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Jakenorrish
2005-Jul-15, 11:51 AM
News from China today is that Shenzhou VI will launch in early October and send 2 men into space who will orbit for 5 or 6 days.

What are the opinions of the forum on this news? Will China and the US be engaging in a space race similar to the Soviet situation from the 50's to the 80's, or can you see them (hopefully) co-operating further down the line?

tater1337
2005-Jul-15, 12:42 PM
Originally posted by Jakenorrish@Jul 15 2005, 11:51 AM
News from China today is that Shenzhou VI will launch in early October and send 2 men into space who will orbit for 5 or 6 days.

What are the opinions of the forum on this news? Will China and the US be engaging in a space race similar to the Soviet situation from the 50's to the 80's, or can you see them (hopefully) co-operating further down the line?
intresting how updates in technology allow other countries to accelerate their space program in comparison to ours......

we took about 7 flights before we got up to 2 seaters if I recall correctly.

china does it in two

(yes, you -know-who, I am smirking)

aeolus
2005-Jul-15, 03:07 PM
I honestly think they'll go to Mars before we do. Honestly.

Now as sad as it may be, I also do not include the term "arrive", "land", or "set foot upon" intentionally. The USSR was "ready" to go to the moon; their rockets never got off the ground, though.

China does have our experience to look at, but in the end, it is our experience. I think we upheld Kennedy's pledge because we took all neccesary planning, training, and testing into our own hands.

bossman20081
2005-Jul-15, 04:47 PM
Why has China taken such a big interest in spaceflight all of the sudden?

In any case, I see China as being a glass of water next to the ocean; they just don't compare to NASA. Our experience and technology is rivaled only by Russia. But, who know what the future holds, China may develope it's own shuttle...

aeolus
2005-Jul-15, 05:38 PM
Originally posted by bossman20081@Jul 15 2005, 04:47 PM
But, who know what the future holds, China may develope it's own shuttle...
If they're smart, they won't.

antoniseb
2005-Jul-15, 11:33 PM
Originally posted by aeolus@Jul 15 2005, 05:38 PM
If they're smart, they won't.
Perhaps they'll develop their own Crew Exploration Vehicle.

aeolus
2005-Jul-15, 11:44 PM
Originally posted by antoniseb@Jul 15 2005, 11:33 PM
Perhaps they'll develop their own Crew Exploration Vehicle.
As long as their spacecraft & program delivers, something STS can't claim for itself.

I'm not trying to put down Shuttle, it's technicians, engineers, etc. I don't mean to sound condesending or complaining-like. But something is to be learned from our "one-size-fits-all" reusable program, which isn't exactly re-used, nor does it always fit.

CEV looks a bit smarter - build as you go for each mission as opposed to build it and hope it goes for each mission.

bossman20081
2005-Jul-17, 04:13 AM
Originally posted by antoniseb+Jul 15 2005, 08:03 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (antoniseb @ Jul 15 2005, 08:03 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-aeolus@Jul 15 2005, 05:38 PM
If they&#39;re smart, they won&#39;t.
Perhaps they&#39;ll develop their own Crew Exploration Vehicle. [/b][/quote]
Don&#39;t take everything I say so literally; I merely meant that they could possibly create a spacecraft as, if not more, capable the shuttle.

rambo07
2005-Jul-17, 09:25 AM
The more people getting into space the better , the one thing about NASA is that it is still very limited to what it can do , I wish China (Japan ,India) All the best ,its a pity Europe isn&#39;t doing something like this, for all the hype about the Euro Zone etc

Spacemad
2005-Jul-17, 09:45 AM
Originally posted by rambo07@Jul 17 2005, 09:25 AM
The more people getting into space the better , the one thing about NASA is that it is still very limited to what it can do , I wish China (Japan ,India) All the best ,its a pity Europe isn&#39;t doing something like this, for all the hype about the Euro Zone etc

I find myself in agreement on both counts, rambo07, "the more people getting into space the better" & your desire to see the Asian nations making their mark on space.

I also feel disappointed with Europe&#39;s place in this area of space exploration :( I had hoped for a greater participation in the "Space Race"&#33; We have developed the very successful Ariane series of rockets that have had very few failures - I just wish they would get together & build a version capable of taking Man to the Moon & beyond.

I&#39;m pleased, nonetheless, for China&#39;s 2nd manned space flight - this time with 2 "Taikonauts" aboard :) While not being able to rival NASA&#39;s experience, it&#39;s good to see that they are making good progress. Perhaps, in a not too distant future, we will see them cooperating with NASA & President Bush&#39;s vision for a return to the Moon & then on to Mars. :)

ChromeStar
2005-Jul-17, 07:16 PM
I hope that South Africa gets its Space Agency set up next year like they are hoping, maybe then we too can get physicaly involved in space exploration.

Here&#39;s the South African Space Portal (http://www.space.gov.za/index.php) website address for those who are intrested.

Cheers

Jakenorrish
2005-Jul-18, 11:01 AM
I honestly think they&#39;ll go to Mars before we do. Honestly.

Hi Aeolus,

Interesting. Why&#39;s that?

aeolus
2005-Jul-18, 12:10 PM
China is on the rise, and there&#39;d be no better way to prove to the world that they&#39;re a player than to try and take the cake by planting their flag first. They&#39;ve got the manpower and resources at their disposal to do it. Now, we do to, if WE WANTED to, but therin lies my main point: We have what it takes, it&#39;s a matter of whether WE (as a nation) WANT to do it. Criticize the political proces as you wish, but you have to admit that in whatever kind of democracy, if the people want tax breaks, education, social services, etc instead of space missions, it&#39;s a pretty sure thing space missions won&#39;t get the priority. China doesn&#39;t work in exactly the same way. The billion and a half that live there don&#39;t have as much of a say as we do, and if a few people at the top want a mission to mars to look big and buff to the world, theyll get it, whether the PEOPLE WANT it or health care.

As much as we benefited from the space race, I for one beleive there was a bit of a "lets see who&#39;s the strongest kid on the playground" mentality between the USA and USSR that drove it to a certain extent. Its all good, but I think we&#39;re past that. Others, with a plethora of expoitable resources and manpower, may not see it like that.

cosmosnut
2005-Jul-18, 07:59 PM
You can bet your bottom dollar that china has plans to take advantage of our current ho-hum attitude toward space. They will surpass us a lot sooner than anyone thinks. They have gone from a third world economy to a financial giant in a remarkably short period of time. Sure they don&#39;t play by the rules, they never agreed to. We will probably need to speak chinese if we want to visit the moon after they set up their base.

RUF
2005-Jul-19, 04:21 AM
I think I saw a news report that stated that there was going to be three or four people in the next Chinese Flight. I may have misunderstood, or they might have been mis-reporting the facts.

Hey, Aelous, why not put down the shuttle? maybe if enough people did, we could scrap that colossal waste of money in favour of something better (and less expensive). Remember, &#036;1.4 billion was spent for this "return to flight". Was it worth it for a Shuttle that&#39;s only supposed to fly another 4 1/2 years?

Jakenorrish
2005-Jul-19, 08:21 AM
The American members of the board seem very cynical as to China&#39;s motives. I for one think that you should be a little more hopeful that the Chinese are pushing the envelope of science, exploration, and nothing sinister is afoot. After all the US/Soviet space race was ultimately beneficial for everyone.

Surely anything the Chinese bring to the party is a bonus.

aeolus
2005-Jul-19, 11:26 AM
Originally posted by Jakenorrish@Jul 19 2005, 08:21 AM
The American members of the board seem very cynical as to China&#39;s motives. I for one think that you should be a little more hopeful that the Chinese are pushing the envelope of science, exploration, and nothing sinister is afoot. After all the US/Soviet space race was ultimately beneficial for everyone.

Surely anything the Chinese bring to the party is a bonus.
Yep, it was beneficial to everyone, as I said in my post.

It seems you also agree with my view that the space race wasn&#39;t only about developing science and benefiting the world- if not, why attach the qualifier "ultimately"? China may be pushing the envelope of science and exploration, but I think there are always other motives driving things, to a certain extent. And Sinister? - No. Human (the drive to be the best)? - Yes.



I think I saw a news report that stated that there was going to be three or four people in the next Chinese Flight. I may have misunderstood, or they might have been mis-reporting the facts.

Hey, Aelous, why not put down the shuttle? maybe if enough people did, we could scrap that colossal waste of money in favour of something better (and less expensive). Remember, &#036;1.4 billion was spent for this "return to flight". Was it worth it for a Shuttle that&#39;s only supposed to fly another 4 1/2 years?


You might have read the capsule could carry 3-4 taikonauts, that&#39;s my guess. For sure the plans are to launch with 2 this fall.

You&#39;ll see through my posts I&#39;m not a fan of the Shuttle either. But people want space science to happen, and without an alternative vehicle, we&#39;d have nothing. People wouldn&#39;t like a 10-15 year gap in US human spaceflight. And on the non-scientific side of things, what would it look like if after Columbia, we said "you know what guys, its time to move onto the next generation of spacecraft." Scientists and engineers would understand this at face value. But I don&#39;t think the average American on the street would understand why after 2 accidents NASA was throwing in the towel on the most advanced piece of machinery ever created.

Jakenorrish
2005-Jul-20, 07:43 AM
Hear hear&#33;