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StarLab
2005-Jul-15, 05:11 AM
At this point, post-Cosmos 1 failure, what do YOU think the next few immediate steps in spaceflight should be?

aeolus
2005-Jul-15, 06:04 AM
Commercial, Private, Government, or over all?

Finish ISS, get CEV on the roll, and really push to ACTIVELY develop materials/methods for space elevator/solar sail (Just as Cosmos-1 was trying to do)

tater1337
2005-Jul-15, 01:11 PM
Originally posted by StarLab@Jul 15 2005, 05:11 AM
At this point, post-Cosmos 1 failure, what do YOU think the next few immediate steps in spaceflight should be?
get shed big enough for 2 redstones
gain permission to use gravel lot for engine testing
finish the 1/18th scale prototype
start the 1/6 scale
get the full scale capsule prototype assembled and measured/weighed
start buying carbon fiber and e-glass on eBay
stock up on epoxy


oh wait, did you mean the general populations next steps, or just mine?
(not joking)

Spacemad
2005-Jul-17, 10:41 AM
get shed big enough for 2 redstones ???

Excuse my ignorance but what are these "redstones" you're talking about?

I was following the progress of Cosmos1 closely for the most part of the year & was full of expectation to see just how well their technology would work in the real conditions of space. I was very disappointed to see that the launch vehicle failed in its first stage & the capsule containing the Solar Sail never actually made it into orbit.

For the future exploration of our Solar System - especially beyond Jupiter - we really need solar sail technology - at least it will put paid to the controversy over the use of nuclear isotopes to power probes (though if they would have enough energy to power the payload instruments is another question entirely!)

The ISS must be finished if space exploration is ever going to have any credibility/future (it may also serve on some occasion as a rescue point, as is planned now for the shuttle missions).

A new space exploration vehicle must be given as higher a priority as possible so as to get it "off the ground" for when the shuttles are finally "retired".

More private enterprise should be encouraged so as to make space the "province" of Man, so we can at last get more than just a "toenail hold" on space - as is the present case with national space agencies taking on the burden. They have broken up the "fallow" land now it's time for commercial businesses to get in on the act & make that "land" produce "fruit" & become profitable. :)

While the Space Elevator seems to be even more of a "pipe dream" than the Solar Sail I think it may have great potential - if all the problems can be resolved (including security to guard against terrorist attacks). It seems that it should be able to lift very big payloads into Earth orbit at a fraction of the cost of using chemically powered rockets, with all the attendant dangers & pollution associated.

qraal
2005-Jul-19, 10:57 PM
Hi All

A "Redstone" is a launch vehicle for one of the earliest manned US space vehicles, the Mercury. I think our friend is talking of launching himself into space.

The USA's plans for their next steps seem to be to build re-entry vehicles capable of Mars-return re-entries so they can be used as part of a common infra-structure for the Moon and Mars. They're planning to launch such vehicles to LEO on modified Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) and to launch direct to the Moon or Mars atop a modified Shuttle-derived Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle.

Of interest to me is SpaceX's next steps - firstly to launch a few payloads atop their Falcon I's, and to finally build and launch their medium-lift Falcon V, which will use engines in common with the Falcon I. By 2010 Elon Musk is aiming for a delivery cost to LEO of just ~ $500/kg. If this can be done then Satellite Solar Power Stations become viable though not the traditional versions.

qraal

tater1337
2005-Jul-20, 11:56 AM
Originally posted by qraal@Jul 19 2005, 05:57 PM
Hi All

A "Redstone" is a launch vehicle for one of the earliest manned US space vehicles, the Mercury. I think our friend is talking of launching himself into space.

heh, yep. its somewhere here in another thread

:D

GOURDHEAD
2005-Jul-20, 12:49 PM
It seems that it [space elevator] should be able to lift very big payloads into Earth orbit at a fraction of the cost of using chemically powered rockets, with all the attendant dangers & pollution associated. Not very likely. We haven't discovered material with sufficient tensile strength.