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Fraser
2005-Jul-04, 07:37 PM
SUMMARY: What is the nature of the Universe in which we live? This is probably one of the most profound questions human beings can ask. And for the majority of human history, that question could only find answers in philosophy or religion; we lacked the tools to look deeply into the cosmos, to see what was going on. Enter the Big Bang, a theory of the Universe where everything began from a single point, and has been rapidly expanding ever since. In his latest book, Big Bang, Simon Singh explores the history and series of discoveries that have led astronomers and theorists to our current understanding of our place in an expanding Universe.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/book_review_big_bang_singh.html)

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

dshan
2005-Jul-05, 12:46 AM
It's very interesting that just as you wrote this review, and so soon after the book itself was published, New Scientist magazine have done a cover story "The End of The Beginning" (July 2, 2005) describing the apparently growing dissent amongst at least some astronomers, astrophysicists and cosmologists about the big bang and if it ever really happened. It's a fascinating article and it shows that the big bang has lots (it's critics say an ever increasing number) of assumptions and arbitary settings. In addition there are an increasing number of so far inexplicable observations that seem to undermine it's claims. It's interesting that as the big bang's supporters add dark energy to dark matter and both those to a seemingly arbitary "inflation" event the increasing complexity of, and patches to, the big bang theory are making it look more and more like the old Copernician model of the solar system you mention in your review! Even the latest WMAP results seem to be less than an overwhelming endorsement of some of the big bang's predictiions.

I'd still have to say the big bang looks like the best bet for the origin of the universe, but it's not the open and shut case we've thought it was over the last thirty years or so -- at the very least it's considerably more complicated than the original "simple" big bang model.

Everyone interested in cosmology should read the New Scientist article (it's available online at www.newscientist.com but only for premium content subscribers unfortunately).

om@umr.edu
2005-Jul-05, 04:14 AM
Hi, Dshan.

You have summarized the diversity of opinions well.

I attended the "First Crisis in Cosmology Conference" in Portugal.

I will try to find a copy of the New Scientist article to post here.

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om

antoniseb
2005-Jul-05, 12:35 PM
Originally posted by om@umr.edu@Jul 5 2005, 04:14 AM
I will try to find a copy of the New Scientist article to post here.
Please be careful to make sure it's a legal copy.

Lainie121
2005-Jul-05, 10:37 PM
:D NASA's Deep Impact Mission was a success? Will the debris and fotos of Comet Tempel 1 show us the true origin of the Universe?

antoniseb
2005-Jul-05, 10:44 PM
Originally posted by Lainie@Jul 5 2005, 10:37 PM
NASA's Deep Impact Mission was a success? Will the debris and fotos of Comet Tempel 1 show us the true origin of the Universe?
Is that the only measure of success? If so, nothing mankind has yet done is a success.

om@umr.edu
2005-Jul-05, 11:40 PM
Originally posted by Lainie@Jul 5 2005, 10:37 PM
1. NASA's Deep Impact Mission was a success?

2.Will the debris and fotos of Comet Tempel 1 show us the true origin of the Universe?
Hi, Lainie.

1. The Deep Impact Mission was very successful PR (public relations) for NASA. It brought the American public together during a nationalistic celebration and clearly demonstrated great engineering ability that may have practical value in diverting incoming asteroids, comets, or warheads ("Star Wars").

2. Debris and photos of Comet Tempel 1 will probably provide no useful information on the origin of the Universe or the Solar System. Quantitative measurements on elements and/or isotopes in the debris might have advanced these fields of study.

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om

om@umr.edu
2005-Jul-06, 09:11 PM
Hi, Dshan.

The New Scientist (http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=mg18625061.800) article is available here.

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om

dshan
2005-Jul-06, 10:47 PM
Originally posted by om@umr.edu@Jul 6 2005, 09:11 PM
Hi, Dshan.

The New Scientist (http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=mg18625061.800) article is available here.

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om
Oliver,

Yes I know that. The problem is that, as I said in my original posting, you have to be a NS Premium Subscriber to read it...

om@umr.edu
2005-Jul-06, 11:48 PM
Originally posted by dshan+Jul 6 2005, 10:47 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (dshan &#064; Jul 6 2005, 10:47 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-om@umr.edu@Jul 6 2005, 09:11 PM
Hi, Dshan.

The New Scientist (http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=mg18625061.800) article is available here.

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om
Oliver,

Yes I know that. The problem is that, as I said in my original posting, you have to be a NS Premium Subscriber to read it... [/b][/quote]
Hi, dshan.

I can send you a news report (Word document) of the CCC1 conference if you send me your e-mail address. But I can&#39;t post that here.

Oliver
om@umr.edu

Guest_Hilton Ratcliffe
2005-Jul-26, 05:05 PM
Hi Dshan

I also attended the First Crisis in Cosmology Conference, and have written a report for posting on Universe Today. I&#39;ve e-mailed Fraser about it and am awaiting a reply from him. Also, I have the text of the NS article and one that appeared in Physics World. I could send them directly to you if you&#39;re interested.

Hilton
Astronomical Society of South Africa
ratcliff@iafrica.com