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Fraser
2005-Jul-11, 05:21 PM
SUMMARY: The Japanese space agency JAXA announced the successful launch of the ASTRO-E2 X-ray satellite on Sunday. A Japanese-built M-5 rocket blasted off from the Uchinoura Space Center carrying the Astro-E2 into orbit. This satellite, renamed Suzuka, is a replacement for the Astro-E satellite, which was destroyed because of a launch failure in 2000. Once it's operational, Suzuka will help astronomers understand the evolution of galaxies and the supermassive black holes at their centres.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/launch_result_mv6.html)

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

om@umr.edu
2005-Jul-11, 05:28 PM
Thanks, Fraser.

I would like more information on the measurements that will be taken to help us "understand the evolution of galaxies and the supermassive black holes at their centres."

I couldn't find any details.

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om

antoniseb
2005-Jul-11, 05:39 PM
its scheduled orbit of an apogee altitude of approximately 247 km and a perigee altitude of approximately 560 km

This probably needs to get updated, even if the Japanese press release has it this way. Perigee should be the lower number.

antoniseb
2005-Jul-11, 05:50 PM
Originally posted by om@umr.edu@Jul 11 2005, 05:28 PM
I would like more information on the measurements that will be taken to help us "understand the evolution of galaxies and the supermassive black holes at their centres."
There have been a few papers talking about the capabilities and hopes for this mission, but in short, it uses a different technology for xray spectroscopy that should also work for low energy gammas, that is capable of making spectra with about ten times the energy resolution of the equipement in Chandra and XMM-Newton.

Many of the proposals for using this tool involve looking at the spectra from galactic centers, and supernova remnants, hoping to get more detail on the nuclei and highly ionized species giving off these rays, including perhaps more detailed insight as to the chemical makeup and dynamics of accretion disks.

If you have some other ideas about how to use this device to advance our understanding, you should certainly make a proposal.

Don Alexander
2005-Jul-11, 06:22 PM
If you have some other ideas about how to use this device to advance our understanding, you should certainly make a proposal.

This was not, I take it, adressed to the typical UT forum reader, right?

I'd like to know about the slewing capabilities of the satellite. It's high spectral resolution would make it a good tool to research bright X-ray afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts and look for high energy emission lines and absorption features - these can be used for redshift determination.

antoniseb
2005-Jul-11, 06:29 PM
Originally posted by Don Alexander@Jul 11 2005, 06:22 PM
This was not, I take it, adressed to the typical UT forum reader, right?

No, it was aimed specifically at Dr. Oliver Manuel, Professor Emeritus of nuclear chemistry at UMR.

I don't think that the system could support all forum members submitting proposals.