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bossman20081
2005-Jul-12, 04:10 AM
I would really love to be one of two things, and astronomer or an astronaut. An astronaust is near impossible so I am looking at astronomy more. I was thinking I would go for a doctorate in physics to become an astronomer. Well, astronomy isn't exactly a guarantee, so I was wondering what other jobs I could get with a doctorate in physics.

I have no idea where to look for help, so I posted this here; can anybody help? :unsure:

astromark
2005-Jul-12, 08:12 AM
Teacher.

QJones
2005-Jul-12, 02:30 PM
Don't disregard engineering - it's extremely valuable. I would take an engineering degree first, and then go for the doctorate in physics. This means that you will be much more employable if your doctorate peters out. As well, when you're making your fancy theories, you'll also be qualified to make the devices to measure your fancy theories. Push the technology curve while pushing the knowledge curve!

piersdad
2005-Jul-12, 08:33 PM
Don't disregard engineering - it's extremely valuable
agree there completely
i was trained in engineering as well as electrical and can both understand or make anything i want to within limits of costs.
haveing an engineering background enables to to at least help bring the theoretical part to fruition.

no use asking an engineer to make a wiggle-woggle when you want an eccentric ballraced crankshaft

bossman20081
2005-Jul-12, 10:39 PM
Originally posted by QJones@Jul 12 2005, 11:00 AM
Don't disregard engineering - it's extremely valuable. I would take an engineering degree first, and then go for the doctorate in physics. This means that you will be much more employable if your doctorate peters out. As well, when you're making your fancy theories, you'll also be qualified to make the devices to measure your fancy theories. Push the technology curve while pushing the knowledge curve!
What do you recommend, a bachelors or a masters degree in engineering?

aeolus
2005-Jul-13, 02:25 AM
start with the bachelors, and if you like it, do a masters. Don't be too rigid with your planning though; things change. I was in engineering, but decided it wasnt for me. (I had my mind set on it since I was 9)

bossman20081
2005-Jul-15, 02:06 AM
Thanks for the advice, Aeolus. I will keep that in mind.

I just want to have a good idea of what I'm going to do after high school, after all, this is this time to think about it, is it not? Anyway, I have a good idea of what I'm going to do, I just don't want to limit my options. Just to let you know, I've wanted to be an astronaut since before I was 5.

aeolus
2005-Jul-15, 05:45 AM
Youll never get anywhere if you dont know where youre going. To get somewhere, you have to have a destination, or else you'll never leave where you are.

Start in New York. Then decide where you want to go. Arizona, you say? Well good then. You can't just hop in a car and drive to Arizona. You have to plan what routes are going to get you there. So now get the state maps to get you along the way. Now you're set: you have long term goals, and short term goals to get you there. You want to get to Arizona, the hot, rich land of Arizona.

Maybe you'll follow your intended route while you're driving there, you'll arrive, and it will be everything you wanted it to be.

But maybe you'll be driving through the Mississippi lowlands and fall in love with something you'd never even heard of before. Don't be afraid to change paths and end up in New Orleans if your heart leads you there.

Whatever the case, as long as you have fun with the journey, the destination will end up worth the while.

(btw, to leave the analogy and get back to specifics, you need a bachelors in order to go for a masters)

kashi
2005-Jul-15, 09:41 AM
Keep in mind that you'll probably change your mind several times between now and the time you go to University.

damienpaul
2005-Jul-15, 10:35 AM
Originally posted by kashi@Jul 15 2005, 07:11 PM
Keep in mind that you'll probably change your mind several times between now and the time you go to University.
and many more times while in University

tater1337
2005-Jul-15, 12:39 PM
Originally posted by bossman20081@Jul 12 2005, 04:10 AM
I would really love to be one of two things, and astronomer or an astronaut. An astronaust is near impossible so I am looking at astronomy more. I was thinking I would go for a doctorate in physics to become an astronomer. Well, astronomy isn't exactly a guarantee, so I was wondering what other jobs I could get with a doctorate in physics.

I have no idea where to look for help, so I posted this here; can anybody help? :unsure:
astronauts will not be near impossible. I am working on it :)

ummm, I am a bit out of the colledge loop, but aren't there numerous physics disciplines?


my opinion? get a multipurpose degree. standard enginnering is good, as it does work with physics, can bend towards astronautics or astronomics(?). I'd go with a bachelors or masters rather than a a full PhD.

(note: I have an AS in EE. very good multipurpose degree)

Ola D.
2005-Jul-16, 07:24 PM
Originally posted by kashi@Jul 15 2005, 09:41 AM
Keep in mind that you'll probably change your mind several times between now and the time you go to University.
That's right! Two years ago, I wanted Architecture, then changed my mind. At the beginning of this year, I was planning on either Physics or Electrical Engineering. College starts in Oct., and I am going for Physics. But still, I'll keep the door open for chances.

Draw your plan and try to stick to it, but expect a few turns that'll possibly lead you to a different place.

Bottom line, with time you'll change your views and probably goals, don't get very solid about it. Asking a few professionals - in both fields- will be helpful too.

D Wittman
2005-Jul-16, 09:02 PM
Gravity not a force just a result of waves of strings that intereact to form particles (just hugher forms of energy) we accept some as matter. the dips in thwe waves as they interact we see the result as gravity. There is no time nor matter just waves of energy.

We see lights bulb blink on and off on a strip sign around a building and if the sequence is correct it appears as some object is moving - this is similiar to waves -these energy waves at any assigned spot (no dimmnssion) intereact with other waves - multiple waves interacting are multi dimenssions. On our dimenssion awareness we perceive matter - perception and reality not one in the same. :wacko:

bossman20081
2005-Jul-17, 04:20 AM
Kashi, Damo, and Ola-

I understand where you're coming from, but I am 99.9999999% (close enough to 100% for me) sure I am going after a career in astronomy or any other career related to astronomy. Simply put, astronomy is my passion; nothing else has interested me nearly as much. To my current understanding of it, physics seems like the best route to that career.

I accept that I may change my mind, but I wouldn't hold my breathe if I were you.

D Wittman-

What are you talking about?

Algenon the mouse
2005-Jul-18, 10:55 PM
All the sciences seem to connect at some point. Whitman is just talking about one of the theories that deals with space. You probably need to think what it is about Astronmy that excites you...and then connect it to a similar area here on Earth.

StarLab
2005-Jul-18, 11:10 PM
Well, let's think...physicist or astronomer....

Physicist: first think of those people working in particle accelerators. That's one kind of physicist. There there are physics teachers (but don't consider that below you yet - Einstein was a physics teacher at Princeton for a long, long while - these guys get the most publicity). Don't forget the physicits who work with NASA, or with the army, or simply by themselves, doing mathematical equation after mathematical equation. Finally, there are physicists who deal with mostly engineering-based physics. A lotta choices out there.

Astronomy: you have to be careful here. Remember there's a few important kinds - skywatching (the guys at Keck, and also your amateur astronomy neighbors who do it only as a hobby). Then, the other two important kinds are cosmology and astrophysics. That's the whole QM vs. Relativity thing, and string theory, and all that - which promptly ties into physics as Theoretical Physics. Skywatching is really a strange job - most people who claim they wanna become astronomers when they're older really just become Amateur skywatchers, a hobby rather than a profession. But don't forget, the Professional astronomer thing involves learning about NGC, type 1a supernovae, right ascension, seasonal skies and constellations, etc.

The best approach really is to just start researching each of these fields and deciding which one fits you best. The other is to be patient, because a lot can change over the next few years, as you are an incoming sophomore and have three years of high school ahead of you. So start looking around, but be patient, wary, and above all keep an open mind.

-StarLab ;)

rahuldandekar
2005-Jul-19, 01:40 AM
Very good suggestions there, Starlab. :)

That's exactly what I considered, the difference between Physicists and Astronomers, and I made up my mind to be a physcist. But a lot can change when I graduate from college, and maybe I'll go for Masters In Astronomy, instead of Masters in Physics. I'll have to research into both fields, find out how enjoyable atronomy is (my college has an astronomy club... through which I can gain some experience of Astronomy). At least until now, physics has been enjoyable.

But a lot depends on these college years. Who knows, my outlook towards astronomy may change and I might find it superior to physics!

In other words, just as Starlab said, keep your options open and research inot where you want to go, how hard/easy the job is.

bossman20081
2005-Jul-22, 02:00 AM
Well, Star, a physicist and astronomer are very similar fields. In fact, a masters in physics is enough to become an astronomer. So, I was thinking of a bachelors in engineering or astronomy and a masters or PhD in physics. I haven't really narrowed it down any further than that.

Matthew
2005-Jul-24, 07:20 AM
Which university were you looking at? I wasn't aware of a bachelor of astronomy. Usually there are Bachelor of Science with a major in say astronomy or astrophysics.

bossman20081
2005-Jul-24, 09:46 PM
Sorry for the confusion, Matt; that's what I meant, a major in astronomy.

And to the people that suggested engineering, which kind of engineering?

StarLab
2005-Jul-25, 03:25 AM
Aerospace.

alfchemist
2005-Jul-25, 05:53 AM
Hello, Bossman! too early for you to think of your career. Enjoy highschool, enjoy astronomy and physics, enjoy every field. Who knows, you may end up as astrobiologist classifying alien creatures according to their phyla! :D :D :D

When you're about to enter college, let me suggest you take ** in Physics. Along the way, you'd know if you really are for it. I took ** in Chemistry, had my masters, and a dissertation-short of Ph.D., worked on pure basic science research, taught for more that 12yrs but up to now, I'm still looking for my place under the sun.

Astra
2005-Jul-30, 10:12 PM
Well I followed my heart in studying physics. Everytime I look up at the sky I feel why. Search for something that makes your heart beat faster, but research the realities. Its no use to realise your mistake after its too late. ;)

bossman20081
2005-Jul-31, 04:24 AM
Originally posted by alfchemist@Jul 25 2005, 02:23 AM
Hello, Bossman! too early for you to think of your career. Enjoy highschool, enjoy astronomy and physics, enjoy every field. Who knows, you may end up as astrobiologist classifying alien creatures according to their phyla! :D :D :D

When you're about to enter college, let me suggest you take ** in Physics. Along the way, you'd know if you really are for it. I took ** in Chemistry, had my masters, and a dissertation-short of Ph.D., worked on pure basic science research, taught for more that 12yrs but up to now, I'm still looking for my place under the sun.
It's never too early ;)