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Fraser
2005-Aug-04, 06:29 PM
SUMMARY: The Hubble Space Telescope spent 40 hours gazing at the same spot in the sky to produce a photograph filled with galaxies. The field shown in this image is a fraction of the size of the full moon in the sky, but it shows a rich diversity of galaxies. Some are big; some small; a few close; and most far away. The photograph was actually a bonus, taken in September 2003 while Hubble was using its other instruments for research in the same area.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/hubble_spies_zoo_galaxies.html)

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

aeolus
2005-Aug-04, 06:56 PM
The spiral galaxy at about the 5 o'clock position from the star at the focus of the picture looks like something right out of a sci-fi movie. It's so perfect, so detailed, just floating there. But it's real. That is absolutely incredible. I love space. :)

g bomb
2005-Aug-05, 07:45 AM
in every inch of sky you see at night there are thousands, probably millions of galaxies.. billions upon billions of them all throughout the univerese..

how can anyone say we are the only speck of dust in this vast arena which is lucky enough to harbor life? even if we never discover life in our own galaxy aside from earth, there are so many opportunities out there for life to arise that it impossible to deny.. ill bet some galaxies are ripe with life, overflowing with it even.. the scenes depicted in "star wars" could very likely be true in some far flung galaxy.. comforting actually..

edited by Nereid: religious reference deleted life is precious where ever it exists, for it is, i feel, the purpose of this great and impressive array of wonders we see above us.. my theory is that each and every star at some point in its lifespan can and often will harbor life on the worlds that orbit it.. as the mass of each star expands and heats outter regions, new life arises and thives until it is wiped away.. and so it goes.. all the answeres to all the questions lie within our minds.. we just dont realize it yet

Eric Vaxxine
2005-Aug-05, 08:02 AM
It's like being at the zoo looking at that image.

dave_f
2005-Aug-05, 08:20 AM
Distant galaxies tend to be redder visibly as well (the really distant ones are very noticeably so).

Is it my imagination or are the near stars somewhat distorted (the big bright red blob in the center looks "off-center somehow)? Is that the pixel-bleeding effect?

Eric Vaxxine
2005-Aug-05, 09:37 AM
If Hubble did 40 hours exposures for the entire field of view, would every part of the universe be this busy? Or is this a partricularly generous portion of the universe?

Jakenorrish
2005-Aug-05, 11:56 AM
It seems that whenever Hubble is utilised in this way, the Universe as a whole is as generous as this with its galaxies.

cran
2005-Aug-05, 12:29 PM
Originally posted by Jakenorrish@Aug 5 2005, 07:56 PM
It seems that whenever Hubble is utilised in this way, the Universe as a whole is as generous as this with its galaxies.
Indeed. And may Hubble continue to be utilised in this way for a long, long time.

aeolus
2005-Aug-05, 01:11 PM
Originally posted by cran@Aug 5 2005, 12:29 PM
And may Hubble continue to be utilised in this way for a long, long time.
long, long time? Not really...a few more years, then a servicing mission, then a few more after that.

cran
2005-Aug-06, 12:53 AM
You&#39;re probably right, aeolus; it was just a >sigh< wish on my part - but hey&#33; even a servicing mission was looking doubtful for a while.

I&#39;ve never been a great fan of the &#39;throw-away consumer&#39; society - if important contributions to astronomy can still be made with backyard telescopes, just imagine what Hubble might yet find even after the next generation of technology goes online...

The more instruments we can bring to bear on the universe, the more students/scientists can access time, the more we must eventually discover&#33;

Therefore, I wish Hubble the longest life possible - even if it is eventually held together with blu-tac and obsolete fuse wire&#33;

:P

Jakenorrish
2005-Aug-08, 10:39 AM
Therefore, I wish Hubble the longest life possible - even if it is eventually held together with blu-tac and obsolete fuse wire&#33;

Absolutely. Just think what we&#39;ve been able to learn over the last 15 years or so with this most wonderful of telescopes. We must keep it running. I know its expensive, but lets hope they can get the shuttle tank sorted out quickly so they can repair Hubble. After all imagine how primitive our knowledge would still be without it....

Ola D.
2005-Aug-10, 10:26 AM
Originally posted by Eric Vaxxine@Aug 5 2005, 09:37 AM
If Hubble did 40 hours exposures for the entire field of view, would every part of the universe be this busy? Or is this a partricularly generous portion of the universe?
Keith Noll from Hubble Heritage Team, Space Telescope Science Institute provided this answer regarding Eric&#39;s question:


Every part of the universe would look this busy if we could look with
Hubble for this long AND if there is not something in the way (like our galaxy) to
block the view.

Don&#39;t hesitate to ask any further questions&#33; ;-)

cran
2005-Aug-10, 11:18 AM
All the more reason, then, to keep ol&#39; Hubble keepin&#39; on&#33;

Thanks again, Ola D., and to Keith&#33; :D


Don&#39;t hesitate to ask any further questions&#33; ;-) No worries about that... :D