Southern Russia.

selvaarchi
2016-Dec-03, 01:35 PM
ESA has endorsed the extension of the ISS to 2024.

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-administrator-statement-on-esa-s-commitment-to-space-station


The following is a statement from NASA Administrator Charles Bolden on ESA’s (European Space Agency’s) decision to continue its operations aboard the International Space Station:

"I'm excited all the International Space Station partners have now joined us in committing to operation of this invaluable resource through at least 2024.

"The European Space Agency contributions to station are essential, and we look forward to continuing to work with ESA, the Canadian Space Agency, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, and Roscosmos for extended operations, and to collaborating with other nations to push the boundaries of human exploration, and extend our reach farther into the solar system as part of the ongoing Journey to Mars."

selvaarchi
2016-Dec-20, 12:11 AM
Should I call this "a lack of progress"?

spaceflightnow.com (http://spaceflightnow.com/2016/12/01/progress-ms04-launch/)

Still no news on the cause of the failure. Some updated on the investigation.

http://www.russianspaceweb.com/progress-ms-04.html#1210


Ten days after the loss of the Progress MS-04 spacecraft, the root cause of the accident largely remained a mystery to the investigators, but a number of posts from industry sources on the online forum of the Novosti Kosmonavtiki magazine shed a great deal of light on the circumstances surrounding the unexplained launch failure.

Based on the telemetry leading to the accident, investigators established that the launch vehicle most likely had never received the so-called AVD command for the emergency engine cutoff, despite previous reports that such a command had been issued. Nevertheless, it became clear that the spacecraft and the third stage of the Soyuz-U launch vehicle had separated around 140 seconds prematurely during the powered ascent to orbit. The cause of the separation still remains a mystery, but engineers were apparently checking the hypothesis that the flight control system onboard the cargo ship could initiate the process. Under normal conditions, pyrotechnics cut links between the two vehicles on a command from the rocket after it has reached orbit. However, the spacecraft has its own backup process, which could perform the same operation. Observers were especially puzzled by the fact that the physical separation between the two vehicles was even possible at all, with the third stage still accelerating under the full thrust of its RD-0110 engine.

selvaarchi
2017-Jan-07, 09:50 AM
Two American astronauts did a space walk to replace the old batteries with new lithium-ion units.

http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/missions/iss/1st-battery-replacement-spacewalk-completed-at-iss/

"Two NASA astronauts on the first of two spacewalks outside the International Space Station (ISS) made swift work to help with the replacement of old batteries with new lithium-ion units. They even had enough time left over to perform several get-ahead tasks."

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

selvaarchi
2017-Jan-13, 04:53 AM
Still no news on the cause of the failure. Some updated on the investigation.

http://www.russianspaceweb.com/progress-ms-04.html#1210
They have concluded that the most probably cause was an engine related failure.

http://spaceflight101.com/progress-ms-04-roscosmos-mishap-report/

"The December 1 loss of the Progress MS-04 cargo spacecraft was most likely caused by a failure within the Soyuz rocket’s upper stage engine which caused the third stage oxidizer tank to rupture.

This conclusion for the most probable cause of the mishap was reached by an expert commission set up after the accident and shared by the Roscosmos State Corporation on Wednesday."

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

selvaarchi
2017-Jan-13, 03:31 PM
Two American astronauts did a space walk to replace the old batteries with new lithium-ion units.

http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/missions/iss/1st-battery-replacement-spacewalk-completed-at-iss/

"Two NASA astronauts on the first of two spacewalks outside the International Space Station (ISS) made swift work to help with the replacement of old batteries with new lithium-ion units. They even had enough time left over to perform several get-ahead tasks."

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk
They completed the replacement with the 2nd space walk.

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017/01/spacewalkers-upgrading-iss-batteries/

"Two astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) have completed a long-planned process to upgrade the power storage batteries outside the station. The upgraded batteries will give the ISS better power storage capacity throughout the rest of its planned lifetime. The second spacewalk comes one week after the first – highly successful – EVA."

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

selvaarchi
2017-Feb-07, 12:21 PM
Now NASA has confirmed that the ISS will get a new commercial air lock in 2019.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/02/the-international-space-station-will-get-a-new-private-airlock-in-2019/

"NASA has given a small, Houston-based company the green light to move ahead with development of a private airlock that will be attached to the International Space Station. The large, half-cylinder-shaped airlock, about two meters in diameter and 1.8 meters long, would become the first permanent commercial addition to the orbiting laboratory.

Ars first reported development of the commercial airlock a year ago, but now the company, Nanoracks, has made substantial progress toward flying the device in 2019. In addition to approval from NASA, the company has reached an agreement with Boeing to manufacture and install a “berthing mechanism” that connects pressurized modules of the space station."

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

selvaarchi
2017-Feb-17, 12:03 AM
After 9 years of operation ISS solar payload shuts down.

https://spaceflight101.com/solar-end-of-mission/

"ESA on Wednesday switched off a highly successful instrument package on the International Space Station that had been continuously watching over solar activity for the past nine years. Solar – built for a planned mission of one and a half years – had surpassed all expectations and delivered a vast amount of data for a better understanding of solar dynamics and Earth’s energy budget.

Solar’s prime mission objective was to measure the solar spectrum with unprecedented accuracy to gain very accurate knowledge of the ‘solar constant’ and its variations – an extremely important parameter when assessing the total input of energy into the Earth-Atmosphere System for studies of atmospheric dynamics and Earth’s energy cycle. Scientists never expected Solar to collect data for nearly an entire solar cycle, but the instrument package showed stellar performance, measuring the spectral distribution of 99% of incoming solar energy."

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

Glom
2017-Feb-17, 08:09 AM
Space experiments often exceed their stated expectations when given a chance. I think proposals should start being a little bit more optimistic. Might help getting approved.

crosscountry
2017-Feb-17, 05:44 PM
Actually, that's the opposite of what happens. If a mission proposes to go 10 years, NASA review panels will ding them for high risk and high cost. Proposing a 2 year mission is a lot cheaper and less risky than a 10 year mission. If the equipment continues to work well the project can propose more time in extended missions.

NASA rarely guarantees money for long durations. They are so constrained by congress and the president that any promise of long duration is a risk itself.

Glom
2017-Feb-17, 07:42 PM
Okay.

That's explains why so many experiments exceed expectations. Proposers are sandbagging.

crosscountry
2017-Feb-20, 07:34 PM
Well, they hope so anyway. Another way to look at it is that they're hedging their bets.

publiusr
2017-Feb-24, 10:42 PM
It looks like SLS/Orion may visit ISS
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017/02/investigating-potential-crew-sls-maiden-flight/

Remember, there was a five meter water cube calorimeter planed to fly on Ares V. That might allow a lot of water for ISS--for all kinds of things.

Glom
2017-Feb-25, 08:34 AM
This was causing some outrage in the forum as it smacked of Kruschev type space stunts.

publiusr
2017-Feb-25, 06:23 PM
Theve needed a robust lifeboat up there for awhile.
Some have it that the X-37 is back after over 600 days in space
https://sputniknews.com/military/201702181050807375-air-force-classified-spaceplane-return/

That's longer than most any capsule left up there. Maybe a case for X-37C

Extravoice
2017-Feb-28, 02:15 AM
Well, they hope so anyway. Another way to look at it is that they're hedging their bets.

Things that fly in space also tend to be over-engineered.
Design constraints that reduce the probability of failure during the primary mission tend to also tend to increase longevity.

selvaarchi
2017-Mar-10, 10:30 AM
At last NASA is putting in more effort in researching how to grow crops in space. The Chinese already have a plan for their space station to generate most of their oxygen and food needs from plants.

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/New_Plant_Habitat_Will_Increase_Harvest_on_Interna tional_Space_Station_999.html


A new, nearly self-sufficient plant growth system by NASA is headed to the International Space Station soon and will help researchers better understand how plants grow in space. The Advanced Plant Habitat will be used to conduct plant bioscience research on the space station, and help NASA prepare crew to grow their own food in space during deep-space exploration missions.

selvaarchi
2017-Apr-27, 09:41 AM
NASA has a problem with the spacsuits it has currently for use on the ISS according to an audit.

http://www.spacepolicyonline.com/news/space-station-spacesuits-suffer-after-shuttle-shutdown

"NASA's Office of Inspector General (OIG) released a report today assessing NASA's management of its existing spacesuits and development of new models. It expressed concern about Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuits used on the International Space Station (ISS) for extravehicular activity (EVAs, or spacewalks, which cannot be returned to Earth easily for maintenance following termination of the space shuttle program. As for new spacesuits, NASA Headquarters was criticized for continuing one contract for 5 years after Johnson Space Center recommended its termination. Overall, the OIG is concerned whether NASA will have the spacesuits it needs in the next decade."

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Glom
2017-Apr-28, 01:41 PM
NASA not having continuity in capability? How uncharacteristic.

publiusr
2017-Apr-30, 08:12 PM
That's going to change--give it time. Saturn to Shuttle took a long time. I would have kept Saturn IB and Apollo flying along with shuttle--but I'm not king of the world

selvaarchi
2017-Jun-01, 01:10 PM
China will be conducting scientific experiments on the ISS.

https://america.cgtn.com/2017/05/31/us-chinese-scientists-collaborate-on-historic-space-experiment

"Scientists from the Beijing Institute of Technology are putting the finishing touches on an experiment that will be conducted in the unforgiving environment of space.

It’s work that will help determine whether humans can survive a prolonged journey in space-where astronauts are bombarded with ten times the radiation levels on earth.

“Space radiation could cause harm to the astronauts, especially when they are in space for a long period of time. One of the biggest risks from space flight is gene mutation, we hope to do more research on this and learn how big the risk of gene mutation is for humans in space.”, Deng Yulin of the School of Life Science at BIT said.

Potentially ground-breaking research but Professor Deng, and his team have already made history. Despite the fact, there is a strict U.S. law that prohibits NASA from doing work with China – this will be the first Chinese experiment ever flown on the International Space Station."

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selvaarchi
2017-Jun-15, 02:16 AM
The ISS was buzzed by a spy satellite.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/06/a-spy-satellite-buzzed-the-space-station-this-month-and-no-one-knows-why/

"About six weeks ago, SpaceX launched a spy satellite into low Earth orbit from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. As is normal for National Reconnaissance Office launches, not much information was divulged about the satellite's final orbit or its specific purpose in space. However, a dedicated group of ground-based observers continued to track the satellite after it reached outer space.

Then something curious happened. In early June, the satellite made an extremely close pass to the International Space Station. One of the amateur satellite watchers, Ted Molczan, estimated the pass on June 3 to be 4.4km directly above the station. Another, Marco Langbroek, pegged the distance at 6.4km. "I am inclined to believe that the close conjunctions between USA 276 and ISS are intentional, but this remains unproven and far from certain," Molczan later wrote."

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Swift
2017-Jun-15, 12:54 PM
The ISS was buzzed by a spy satellite.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/06/a-spy-satellite-buzzed-the-space-station-this-month-and-no-one-knows-why/

"About six weeks ago, SpaceX launched a spy satellite into low Earth orbit from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. As is normal for National Reconnaissance Office launches, not much information was divulged about the satellite's final orbit or its specific purpose in space. However, a dedicated group of ground-based observers continued to track the satellite after it reached outer space.

Then something curious happened. In early June, the satellite made an extremely close pass to the International Space Station. One of the amateur satellite watchers, Ted Molczan, estimated the pass on June 3 to be 4.4km directly above the station. Another, Marco Langbroek, pegged the distance at 6.4km. "I am inclined to believe that the close conjunctions between USA 276 and ISS are intentional, but this remains unproven and far from certain," Molczan later wrote."

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From the linked article

Another option is that of a deliberate close flyby, perhaps to test or calibrate an onboard sensor to observe something or some kind of activity on the International Space Station. "The deliberate explanation seems more likely, except that I would have expected the satellite to maneuver after the encounter," McDowell said. "But it seems to have stayed in the same orbit."

I have a different idea for a deliberate flyby. If they were testing the ability to place their spy satellite close to another satellite in orbit (either to monitor it, intercept information from it, or destroy it) what better way to do that than to do it with a large object in-orbit that they have very precise information on its location. Or if they were testing the spy satellites ability to observe or intercept information from another satellite, the ISS would be a good test bed.

selvaarchi
2017-Jun-15, 01:33 PM
ESA is investigating how we keep our body rhythm in space.

http://m.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Research/Keeping_the_rhythm_in_space

"Space is an inhospitable environment for the human body but we adapt remarkably well. Within hours, the brain adjusts to the lack of an up or down, as if floating is all it has ever known. Now researchers are learning how our internal clock similarly adjusts to the restrictions of space. An ESA-sponsored experiment has found that while you can take the body out of Earth, you can’t take an Earth-based rhythm out of the body. "

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selvaarchi
2017-Jun-18, 03:04 AM
We have not heard much with what Japan is doing with their Kibo module on the ISS. Here is one repot of their activities.

http://global.jaxa.jp/press/2017/06/20170609_protein.html

"PeptiDream Inc. (PeptiDream), a Tokyo-based public biopharmaceutical company, and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), a national research and development agency, has established a strategic partnership for the High-Quality Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) experiment on the Japanese Experimental Module ("Kibo") of the International Space Station (ISS). This strategic partnership agreement (this Agreement) is a renewal of the current fee-based contract and represents a further expansion of the relationship between PeptiDream and JAXA. Under this Agreement, the number of experimental protein samples to be investigated is increased six-fold over the original agreement, and the term is further extended from August 2017 to August 2020.

PeptiDream and JAXA originally entered into a fee-based Agreement in February 2016. Under this original Agreement, JAXA has crystallized the HER2 receptor with a non-standard cyclic peptide (the drug candidate) provided by PeptiDream. The first space experiment was conducted on Kibo from February to March 2017, followed by diffraction data measurement and structure determination. The crystal (of the HER2-peptide complex) grown in space gave a substantially higher resolution than those crystals attained on the ground. The crystal structure clearly showed the macrocyclic drug candidate bound to the HER2 receptor and revealed an unprecedented binding mode. These results provide critical information that PeptiDream can now use to further optimize the HER2 targeting macrocyclic peptide candidate and accelerate its development.

The Strategic Partnership Agreement between PeptiDream and JAXA leverages each other's strengths. Utilizing Kibo as an "Drug-design supporting platform", PeptiDream and JAXA strive to obtain structural information on target proteins and their drug candidates swiftly and efficiently, aiming to produce best-in-class and first-in-class drugs for the world as well as Japan."

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selvaarchi
2017-Jun-18, 03:20 AM
Report of other experiments being carried out on the ISS.

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170614005276/en/Zero-Gravity-Solutions-Announces-Successful-Results-Seedling

"Zero Gravity Solutions, Inc. (“ZGSI” or the “Company”) (Pink Sheets: ZGSI), an agricultural biotechnology public company announced favorable results from the previously announced educational research experiment using its BAM-FX micronutrient product on the International Space Station (ISS). A second educational experiment utilizing BAM-FX®, launched to the ISS aboard the SpaceX 11 Cargo Mission to the International Space Station on June 3, 2017 has reached the ISS."

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selvaarchi
2017-Jul-04, 02:22 PM
From the linked article


I have a different idea for a deliberate flyby. If they were testing the ability to place their spy satellite close to another satellite in orbit (either to monitor it, intercept information from it, or destroy it) what better way to do that than to do it with a large object in-orbit that they have very precise information on its location. Or if they were testing the spy satellites ability to observe or intercept information from another satellite, the ISS would be a good test bed.
The latest issue of Space Review has an article on the close encounter.

http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3277/1

"On May 25, this author first drew attention to the fact that USA 276, if it did not change its orbit, would physically pass close to the ISS around June 3–4. Initial estimates for this approach (or rather a series of approaches), based on a NASA-prognosed orbit for the ISS and a periodically updated orbit for USA 276 from amateur observations, suggested that USA 276 would pass within 20 kilometers of the ISS in the afternoon of June 3. It would later transpire that it actually came even closer."

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reject
2017-Jul-06, 12:01 AM
The ISS was buzzed by a spy satellite.

And it seems their defence capabilities were found severely wanting.

slang
2017-Jul-06, 05:27 AM
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3277/1

Could that possibly be the same JimO (https://forum.cosmoquest.org/member.php?956-JimO) in the comments?

publiusr
2017-Jul-07, 09:41 PM
More on that flyby
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3277/1

A quote:
"It took three weeks for the payload to be discovered in orbit"

Thus my concern here: https://forum.cosmoquest.org/showthread.php?165611-Artificial-satellites-and-ISS&p=2410277#post2410277

ToSeek
2017-Jul-12, 06:28 PM
Could that possibly be the same JimO (https://forum.cosmoquest.org/member.php?956-JimO) in the comments?

Our JimO is definitely James Oberg. I lost a few arguments about space exploration with him, which doesn't happen too often. ;)

selvaarchi
2017-Jul-18, 09:00 PM
See results from Japan's drone operating in the ISS.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-40640039

"Japan's space agency has released the first images taken by a drone it operates on the International Space Station (ISS).
The so-called Internal Ball Camera drone was sent to take pictures and video of the work of the astronauts.
The drone can float in a zero-gravity environment and is operated from earth.
Dubbed a little ball of cuteness floating about in space it has been offering a window into life on the ISS."

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selvaarchi
2017-Oct-26, 11:27 AM
Forbes carries an article on the pro and cons of keeping the ISS.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/gregautry/2017/10/25/the-space-station-should-it-stay-or-should-it-go-now/#27fe9836dce4

"The International Space Station (ISS) circles the globe every 90 minutes. Drifting quiescently over the blue sphere of Earth or posing against the black of space, the starkly beautiful station feels like a permanent element in the celestial dance. Those of us who know when and where to look often watch it pass overhead, one of the brightest lights in the evening sky. However, few are aware that the venerable ISS, born with the millennium, is scheduled to be abandoned in 2024 and will suffer a fiery deorbit, breakup and unceremonious splash into the Pacific."

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publiusr
2017-Oct-31, 09:08 PM
Some ideas on the use of ISS
https://denniswingo.wordpress.com/2017/02/19/architecture-notes-for-sustainable-and-affordable-exploration/

selvaarchi
2017-Dec-06, 10:41 AM
ISS has within it thousands of species that call it home.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2017/12/05/the-international-space-station-is-super-germy/?utm_term=.130db86c0b04


Thousands of species have colonized the International Space Station — and only one of them is Homo sapiens.

According to a new study in the journal PeerJ, the interior surfaces of the 17-year-old, 250-mile-high, airtight space station harbor at least 1,000 and perhaps more than 4,000 microbe species — a finding that is actually “reassuring,” according to co-author David Coil.

“Diversity is generally associated with a healthy ecosystem,” said the University of California at Davis microbiologist. A varied population of microscopic inhabitants is probably a signature of a healthy spacecraft, he added. And as humanity considers even longer ventures in space — such as an 18-month voyage to Mars — scientists must understand who these microbes are.

selvaarchi
2017-Dec-18, 11:48 AM
More studies of generating oxygen using plants being carried out at the ISS.

Wonder if the Chinese published any of their results the carried out in space?

http://www.marsdaily.com/reports/Planting_oxygen_ensures_a_breath_of_fresh_air_999. html


When resources are limited, you have to work with what you have - especially in the harsh environment of space. Though the International Space Station is regularly restocked by cargo vessels, like today's Dragon, self-sufficient spaceflight in the future will require us to recycle and reuse precious resources like oxygen. An experiment on its way to space will look into doing just that.

Researchers are studying how photosynthesis - the process by which organisms convert light into energy, producing oxygen as a byproduct - takes place in space.

They loaded the microalgae Arthrospira, commonly known as spirulina, into a photobioreactor, a kind of cylinder bathed in light. On the Space Station, carbon dioxide will be transformed by photosynthesis into oxygen and edible biomass such as proteins.

selvaarchi
2017-Dec-22, 11:36 AM
Russia wants to add a 5 star hotel module to the ISS.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/space/satellites/a14471796/luxury-hotel-iss/


Space tourism isn't a new idea. SpaceX announced plans this year to send civilians skyward and Virgin Galactic is still working toward its goal of regular space flights. Just this week, Blue Origin released footage of its future space tourism ambitions. But all these plans aren't exactly a first-class experience. Even after paying millions, a few super-wealthy adventurers have to brave spartan accommodations in orbit alongside well-trained astronauts.

But in a few years, space tourism agents might be offering five-star orbital adventures, courtesy of the Russian space agency. The amenities will include a luxury orbital suite parked at the International Space Station (ISS) offering private cabins with big windows, personal hygiene facilities, exercise equipment and even Wi-Fi. In addition gazing at our tiny blue orb from a dizzying altitude of 400 miles, space tourists will have an opportunity for space walks accompanied by a professional cosmonaut.

The entire trip, lasting from one to two weeks will cost $40 million per person and going with the spacewalk option and an extended month-long stay will set the traveler back an additional $20 million.

selvaarchi
2018-Jan-09, 02:25 AM
Former NASA astronaut Michael Foale wants private companies to step in and take over the running of the ISS in 2024.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/space/satellites/a14781627/former-nasa-astronaut-companies-could-need-to-run-the-iss-or-let-it-crash-in-2024/


For almost two decades, the International Space Station (ISS) has been a shining example of international cooperation in the name of scientific research. But a former astronaut warns that the space station, which has been continually inhabited since November 2, 2000, could be abandoned and deorbited if additional funding for the mission is not found.

A veteran of six space missions, veteran NASA astronaut Michael Foale has spent over a year in space, living on both the Soviet/Russian Mir space station and the ISS. In a recent interview with the BBC, Foale expressed concerns about the current plan to deorbit the ISS in 2024, sending it to disintegrate over the Pacific Ocean.

“Year by year, Russia is launching the fuel to fill up the tanks of the ISS service module to enable the space station to be deorbited,” Foale said to the BBC. “That’s the current plan–I think it’s a bad plan, a massive waste of a fantastic resource.”

selvaarchi
2018-Feb-03, 04:18 AM
Russian astronauts broke their own record doing an EVA to replace a very old communications gear that was not designed for replacement.

https://spaceflight101.com/russian-eva-44-successfully-completed-outside-iss/


Two Russian Cosmonauts had a trial of patience on Friday when working on the Service Module of the International Space Station to replace antiquated communications gear with new electronics to enable the Russian ISS Segment to connect to Russia’s Luch satellites positioned in Geostationary Orbit as high-altitude relay points.

Veteran spacewalkers Aleksandr Misurkin and Anton Shkaplerov spent eight hours and 13 minutes outside the Station, facing a task involving a high-gain antenna not designed to be serviced by spacewalking crew members. Dealing with tight clearances, tedious bolt manipulation and numerous electrical & data connectors, the duo successfully removed an out-of-date electronics box and threw it overboard as a means of disposal before installing a new & improved unit that is compatible with the current generation of Luch relay satellites to give ISS additional downlink bandwidth and support the constantly-growing data stream from the orbiting complex.

selvaarchi
2018-May-16, 01:37 PM
NASA has been requested to study how to reduce the crew size on the ISS.

http://spacenews.com/advisory-committee-asks-nasa-to-develop-plans-for-reduced-iss-crew/


A NASA advisory committee, concerned about delays in the development of commercial crew systems, wants the agency to look at options where the International Space Station is operated with a reduced crew.

At a May 14 meeting of the ISS Advisory Committee, its chairman, Thomas Stafford, said that NASA should consider training Russian cosmonauts on key systems in what’s known as the U.S. Operating Segment (USOS) portion of the ISS, which includes elements from the U.S., Europe, Japan and Canada, in the event extended commercial crew development delays reduce the size of the station’s crew.

“For years, we have observed delays after delays in the development, flight test and qualification milestones in commercial crew, and therefore we believe the current schedule is optimistic,” Stafford said of schedules that call for flight tests of commercial crew vehicles in the latter half of 2018.

His committee recommended that NASA and the other ISS partners should plan for ways to operate the station with a reduced crew if commercial crew vehicles aren’t ready to enter service by the fall of 2019.

selvaarchi
2018-May-17, 02:43 PM
NASA’s inspector general, Paul Martin, opinion is, the plan to hand the International Space Station off to the private sector by 2025 probably a non starter.

https://www.theverge.com/2018/5/16/17362004/nasa-international-space-station-transition-private-space-industry-2025


The Trump Administration’s plan to hand the International Space Station off to the private sector by 2025 probably won’t work, says a government auditor. It’s unlikely that any commercial companies will be able to take on the enormous costs of operating the ISS within the next six years, the auditor said.

NASA’s inspector general, Paul Martin, laid out his concerns over the space station’s transition during a Senate space subcommittee hearing May 16th, helmed by Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) and Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL). During his testimony, Martin said that there’s just no “sufficient business case” for space companies to take on the ISS’s yearly operations costs, which are expected to reach $1.2 billion in 2024. The industries that would need the ISS, such as space tourism or space research and development, haven’t panned out yet, he noted. Plus, the private space industry hasn’t been very enthusiastic about using the ISS either — for research or for profit. “Candidly, the scant commercial interest shown in the station over its nearly 20 years of operation gives us pause about the agency’s current plans,” Martin said at the hearing.

selvaarchi
2018-May-19, 01:32 PM
US House Committee looked at US future in LEO and struggle to come out with an answer. One option not looked at was using China's Space Station and the US concentrating on the space station around the moon.

https://spacepolicyonline.com/news/house-committee-struggles-with-u-s-future-in-leo/


The House Science, Space, and Technology Committee tackled the issue today of the future of the United States in low Earth orbit (LEO). Committee members and witnesses agreed that the United States needs to have a presence in LEO, but the questions are how long to maintain operations of the International Space Station (ISS) and when the commercial sector will be ready to assume the primary role of LEO operations to support human spaceflight. No easy answers emerged.


ISS is a partnership among the United States, Russia, Japan, Canada, and 11 European countries operating through the European Space Agency. The first ISS module, Zarya, was launched in 1998 and it took 12 years to complete construction. International crews have permanently occupied the facility since the end of 2000 rotating on roughly 4-6 month schedules. NASA spends $3-4 billion a year on ISS operations and, as Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA) elicited today, the international partners spend another $1-2 billion a year. That makes its annual operating costs about $4.5 – 5 billion, according to Bill Gerstenmaier, NASA’s Associate Administrator for Human Exploration and Operations.

At the same time, NASA and many of those partners want to move on to the Moon and Mars, another expensive endeavor. The question is what capabilities will continue to be needed in LEO and the relative roles of the government and the private sector.

Glom
2018-May-19, 01:52 PM
NASA has been requested to study how to reduce the crew size on the ISS.

http://spacenews.com/advisory-committee-asks-nasa-to-develop-plans-for-reduced-iss-crew/That is shocking.

Tom Stafford is still around?

selvaarchi
2018-May-26, 11:44 AM
NASA is set to test the ability of the Cygnus cargo craft to boost and deorbit the International Space Station.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason-davis/2018/20180525-cygnus-iss-boost-test.html


Yesterday morning, a Cygnus resupply spaceship pulled into port at the International Space Station, loaded with more than 3 metric tons of science, food, and equipment. Cygnus will stay at the ISS for two months while astronauts unload and refill it with trash. After undocking, Cygnus will fly to a higher orbit, deploy some CubeSats, and fling itself back into the atmosphere for destructive reentry in July. But before the cargo ship departs, NASA and Orbital ATK, which builds and flies Cygnus, want to try something new: using the spacecraft's thrusters to boost the station's altitude.

Glom
2018-May-26, 10:36 PM
Test its ability to boost, fine, but I wouldn't recommend testing its ability to deorbit.

selvaarchi
2018-Jul-08, 03:45 AM
Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), which was installed on the ISS, is major source of data which scientist hope to solve the source of dark matter by 2024.

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2018-07/07/c_137308909.htm


Scientists are expected to have a "decisive outcome" on search for the source of dark matter by 2024 after analyzing the huge amount of data on cosmic particles, said Nobel Prize winner Samuel Ting Saturday.

Ting, who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1976 for discovering the J meson nuclear particle, made the remarks at a press conference held in Shandong University in east China.

Ting leads the team that gathers particle data from Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) which was installed in international space station in 2011.

selvaarchi
2018-Aug-30, 02:53 PM
There has been a leak on the ISS. It was traced to a micro fracture on the on the Soyuz ship that brought astronauts to the ISS in June that brought astronauts to the ISS in June. It is being fixed from the inside by the astronauts.

My question - will a fix from the inside enable the Soyuz ship to withstand the intense heat on re-entry?

http://www.spacedaily.com/afp/180830125226.ut9wznkg.html


The International Space Station crew on Thursday was repairing a small "leak" most likely caused by a collision with a small meteorite, the head of the Russian space agency said, adding the incident presented no danger.
"Overnight and in the morning there was an abnormal situation -- a pressure drop, an oxygen leak at the station," Roscosmos chief Dmitry Rogozin was quoted as saying by Russian news agencies.

"A micro fracture was found, most likely it is damage from the outside. The design engineers believe it is the result of a micrometeorite," he said.

Glom
2018-Aug-30, 08:15 PM
No. It's in the orbital module, not the descent module.

selvaarchi
2018-Aug-31, 01:11 AM
No. It's in the orbital module, not the descent module.

Thanks, that is a relief.

KaiYeves
2018-Aug-31, 03:09 AM
The International Space Station’s cabin pressure is holding steady after the Expedition 56 crew conducted repair work on one of two Russian Soyuz spacecraft attached to the complex. The repair was made to address a leak that had caused a minor reduction of station pressure.

After a morning of investigations, the crew reported that the leak was isolated to a hole about two millimeters in diameter in the orbital compartment, or upper section, of the Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft attached to the Rassvet module of the Russian segment of the station.
(NASA: International Space Station Status (https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/08/30/international-space-station-status-3/))

Trebuchet
2018-Aug-31, 02:26 PM
What would be the effect had it been in the descent module? Do returning astronauts not wear suits anyhow?

Noclevername
2018-Aug-31, 04:02 PM
What would be the effect had it been in the descent module? Do returning astronauts not wear suits anyhow?

It might have let in some superheated plasma maybe?

schlaugh
2018-Aug-31, 04:20 PM
What would be the effect had it been in the descent module? Do returning astronauts not wear suits anyhow?

Depends on the rate of pressure loss. If it were a very slow leak then probably not much effect because the astronauts are (supposed to be) in the descent module for only a few hours, and suited. That said, a 2mm hole isn't trivial so they might have seen a significant drop in pressure, especially if they had to suspend reentry for a short while to work out some other problem. And as mentioned a hole could allow super-heated gas to enter the module; 2mm might grow to 20mm in a hurry.

Glom
2018-Aug-31, 06:34 PM
Nothing has ever gone wrong with a spacecraft re-entering with a hole in it.

selvaarchi
2018-Sep-01, 02:15 AM
What would be the effect had it been in the descent module? Do returning astronauts not wear suits anyhow?

You forgot what happened to Challenger? Unless they can fix the hole with heat shielding material, it will not come down to earth in one piece.

KaiYeves
2018-Sep-01, 02:47 AM
You forgot what happened to Challenger? Unless they can fix the hole with heat shielding material, it will not come down to earth in one piece.

That sounds more like the Columbia disaster, actually.

Trebuchet
2018-Sep-01, 03:01 AM
That sounds more like the Columbia disaster, actually.Yes, and that was a dinner-plate size hole in a wing, not 2mm in a pressure vessel.
It's a moot point, of course, as the damage was not in that module and the effect would depend on many other factors.

selvaarchi
2018-Sep-01, 08:44 AM
That sounds more like the Columbia disaster, actually.

Sorry my old age showing. That was Columbia and if you have a weakness in the hull with those extreme high temperatures, you are looking for trouble.

selvaarchi
2018-Sep-01, 05:58 PM
"Russia to End U.S. Space Station Rides in April"

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-08-31/russia-says-nasa-s-taxi-rides-to-space-station-will-end-in-april


Russia’s contract to supply Soyuz ferry rides for NASA astronauts to the International Space Station ends in April, Russian Deputy Prime Minister Yuri Borisov told reporters on Friday.

The expiration piles additional pressure on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to restore its own capability to shuttle U.S. crew members back and forth to the orbiting lab. The space agency is contracting with Boeing Co. and SpaceX to develop new vehicles to transport astronauts, but the work has been plagued by delays.

selvaarchi
2018-Sep-04, 10:41 AM
Cause of leak was due to ‘TECHNOLOGICAL ERROR’ states Roscosmos boss Dmitry Rogozin.

http://www.spaceflightinsider.com/missions/iss/roscosmos-boss-soyuz-pressure-leak-caused-by-technological-error/


Last week’s depressurization event at the International Space Station may have been caused by human error, not a micrometeoroid impact, Roscosmos boss Dmitry Rogozin told Russian media. The handling of the problem suggests a lack of proper oversight by the Russian space agency.

Roger E. Moore
2018-Sep-04, 02:07 PM
https://phys.org/news/2018-09-russia-space-station-leak-deliberate.html
Russia says space station leak could be deliberate sabotage
September 4, 2018

Russia launched checks Tuesday after its space chief said an air leak on the International Space Station last week could have been deliberate sabotage. Space agency chief Dmitry Rogozin said the hole detected Thursday in a Russian space craft docked at the orbiting station was caused by a drill and could have been done deliberately, either back on Earth or by astronauts in space. Astronauts used tape to seal the leak after it caused a small loss of pressure that was not life-threatening.
"There were several attempts at drilling," Rogozin said late Monday in televised comments. He added that the drill appeared to have been held by a "wavering hand." "What is this: a production defect or some premeditated actions?" he asked. "We are checking the Earth version. But there is another version that we do not rule out: deliberate interference in space."

schlaugh
2018-Sep-04, 07:41 PM
https://phys.org/news/2018-09-russia-space-station-leak-deliberate.html
Russia says space station leak could be deliberate sabotage
September 4, 2018

Russia launched checks Tuesday after its space chief said an air leak on the International Space Station last week could have been deliberate sabotage. Space agency chief Dmitry Rogozin said the hole detected Thursday in a Russian space craft docked at the orbiting station was caused by a drill and could have been done deliberately, either back on Earth or by astronauts in space. Astronauts used tape to seal the leak after it caused a small loss of pressure that was not life-threatening.

"There were several attempts at drilling," Rogozin said late Monday in televised comments. He added that the drill appeared to have been held by a "wavering hand." "What is this: a production defect or some premeditated actions?" he asked. "We are checking the Earth version. But there is another version that we do not rule out: deliberate interference in space."

He's suggesting that an astronaut or cosmonaut sabotaged the orbital module on station? Seriously?

Squink
2018-Sep-05, 03:24 PM
Picture attributed to NASA: https://www.engadget.com/2018/09/05/iss-drill-hole-nasa-roscosmos-sabotage/
Also at Washington Post (https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2018/09/05/russia-claims-that-someone-may-have-sabotaged-international-space-station/?utm_term=.9b89be8b4029) with NASA-Shutterstock link

selvaarchi
2018-Sep-29, 08:00 AM
Now a push by both the US House and Senate yo extend the ISS ti :rimshot: 2030.

https://spacenews.com/house-joins-senate-in-push-to-extend-iss/


A key House member announced Sept. 26 that he is introducing legislation that would extend operations of the International Space Station to 2030, weeks after senators sought a similar extension.

Roger E. Moore
2018-Oct-02, 04:15 PM
https://phys.org/news/2018-10-russia-iss-hole-deliberately-space.html

"Russian investigators looking into the origin of a hole that caused an oxygen leak on the International Space Station have said it was caused deliberately, the space agency chief said. A first commission had delivered its report, Dmitry Rogozin, the head of the Russian space agency Roskosmos, said in televised remarks late Monday."

Not going to comment further.

Swift
2018-Nov-20, 03:10 PM
cnet.com (https://www.cnet.com/news/at-20-the-international-space-station-remains-a-stellar-success-story/)


Twenty years ago, the most ambitious construction project in the history of the human race began with the launch of a Russian Proton rocket on Nov. 20, 1998. The uncrewed vehicle carried Zarya, a control module that would become the first piece of the International Space Station placed in orbit.

The first crew, consisting of American astronaut and former Navy SEAL Bill Shepherd alongside Russian cosmonauts Sergei Krikalev and Yuri Gidzenko, would arrive to live in orbit just under two years later on Oct. 30, 2000.


He points out the unprecedented hurdles involved, beginning with launching every module, nut, bolt and piece of framing required aboard a powerful rocket to a remote, empty and lethal location.

"Performing just one of these voyages safely was a major challenge but the station's design called for 30 of them just to deliver the station's basic building blocks. Against the odds, all arrived on orbit safely and flawlessly where they fitted together correctly and precisely."

I think we often forget how amazing an achievement it is.

KaiYeves
2018-Nov-20, 05:00 PM
cnet.com (https://www.cnet.com/news/at-20-the-international-space-station-remains-a-stellar-success-story/)



I think we often forget how amazing an achievement it is.

There are many people who have never known a time there weren’t at least three people in orbit.

selden
2018-Nov-20, 07:36 PM
Off topic: the "mindset list" of what college freshmen have always or never experienced always amazes me. And makes me feel even more ancient than I wish were the case.

Glom
2018-Nov-24, 04:33 PM
There are many people who have never known a time there weren’t at least three people in orbit.Even more people who have never known a time when there weren't at least two people in orbit.

Wasn't the crew downsized to two are STS 107?