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Fraser
2005-Jul-26, 06:10 PM
SUMMARY: Cassini has obtained fascinating new images of the surface of Saturn's moon Enceladus. The spacecraft made its closest flyby so far on July 14, when it passed only 175 km (109 miles) within the moon's southern pole. This region is strangely free of impact craters, but it is littered with house-sized ice boulders. Enceladus has the most reflective surface in the solar system; it's as pure and white as freshly fallen snow. These gigantic blocks of ice were a complete surprise to scientists and they'll take some time to figure out what could have caused them.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/cassini_finds_unusual_geology_on_enceladus.html)

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

upriver
2005-Jul-27, 12:35 AM
"The area is also littered with house-sized ice boulders carved by unique tectonic patterns found only in this region of the moon."

What??????????????????????????????????????

Jerry
2005-Jul-27, 04:15 AM
Boulders of ice, or Ice coated boulders?

I can't explain this - well, the boulders, yes, rocks happen. We are seeing all kinds of evidence that the moons of Saturn require materials with greater density than water. Get used to that: Newtonian physics are not working.

But the tiger stripes and other flow patterns are difficult to impossible to explain...did Enceladus pass through Saturn's rings, clearing a slot while picking up a temporarily unfrozen coat?

Eric Vaxxine
2005-Jul-27, 12:46 PM
The moons of Saturn are VERY odd aren't they?
Iapetus looks like it was moulded in two halves, Dione isn't round, Titan is a chemical wonderworld. Encleadus is as white as driven snow.
And big Daddy Saturn itself is the most outstanding landmark.

Saturn's spin is slowing. It emits eerie signals. Wow. This is a great place to do scientific research.

How long before we can get a human flyby of this neighbourhood? I'll go.

Eric Vaxxine
2005-Jul-27, 12:52 PM
Actually, can anyone else see that ... Iapetus looks...well....er....not round? check this image ...the horizon just looks...hmmm.... angular ?
I have got my glasses on, does anyone have a theory/answer/reason?

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/imag...7/N00026329.jpg (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/casJPGFullS07/N00026329.jpg)


http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/imag...7/N00026262.jpg (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/casJPGFullS07/N00026262.jpg)

antoniseb
2005-Jul-27, 01:33 PM
Originally posted by Eric Vaxxine@Jul 27 2005, 12:52 PM
Iapetus looks...well....er....not round?
Iapetus is special. I think that when we understand how it got the way it is, we will understand some important aspects of the early days of our Solar System. It is possible that the seeming angular boundary in the image you pointed us to is an artifact of image processing, but that is just a guess.

Nereid
2005-Jul-27, 11:19 PM
Originally posted by Eric Vaxxine@Jul 27 2005, 12:52 PM
Actually, can anyone else see that ... Iapetus looks...well....er....not round? check this image ...the horizon just looks...hmmm.... angular ?
I have got my glasses on, does anyone have a theory/answer/reason?

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/imag...7/N00026329.jpg (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/casJPGFullS07/N00026329.jpg)


http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/imag...7/N00026262.jpg (http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/raw/casJPGFullS07/N00026262.jpg)
Did you try doing some analyses, based on the (digital) data in the image, plus the camera position, Iapetus position, camera geometrics, ....?