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Planetwatcher
2003-Sep-02, 03:59 AM
How about a nice little survay of your favoritte planet, moon, asteroid, comet, Kupier object, or even all the above.
Let's hear what your favoritte object is, why it is, and perhaps a few facts about it.

My favoritte planet is Uranus, at a distance of 1.78 billion miles, or 2.87 billion kilometers. It takes sunlight 2 hours and 42 minutes (give or take a few) to reach this distant sentenal.
It appears green in color because of methane gas in the upper atmosphere which absorbs red light. It has rings much like Saturn except they are much darker.
A Uraniun day is 17 hours, and 14 minutes. It takes 84 years to circle the Sun once.
The most unique thing about Uranus is that it's axles is a 60 degree angle which places it almost on it's side.
That, it's remoteness, it's rings, and it's larger moons is why I like it best.

Uranus has 24 (last I knew) known moons. It's largest, Titania is one of my favorite moons.
Titania is 1578 Km. in diameter, which makes it the 17th largest object in the Solar System. Pluto is the next larger, and Saturns 2nd largest moon Rhea is the next smaller.

My other favorite moon is Neptune's moon Proteus. Discovered by Voyager 2 in 1989. It displaced Neried as the 2nd largest. Even though larger, it is as dark as soot, and much closer to the planet then Neried and Triton, so it is often lost in Neptune's glare. It is 500 miles in diameter, and orbits Neptune in a little under 27 hours. It is my other favorite because I've always had a soft spot for the underdog, which Proteus is, having had another moon take it's position for 40 years.

My favoritte asteroid is called Chiron. It orbits the Sun in a highly eliptical orbit, between Saturn and Uranus, coming close to the orbits of both.

I find Quanor the most intriging of Kupier objects. Only Pluto is larger in the Kupier belt.

I missed both Halley and Hale/Bopp comets. The only one I've seen is Kohootek (Proabley spelled wrong) discovered around 1973.

Think I'll save some of the facts for other fans of the space bodies I favor the most.

snowflakeuniverse
2003-Sep-02, 06:12 PM
I like this topic but I would be hard pressed to pick a favorite astronomical object. Many times it is the memories or associations that one has that makes something a favorite. Since the moon has played a role in my life beyond just astronomy, I guess the moon would have to qualify as my first choice. This is odd in that the sun is far more important but I just don’t initially think of the sun as a star.

The moon has been one of my favorite celestial objects to observe. Years ago when I was much younger, I remember staying up all night watching the moon with my 8-inch telescope. The moon was at a quarter phase and I watched the shadows near the terminal moraine slowly increase during the night. I think it was the first time I ever imagined what it would be like to be in another place. With a rotational rate that is about 28 days, sunsets are 28 times longer. So I sat at night, by myself, and imagined watching the crisp shadows slowly extend across a white gray expanse filled with pockmarks and dusty chucks of rocks.

snowflake

DippyHippy
2003-Sep-03, 04:48 AM
Oh lordy LOL

I adore observing Jupiter and Saturn... and until this year I hadn't really seen Mars at all because for whatever reason, it just hasn't been practical. But if I could get views of Mars as I have this year, I'd be quite fascinated to watch the little red world whenever I could.

In terms of moons, I'd have to say the moons of Saturn fascinate me. I know Jupiter has the Galilean satellites, but there are only four of those and the rest are pretty tiny in comparison. Saturn has a nice collection of decent sized moons, all visible in small scopes... that, plus Saturn's beautiful rings and the faint hint of patterns in the cloudtops, gives Saturn the edge for me :D

kashi
2003-Sep-03, 05:11 AM
I dunno about you guys, but I really dig Earth.

snowflakeuniverse
2003-Sep-03, 09:58 PM
Ok
Well I really dig the Universe

snowflake

imported_Draco
2003-Sep-04, 10:27 AM
Saturn was my favourite planet when I was in primary (I'm in high school) Mainly because of its magnificent rings! I also liked Neptune! The name of the planet intrigued me :)
Right now Europa is my favourite moon :)

Planetwatcher
2003-Sep-05, 12:33 AM
Okay, so far we have
1 for Earth
1 for the Moon,
1 sort of for Jupiter, :unsure:
2 for Saturn, :D
1 for Saturns moons, :P
1 for Uranus (me), ;)
1 for Uranuses moon Titania (also me),
1 sort of for Neptune, B) and
1 for Neptune's moon Proteus (me again) :blink:
And one for the whole universe,

That's a pretty decent collection so far. And we haven't even heard from Phillip
Slatter, Rocketa, or Frasier yet. :lol:
Last time I did a survay like this, Saturn was the overwhelming trump over the all the others.

I too am intrigued by Saturn's moons like Dippy said.

But what impressed me was this. Even though Jupiter has way more total moons then any of the others, Saturn has at least one, and mostly several in each size range. :o

That became very interesting when I was making a (somewhat scale in size) model of the solar system mobile that hung above my station where I work.

My Sun was a painted beach ball, Jupiter was a 3 inch styrofoam ball, Saturn a 2 1/2 inch styrofoam ball with a cut out and painted butter dish lid as the rings.
Neptune and Uranus were a pair of 1 inch styofoam balls. Earth, Venus and Mars were small cotton pom poms. And I used stick pins to represent moons. They had different color and different size heads, from big corsage pins for Ganymede, Titan, and Mercury, down to plain stick pins with the heads painted white, black or brown for Himilaia (of Jupiter), Phoebe (of Saturn), Puck (of Uranus)and Galitia (of Neptune) In the end, I had 45 bodies represented including a few asteroids I threw in. My boss pronoucend me as obsessed, but everyone had to check out my mobel model. <_< <_< <_< B) ;) :o :huh: :blink: :ph34r: :unsure: :)

Any way those moons are pretty neat.

rodonnell
2003-Sep-05, 02:42 AM
As a part time astronomy educator, this is an easy one to answer.

I use my "Oh Wow" meter, I record the number of "Oh Wow"s" I get per object.

The moon through my telescope gets a number of "Oh Wows", closely followed by Omega Centuri (Southern Sky).

The ALL TIME GREATEST OH WOW Object is: Saturn &#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;

I often get asked have I glued a picture to the end of the telescope, it is a great object to finish a nights viewing on.

Regards


Rod

rodonnell
2003-Sep-05, 02:44 AM
As a part time astronomy educator, this is an easy one to answer.

I use my "Oh Wow" meter, I record the number of "Oh Wow"s" I get per object.

The moon through my telescope gets a number of "Oh Wows", closely followed by Omega Centuri (Southern Sky).

The ALL TIME GREATEST OH WOW Object is: Saturn &#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;

I often get asked have I glued a picture to the end of the telescope, it is a great object to finish a nights viewing on.

Regards


Rod

kashi
2003-Sep-05, 09:32 AM
The Universe is not a favourite planet or moon now is it?

Starry7
2003-Sep-05, 04:33 PM
This is a tough question, because there are a lot of wonderful objects in the sky. When it comes to planets, Saturn is quite spectacular, particularly when it&#39;s rings are tilted open toward us. But my favourite object has to be Comet Halle Bopp, because that is what got me interested in astronomy.
The fact that you could see something that comes from the outer solar system in that much detail (it had a nice blue ion tail and a regular gas tail) amazed me and made me think of what else I could see in the sky with modest equipment ( all I have are a pair of not so great binos, and I really want a nice telescope, but as a student, money must go elsewhere).
So anyway, that&#39;s my vote.

snowflakeuniverse
2003-Sep-06, 01:47 AM
Doesn’t the Universe contain all the planets and all the moons? I dig them all. I just threw in all the stars, dust and black holes into the mix for fun.

OK Im sorry, I am being an idiot. It is just that I thought that the question was kind of interesting, and that some would not only write what they liked, but why. I to remember going “wow” when I saw the rings of Saturn. The great extension of perception the telescope provided is an amazing experience.

Forgive me Kashi?

snowflake

KB3HTS
2003-Sep-06, 01:59 AM
Because of hometown bias and all, I&#39;d have to vote for Earth. B)
Other then that, I&#39;d have to vote for Mars. This is mainly because I&#39;m doing a little research project on it (or at least so I claim) and it kinda grows on you. Where else do you get such a huge canyon, such a huge volcano, and so many other things that seem to be like Earth yet slightly different? I also like thinking that someday I can go there; I wouldn&#39;t care about the three year round trip. A faraway day to be sure, but I&#39;ll be patient. :D

RUF
2003-Sep-06, 07:59 PM
The Moon.

I look up and see it every night, and take it for granted.
When I look at it thru a telescope, I realize how beautiful, how detailed, and how bright it is, and I realize how much people just glance at it and don&#39;t know what they are missing.

Half-moons are the best, when the terminus between light and dark outlines all the craters and mountains. WOW.

Karen M.
2003-Sep-07, 02:36 AM
I have several favorties:

Saturn - wow, those rings are so awesome (and I own one too).

Andromeda Galaxy - it&#39;s so far away, but so like our own home galaxy. I first saw it thru a scope at Palomar Observatory (one of the minor scopes), it was a sight I will never forget.

Io - those volcanoes are great.

The Veil Nebula - so whispy, so pretty.

Orion - I see it and I know cooler days are coming soon, a welcome to Fall.


Just my 2 cents worth.

Karen M.

Planetwatcher
2003-Sep-07, 03:53 AM
So now we have

1 more for Earth, making 2; :)
2 more for the Moon, making 3; B)
1 for Mars; :P
1 for Comet Hale/Bopp; (was wondering when that was coming) <_<
1 for Omega Centuri; (Is that anywhere close to Alpha Centauri?) :huh:
4 more for Saturn making 6; (knew that was going to happen) ;)
1 for Jupiter&#39;s moon Io; :rolleyes:
1 for the Orion and Veil Nebulas; :o
1 for the Andromeda Galaxy
The rest remain unchanged.


1 for Jupiter;
1 for Saturns moons,
1 for Uranus (me),
1 for Uranuses moon Titania (also me),
1 sort of for Neptune, and
1 for Neptune&#39;s moon Proteus (me again)

I had thought to do a serperate survay for stars and such. But if we are going to include them, I would say Epsilon Eridani, Lalande, and Sirius, followed by Procyon for me. Yes I have a few favorite stars. :D

KB3HTS
2003-Sep-07, 04:58 PM
Oh, we&#39;re doing things outside of the solar system as well? Very well then, my favorite deep sky object is the Ring Nebula, my favorite star is Vega, and my favorite constellation is Lyra. :D The great majority of my stargazing happens in the summer, so somewhere along the way this is what happened.

zephyr46
2003-Sep-09, 02:11 AM
Originally posted by Planetwatcher@Sep 2 2003, 03:59 AM
How about a nice little survay of your favoritte planet, moon, asteroid, comet, Kupier object, or even all the above.
Let&#39;s hear what your favoritte object is, why it is, and perhaps a few facts about it.

My favoritte planet is Uranus, at a distance of 1.78 billion miles, or 2.87 billion kilometers. It takes sunlight 2 hours and 42 minutes (give or take a few) to reach this distant sentenal.
It appears green in color because of methane gas in the upper atmosphere which absorbs red light. It has rings much like Saturn except they are much darker.
A Uraniun day is 17 hours, and 14 minutes. It takes 84 years to circle the Sun once.
The most unique thing about Uranus is that it&#39;s axles is a 60 degree angle which places it almost on it&#39;s side.
That, it&#39;s remoteness, it&#39;s rings, and it&#39;s larger moons is why I like it best.

Uranus has 24 (last I knew) known moons. It&#39;s largest, Titania is one of my favorite moons.
Titania is 1578 Km. in diameter, which makes it the 17th largest object in the Solar System. Pluto is the next larger, and Saturns 2nd largest moon Rhea is the next smaller.

My other favorite moon is Neptune&#39;s moon Proteus. Discovered by Voyager 2 in 1989. It displaced Neried as the 2nd largest. Even though larger, it is as dark as soot, and much closer to the planet then Neried and Triton, so it is often lost in Neptune&#39;s glare. It is 500 miles in diameter, and orbits Neptune in a little under 27 hours. It is my other favorite because I&#39;ve always had a soft spot for the underdog, which Proteus is, having had another moon take it&#39;s position for 40 years.

My favoritte asteroid is called Chiron. It orbits the Sun in a highly eliptical orbit, between Saturn and Uranus, coming close to the orbits of both.

I find Quanor the most intriging of Kupier objects. Only Pluto is larger in the Kupier belt.

I missed both Halley and Hale/Bopp comets. The only one I&#39;ve seen is Kohootek (Proabley spelled wrong) discovered around 1973.

Think I&#39;ll save some of the facts for other fans of the space bodies I favor the most.
Io with out a doubt &#33; though I also have a fondness for our recently discovered co orbital companions 3753 Cruithne and 2002 AA29, and as far as mars is concerned 37655 Illapa old enough to have a name and recently dropped by 0.027 AU, but outside of the solar system I would have to say the distence between Sol and Proxima centauri ? Does that count ? if it doesn&#39;t the galactic center, my obsession :)

Dave Mitsky
2003-Sep-10, 08:50 AM
Originally posted by Planetwatcher@Sep 2 2003, 03:59 AM
How about a nice little survay of your favoritte planet, moon, asteroid, comet, Kupier object, or even all the above.
Let&#39;s hear what your favoritte object is, why it is, and perhaps a few facts about it.


Jupiter, IMO, is the most interesting planet to observe for a variety of reasons. However, during its 2003 apparition Mars, the only planet that has surface features that are easily discernible through amateur instruments, has provided some fascinating views.

My favorite moon is the Moon, the only extraterrestrial body that human beings have visited. Observing the Moon is always rewarding since phase changes and libration bring about a terrain that constantly changes in appearance.

The minor planet that I&#39;ll remember the longest was asteroid 2002 NY40. This NEO moved with tremendous speed and was the fastest naturally occurring celestial object (other than a meteor) that I&#39;ve ever observed.

Comet C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake), when it was nearest the Earth and after the Moon set, was the most spectacular comet that I&#39;ve ever seen. The record-setting performance of Comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) was impressive (I was able to observe it from August 1995 to February 1998) but Comet Hyakutake&#39;s tremendously long and ghostly tail, as ephemeral as it was, impressed me even more.

Dave Mitsky

CyberJIT
2003-Sep-11, 02:37 AM
It has helped me a lot to wait for a few posts before writing mine. I wouldn&#39;t have thought of many of those.

1) Earth: it isn&#39;t obvious until you think about it. Yes it&#39;s a celestial body, only not from our point of view. It becomes clear when you see those full earth pics.

2) Sun: ¿have you seen ""The Sun&#39;s Surface in 3D (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap030624.html)"? ¿And those solar flares? And now i read that it produces more antimatter that we could have ever imagined. Just when I thought it was *just* a massive nuclear fusion reactor ;).

3) THE Moon: the first object I watched with my tiny telescope. It looks like a big ball of concrete. Watching it&#39;s surface in detail gives you one of those existencial moments. Full eclipses are great, and just "by coincidence" we live in an era when the moon is exactly at the distance where it appears to be the same size as the sun. Being the only object in space (besides earth :D) that humans have walked on gives it some big extra points.

4) Saturn: agreed on the "wow effect". After the moon, i used some interactive planetarium software to see what i could point at, and it came as the first obvious choice. In my little telescope it looks nothing like those proffesional or even the amateur pictures, but I could actually see the rings&#33; Amazing.

5) The rest of our solar system&#39;s moons: i&#39;ve seen a documentary (¿have you seen it? the one with john lithgow&#39;s voice) where it says that life has higher odds of being found in one of those moons than in the of our solar system&#39;s planets. And their features are like those of sci-fi worlds.

6) The other trillion of objects out there (from galaxy clusters to space dust): I didn&#39;t want to leave anything out :lol:

imported_ROB
2003-Sep-11, 11:22 AM
I THINK THE GREATEST PLANET HAS TO BE SATURN BUT CANT WAIT TO SEE WHAT PLANETS LAY OUT SIDE OUR SOLAR SYSTEM
EUROPA IS MY FAVORITE MOON SO MUCH PROMISE OF LIFE :o

Faulkner
2003-Sep-11, 12:21 PM
If we&#39;re including stars, I&#39;d like to nominate Alpha Centauri A...it&#39;s our next-door neighbour & virtually identical to our Sun...which begs the question: Has it evolved a planetary system like our Sun & possibly even Earth-like planet(s)?? Does anybody know of any Hubble investigation of this star? Why aren&#39;t we looking for planets around this star? I can&#39;t find anything on the &#39;net&#33; We find planets around stars 50-500 light years away&#33; Wouldn&#39;t it be logical to examine our close neighbour (4.3 ly distant), especially because it is so similar to our sun (G2 type star)? Also if I was in charge of SETI, I would be targeting good ol&#39; Alpha Centauri&#33;&#33; Strange, I can&#39;t find much on the internet at all about our next-door neighbour&#33;?

Dave Mitsky
2003-Sep-12, 11:36 AM
Regarding possible planets in the Alpha Centauri system see these sites:

http://www.solstation.com/stars/alp-cent3.htm

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/alph...uri_030317.html (http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/alpha_centauri_030317.html)

http://homepage.sunrise.ch/homepage/schatz...a-Centauri.html (http://homepage.sunrise.ch/homepage/schatzer/Alpha-Centauri.html)

http://www.aas.org/publications/baas/v33n3...dps2001/541.htm (http://www.aas.org/publications/baas/v33n3/dps2001/541.htm)


Dave Mitsky

Faulkner
2003-Sep-14, 01:23 AM
Cheers for the great links&#33; According to these, Hubble looked at the Alpha Centauri star system around March &#39;02. Where/when can we find the results?

Planetwatcher
2003-Sep-14, 11:36 PM
My what great responses. Here are the totals as of this posting.

Of the planets

9 for Saturn,
4 for Mars,
3 for Earth,
2 for Jupiter,
1 for Uranus,
1 for Neptune,
and 0 for Venus, Mercury, and Pluto (so far)

Of the moons

7 for Earths moon,
2 for Io of Jupiter,
2 for Europa of Jupiter,
1 for all of Saturn&#39;s moons,
1 for Titania of Uranus,
1 for Proteas of Neptune,
1 for 3753 Cruithne (Earth&#39;s other moon),
1 for 2002 AA29 (Earth&#39;s other moon&#39;s moon)

Of asteroids, comets, and Kupier objects

2 for Comet Hale/Bopp,
1 for Comet Hyakutake,
1 for Comet Kohutek,
1 for Kupier object 2002 Ny401,
1 for IIIapa,
1 for Quanor,
1 for Chiron,

Of stars

3 for Alpha Centauri,
1 for our Sun Sol,
1 for Omega Centauri,
1 for Vega,
1 for Sirius,
1 for Procyon,
1 for Lalande,
1 for Epsilon Eri.

Of Constalations, Nebula, and others;

1 for Lyra,
1 for Orion,
1 for Andromeda,
1 for Veil Nebula,
1 for Ring Nebula,
1 for the Galictic Center (Isn&#39;t that just a big black hole?)
and 1 for the distance from our Solar System to Alpha Centauri.

Wow, what a list&#33;

Dave Mitsky
2003-Sep-15, 07:56 AM
Planetwatcher,

Omega Centauri, despite its designation, is not a single star. It is in actually the largest and brightest known globular cluster in the Milky Way (see http://www.seds.org/messier/xtra/ngc/n5139.html ). The second brightest, 47 Tucanae (NGC 104), was also given a stellar name. Two of my most unforgettable sights through an eyepiece were observing NGC 5139 through the Yard Scope, a 36" Tectron Dob, at the 1995 Winter Star Party (at sea level in the Florida Keys) and through a 22" Starmaster Dob at the 2002 Southern Skies Star Party (at an altitude of almost 13,000 feet in Bolivia). 47 Tuc was pretty spectacular through the Starmaster as well.

Since deep-sky objects have been added to the discussion here are my favorites (with a bias towards observational rather than armchair astronomy):

Star - the carbon star S Cephei (based on color - a very deep red)
Binary star - Gamma Andromedae
Trinary star - Beta Monocerotis
Open cluster - NGC 3532
Globular cluster - NGC 5139
Emission nebula - the Eta Carinae Nebula (NGC 3372)
Planetary nebula - the Ring Nebula (M57)
Galaxy - the Large Magellanic Cloud
Naked-eye galaxy - the Milky Way

Dave Mitsky

kashi
2003-Sep-15, 11:44 AM
3753 Cruithne isn&#39;t technically a satellite of Earth. Check out:

http://www.astro.queensu.ca/~wiegert/3753/3753.html

imported_Neil Armstrong
2003-Sep-22, 09:09 AM
My favourite planet is Saturn. It certainly has a lot of &#39;wow factor&#39;. Everyone who looks at it says it&#39;s beautiful. The good thing about it is even through the smallest of telescopes Saturn&#39;s rings are clearly visible. Through my 4.5" Newtonian the image is very good. :D 1 more for Saturn

VanderL
2003-Sep-22, 02:05 PM
Favourite planet: Saturn. Not just great to watch with it&#39;s spectacular rings but I think our Earth,as well as Mars and Venus, were once moons of Saturn (father or mother planet?).
My favourite object without question is the Sun (all hail), I can&#39;t get enough watching the movie clips of the Sun in different wavelengths, and the recent close-up of a sunspot is on my desktop ever since.

saturn sweetheart
2003-Sep-26, 06:57 PM
my favoriate planent is saturn because the fact that if there was a bath tub big enough saturn could float in it and it is that fact that I find so intresting and as for moons I would say eaither Europa because the idea of life under the sea there or the moon Titan it would solve our feul problems :D

Evil Steve
2003-Sep-26, 11:04 PM
Well I realy must put a vote in for Jupiter, highly under rated often in favour of saturn. So big so colourful.

My very favorite though is Halleys comet, I remember watching an indistint blob through an old pair of Binos during 85-86 pass (of course) at about seven years old and learning it had been visiting every 75 years (or so) for most of humanitys recorded history. Not a good show but exciting none the less.

Evil

aedoni
2003-Sep-30, 10:55 PM
My favorite celestial body?

Well it has to be my namesake, Despina, a moon of Neptune.

Growing up in the US with such a odd name was quite a hardship. You can only imagine how thrilled I was to find that my name was used for a moon. I believe that Despina is listed as Neptune&#39;s 5th moon, but beyond that I don&#39;t know any other information off the top of my head.

Anyone else out there share a name with a celestial body?

imported_astro
2003-Sep-30, 11:41 PM
Hey everyone
My favorite planet is Jupiter
I love to watch it and watch as it&#39;s moons cross it&#39;s planet casting a shadow
on the surface. It&#39;s such a wonderful site to see in a telescope.
I get excited cause it&#39;s what I imagine our moon&#39;s shadow would look like on our planet if seen from outer space.

Saturn looks great in a telescope also, but Jupiter is the one for me.

Haold

Planetwatcher
2003-Oct-01, 10:59 PM
To aedoni, I&#39;ll try to find some more info about the moon youre named after and either E-mail it to you, or post it on questions and anwsers.

To everyone else,
Hello all. I haven&#39;t updated this in quite a while, and it&#39;s looking bigger all the time.
Thanks for all the great responses. These are the totals as of 5 PM Oct. 1st B)

Of the planets :)
14 for Saturn,
4 for Mars,
3 for Earth,
8 for Jupiter,
1 for Uranus,
1 for Neptune,
and 0 for Venus, Mercury, and Pluto (so far)

Of the moons :D
7 for Earths moon,
2 for Io of Jupiter,
3 for Europa of Jupiter,
1 for all of Saturn&#39;s moons,
2 for Titan, Saturn&#39;s largest moon
1 for Titania of Uranus,
1 for Proteaus of Neptune,
1 for Despina of Neptune, (and a very pretty name too.)
1 for 3753 Cruithne (Earth&#39;s other moon),
1 for 2002 AA29 (Earth&#39;s other moon&#39;s moon)
{I know Cruithne and AA29 are really not moons in their own right, because moons orbit a planet, asteroid, or Kupier object, whereas these two are really asteroids sharing Earth&#39;s orbit of the Sun, but not orbiting Earth like the Moon}

Of asteroids, comets, and Kupier objects :rolleyes:
2 for Comet Hale/Bopp,
2 for Halley&#39;s Comet
1 for Comet Hyakutake,
1 for Comet Kohutek,
1 for Kupier object 2002 Ny401,
1 for IIIapa,
1 for Quanor,
1 for Chiron,

Of stars B)
3 for Alpha Centauri,
1 for our Sun Sol,
1 for Omega Centauri,
1 for Vega,
1 for Sirius,
1 for Procyon,
1 for Lalande,
1 for Epsilon Eri.
1 for the carbon star S Cephei (based on color - a very deep red)
1 for the Binary star - Gamma Andromedae
1 for Trinary star - Beta Monocerotis
1 or Sol (our sun)

Of Constalations, Nebula, deep space objects and others; :huh:
1 for Lyra,
1 for Orion,
1 for Andromeda,
1 for Veil Nebula,
2 for Ring Nebula,(M57)
1 for Open cluster - NGC 3532
1 for Globular cluster - NGC 5139
1 for Emission nebula - the Eta Carinae Nebula (NGC 3372)
1 for the Large Magellanic Cloud
2 for the Milky Way
and 1 for the distance from our Solar System to Alpha Centauri.


How about some more deep space objects. And I haven&#39;t heard of any quasars yet. :P

Dave Mitsky
2003-Oct-02, 05:16 AM
Planetwatcher,

I&#39;ll repeat what I said in a previous posting. Omega Centauri is not a single star. It is in fact the globular cluster NGC 5139.

Dave Mitsky

zephyr46
2003-Oct-02, 05:33 AM
Yeah&#33; My fave moving group Ursa Major, no place like home, and I&#39;m realy into moving groups at the moment, Castor, for multiple star systems, and Solstation.com for websites on Astronomy, I think I may have already voted for the co-orbital asteroids, And what about Varuna? B)

Planetwatcher
2003-Oct-04, 08:18 AM
Omega Centauri is not a single star. It is in fact the globular cluster NGC 5139.
Sorry about that Dave. I knew I was forgeting something in that update. Omaga Centauri properly belongs where I loosely put constalations, nebulas, and other.

What happened was I copied and pasted the previous talley changing the numbers to reflect the new total, and then added the newest ones at the bottom of each catagory. Otherwise I would have printed a copy of the whole list, wrote in the changes, and retyped it all, and as you can see it is getting quite large.

Tell you what, since I have only one additional entry since the last update, I&#39;ll do another copy and paste, this time putting Omega Centaur where it belongs. I&#39;ll add the latest addititon and call it an update as of midnite Oct 3rd into the 4th.

To zephyr46 Please correct me if I&#39;m wrong but isn&#39;t Varuna one of the larger asteroids in the asteroid belt? If I remember correctly.

Planetwatcher
2003-Oct-04, 08:40 AM
Hello everyone;

These are the totals as of midnight Oct. 3rd going into the 4th.

Of the planets
14 for Saturn,
8 for Jupiter,
4 for Mars,
3 for Earth,
1 for Uranus,
1 for Neptune,
and 0 for Venus, Mercury, and Pluto (so far)

Of the moons, and objects sharing our orbit
7 for Earths moon,
3 for Europa of Jupiter,
2 for Io of Jupiter,
2 for Titan, Saturn&#39;s largest moon,
1 for all of Saturn&#39;s moons,
1 for Titania of Uranus,
1 for Proteaus of Neptune,
1 for Despina of Neptune, (and a very pretty name too.)
1 for 3753 Cruithne
1 for 2002 AA29
{I know Cruithne and AA29 are really not moons in their own right, because moons orbit a planet, asteroid, or Kupier object, whereas these two are really asteroids sharing Earth&#39;s orbit of the Sun, but not orbiting Earth like the Moon}

Of asteroids, comets, and Kupier objects
2 for Comet Hale/Bopp,
2 for Halley&#39;s Comet
1 for Comet Hyakutake,
1 for Comet Kohutek,
1 for Kupier object 2002 Ny401,
1 for IIIapa,
1 for Quanor,
1 for Chiron,
1 for Varuna,

Of stars
3 for Alpha Centauri,
1 for our Sun Sol,
1 for Vega,
1 for Sirius,
1 for Procyon,
1 for Lalande,
1 for Epsilon Eri.
1 for the carbon star S Cephei (based on color - a very deep red)
1 for the Binary star - Gamma Andromedae
1 for Trinary star - Beta Monocerotis
1 for Sol (our sun)
1 for Castor, (a multiple star system)

Of Constalations, Galaxies, Star clusters, Nebula, deep space objects and others;
2 for Ring Nebula,(M57)
2 for the Milky Way,
1 for Lyra,
1 for Orion,
1 for Andromeda,
1 for Veil Nebula,
1 for Omega Centauri,
1 for Open cluster - NGC 3532
1 for Globular cluster - NGC 5139
1 for Emission nebula - the Eta Carinae Nebula (NGC 3372)
1 for the Large Magellanic Cloud,
1 for Ursa Major,
and 1 for the distance from our Solar System to Alpha Centauri.

We also got 1 for a favoritte astronomy web site, but I don&#39;t think I want to get into that kind of list. :unsure:
That could quickly become chaos with dozens if not hundreds of web sites listed, and proabley with hyperlinks too. :huh:
But if someone else wants to open a string for favoritte astronomy web sites, have at it. ;)
But I would hope it&#39;s a given that everyone&#39;s favoritte is UNIVERSE TODAY. :D
If not, remember where you are right now. ;)

Haglund
2003-Oct-05, 10:59 AM
Jupiter, 5.20 AU from Sol, diameter: 142,984 km, mass: 1.900e27 kg.
The largest and most massive of all our planets. What I like about it is mostly perhaps its upper visible clouds including of course the great red spot. I&#39;ve observed it through a telescope, and it&#39;s quite a view. I could see at least two major characteristics in its atmosphere (two darker reddish stripes on a bleak-yellowish "background"). And the red spot of course.

Europa and Io are two of my favourites among its moons. Two very different moons, one is the most volcanic world we know of, and the other may have subglacial oceans, possibly with life.

Saturn, 9.54 AU from Sol, diameter: 120,536 km, mass: 5.68e26 kg.
This one is in my opinion an obvious choice... It is simply great to look at, for one, and the rings fascinate me. Especially the ring consisting of two rings twisted about each other like a rope... intriguing. I&#39;ve seen Saturn through a small telescope too. The images from Voyager were great and stunning, but somehow it&#39;s a special feeling to actually see this planet with your own eyes. To me it appeared almost white. The rings clearly visible. An amazing sight which words can not describe&#33; :)

Titan is my favourite of Saturn&#39;s moons. With an atmospheric pressure greater than that on Earth, and with oceans of hydrocarbons, this can not be anything but interesting.

Neptune, 30.06 AU from Sol, diameter: 49,532 km, mass: 1.0247e26 kg.
This one I like perhaps mostly because it has a great dark spot, similar to that of Jupiter. Why does it have one, and why does some planets not have such a spot?

Triton is my favourite Neptune moon. Apparently it orbits backwards, and will probably get closer to Neptune in a distant future and maybe break up, giving Neptune a ring system. But it is the ice geysers that really caught my interest. Plumes of liquid nitrogen, methane and other compunds, several km straight up. Should be something to seea bit more upclose.

Milky Way, of course. It&#39;s rare that I ever get to see the actual "ribbon" of stars across the sky, but it has happened. One time was especially great, when I took my telescope to a small airfield, that is rarely ever used, one especially clear night. No artificial lights, clear sky, and the Milky Way appeared so bright and wide it was impossible to really spot most of the constellations. An extraordinary sight.

The Pleiades is a group of stars that I like as well.

Polly V
2003-Oct-05, 04:12 PM
Since i have a very small telescope, I&#39;d have to say my favorite planet would be Jupitier. To see it with my own eyes as well as i can, just takes my breath away. My second favorite is the Moon, its given me lots of practice with the telescope, and well I have lost many hours just looking at the terrain.

I&#39;m sure if I had a more powerful instrument the list would be rather lenghty :D

zephyr46
2003-Oct-13, 02:36 AM
The Great Wall (http://solstation.com/x-objects.htm), without a doubt, and the great attractor, M87 (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap000706.html), in the Virgo supercluster,

Planet Watcher :(

, how could you call the galactic center just a black hole? :(
some of the entities habiting the galactic center (http://zephyr46.tripod.com/eaglenebula/id6.html) :)
Varuna (http://www.ifa.hawaii.edu/faculty/jewitt/varuna.html)

Planetwatcher
2003-Oct-13, 03:56 AM
, how could you call the galactic center just a black hole?
I only vaguely remember that. Must of been on another page or string sometime back, and I think I was kidding.

zephyr46; you could of just said of Varuna was an asteroid instead of troubling yourself to send a hyperlink. Now I gotta go click on it. ;)

zephyr46
2003-Oct-13, 04:03 AM
2nd page, ninth post down :angry: you said it was just a black hole, if I were going to nominate an interesting black hole I would say Cygnus X1,
Though pulsars and neutron stars are more interesting, I think :)

Dan Luna
2003-Oct-14, 03:39 PM
Another vote for the Moon. It&#39;s fantastic to be able to look through a few bits of glass and see another world in so much detail. Seeing it directly for oneself makes it feel so much more real than images from probes.

Planetwatcher
2003-Oct-14, 06:50 PM
Okay zephyr46 I found it.

If that statement offended you, please accept my appologies.
I was indeed joking, and eluding to a recent (at that time) news article from Universe today about the Chandra telescope probe seeing a giant blackhole supposively at the center of our galaxy. :blink:

zephyr46
2003-Oct-15, 01:17 AM
No apologies neccessary, I should clarify, from the center out to W49 (http://www.eso.org/outreach/press-rel/pr-2003/pr-20-03.html) and anything in between, particularly THIS (http://rsd-www.nrl.navy.mil/7213/lazio/GC/). If anyone has something that shows the scale of this image with one in visible light :D . This is the greatest topic :D , are you accepting favorite Bok Globules (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap030127.html)?

Matthew
2003-Oct-15, 10:04 AM
Saturn is my favourite planet. But celestial object? Black holes or neutron stars. I think it might be that they are not fully understood.

Planetwatcher
2003-Oct-15, 07:11 PM
I aggree Matthew. There is so much out there not known.
I myself haven&#39;t even picked out a favoritte galaxy, star cluster, nebula, or even constalation. Perhaps I should start thinking about it. :D

Matthew
2003-Oct-16, 09:04 AM
Is it really necessary Planetwatcher?

starrman
2003-Oct-17, 10:00 PM
I recently assisted at a star party for a group of elementary school students. The results on the "Wow&#33;" scale may have been skewed due to the absence of the moon and Saturn, but Mars was well-placed and showed well in various instruments. I was surprised, though, when I got request after request to view Uranus and Neptune. While they are lovely sights, they&#39;re fairly unremarkable compared to other solar system objects. But one kid after another lined up to see them, commenting on how cool it was to see something almost 3 billion miles away, how huge they must be to show as discs at the distances from us, making very astute comments on the gas composition of the atmospheres that resulted in the beautiful colors we could see. It became very clear to me that the "Wow&#33;" factor is profoundly connected to the level of education that one brings to the eyepiece. These kids had spent time learning and talking about what they were seeing, and that meant that they saw much more. Impressive.

John

Planetwatcher
2003-Oct-19, 11:31 PM
I myself haven&#39;t even picked out a favoritte galaxy, star cluster, nebula, or even constalation. Perhaps I should start thinking about it.


Is it really necessary Planetwatcher?

No not really necessary. I&#39;m just trying to keep this string going and be a good example, considering I started this particular one. B)

But it also displays my own ignorance of deep space objects, and rather quickly at that. I&#39;ve just not been as interested in the deep space like I am in the much closer objects. Not that they are any less interesting. But perhaps I place more heed in that which I would like to think of as possibley achieveable for humans to visit some day. :huh:

Which I suppose really isn&#39;t fair either, because at current and forseeable technology, it is just as improable to visit stars just a few light years away, or even remote bodies in our own solar system, as it is to visit some galaxy, star cluster, nebula, or even quasar which are thousands to billions of light years away.
The impossibility is equally impossible, just like you can&#39;t make a dead person any deader. Dead is dead and impossible is impossible. :(
But we still like to hope don&#39;t we. :P

zephyr46
2003-Oct-27, 01:17 AM
I&#39;m currently cheating on the GC with the Rho Ophiuchi region (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap000521.html)
:rolleyes:

Haglund
2003-Oct-30, 06:05 PM
Originally posted by zephyr46@Oct 27 2003, 01:17 AM
I&#39;m currently cheating on the GC with the Rho Ophiuchi region (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap000521.html)
:rolleyes:
Excellent choice&#33; One of the most colourful places.

Tripoli-Kid
2003-Oct-30, 08:55 PM
B) The one and only Io

khepri
2003-Oct-30, 11:16 PM
:rolleyes: A difficult choice, here my favorite three
1. Constalation of Orion
2. Globular Cluster 47 Tucanae / NGC 104
3. Spiral Galaxy M100

zephyr46
2003-Oct-31, 01:43 AM
Rho Ophiuchi region fans, my find a couple of images here
montage sample mosaics (http://montage.ipac.caltech.edu/gallery.html)
interesting&#33;

47 Tucanae (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/apod/apod_search?47+tucanae) Spiral Galaxy M100 (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/apod/apod_search?Spiral+Galaxy+M100+), very nice
And Orion (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/apod/apod_search?Orion)
That was the second constellation I learnt after the The Southern Cross (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/apod/apod_search?the+southern+cross)

My favorite galaxy (after the milky way) would have to be the Whirlpool Galaxy (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/apod/apod_search?The+whirlpool+galaxy) or the Andromeda Galaxy (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/apod/apod_search?Andromeda+galaxy)
and favorite constellation Scorpius (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/apod/apod_search?Scorpius), Sagittarius (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/apod/apod_search?Sagittarius) or Corona Australis (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/apod/apod_search?corona+australis), and if anyone knows of any good pictures of the southern crown, I&#39;d love to see them :)

Planetwatcher
2003-Nov-03, 04:43 AM
I&#39;m glad to see that this string is still going and going.
I haven&#39;t tabulated an update in a month now, so I&#39;m going to get that done in the next couple days. :P

zephyr46
2003-Nov-04, 05:34 AM
Good Luck :)

My new favorite nebula in the LMC (http://www.eso.org/outreach/press-rel/pr-2003/phot-31-03.html)

:lol:

chicagoastronomer
2003-Nov-04, 07:57 AM
In the early seventies, when I was a kid, I got my first telescope - a 3" refractor. Prior to that, I used 10X50 Binos, but always wishing for a telescope.

One clear spring evening I was just peering thru the scope, observing stars at random...bright ones, dim ones, blue ones etc...when just by chance I stumbled onto this object that was yellow..had detail....Oh my gosh&#33;&#33;&#33; It was Saturn&#33;&#33;&#33; I saw countless pictures of the planet before in magazines and books, but there it was....actually in my eyepiece. To this day I still anticipate first view of Saturn and get a chill when my fov captures it.

I can spend countless hours observing the moon, from cresent phase to cresent phase. Discovering new objects and reaquainting with old. Jupiter is cool too, and with proper filters, the bands intrigue me. Although Mars came close to Earth this year, I was not really impressed with it. Granted my modest 4.5" is not the optimum equipment for best views, it was ok...showing me cap and terrestrial features.

Hard to view deep space objects here in the Heart of Chicago, but the Orion Nebula, with it&#39;s ghostly apparition, is always a treat in the depths of a cold and bitter winter night. But the Plaides in the fall always makes me smile when the sisters shine like diamonds in a mist thru my scope. Too cool.

To recap: 1. Saturn 2. Moon. 3. Jupiter 4. Plaides/Orion

Matthew
2003-Nov-04, 08:00 AM
But it also displays my own ignorance of deep space objects, and rather quickly at that. I&#39;ve just not been as interested in the deep space like I am in the much closer objects. Not that they are any less interesting. But perhaps I place more heed in that which I would like to think of as possibley achieveable for humans to visit some day.

Well Planetwatcher I am the opposite of you, I prefer to look into deep space than the solar system.

Haglund
2003-Nov-04, 07:38 PM
Chicagoastronomer:
I have to agree with you on Saturn, it was amazing to see it with my own eyes&#33; The largest details I saw was the tiny planet itself and the rings, nothing more. But that was certainly more than necessary&#33; :) The feeling of seeing the planets for real (also have seen Jupiter, quite a sight too&#33;) is great.

zephyr46
2003-Nov-05, 12:11 AM
So true, a freind of mine had a telescope for years, we were living together and got his telescope and for the first time I had to identify what we were looking at, we pointed at a bright star and what do you you know&#33; it had three small companions, Juipiter, then Saturn amazing. this is like three years ago. I could find epsilon eridani, at the time, the closest extra-solar planet contender, but I still hadn&#39;t seen those two. But most of my favorites, I still see in pictures, no telescopes near me yet. But thats, Ok I like just looking at the sky with my eyes at the moment.

Planetwatcher
2003-Nov-10, 07:09 AM
Hello folks, It&#39;s been much too long since I updated the list, so I will do so now.

Of the planets :P
18 for Saturn,
13 for Jupiter,
6 for Mars,
3 for Earth,
3 for Neptune,
2 for Uranus,
and still 0 for Venus, Mercury.

Of the moons, and objects sharing our orbit :)
10 for Earths moon,
5 for Io of Jupiter,
4 for Europa of Jupiter,
3 for Titan, Saturn&#39;s largest moon,
1 for all of Saturn&#39;s moons,
1 for Titania, largest moon of Uranus,
1 fro Triton, Neptune&#39;s largest moon,
1 for Proteaus of Neptune,
1 for Despina of Neptune, (and a very pretty name too.)
1 for 3753 Cruithne
1 for 2002 AA29
{I know Cruithne and AA29 are really not moons in their own right, but are really asteroids sharing Earth&#39;s orbit of the Sun, but not orbiting Earth like the Moon}

Of asteroids, comets, and Kupier objects :rolleyes:
2 for Comet Hale/Bopp,
2 for Halley&#39;s Comet,
2 for Varuna, was the 2nd largest Kupier object until Quanor was discovered.
1 for Comet Hyakutake,
1 for Comet Kohutek,
1 for Kupier object 2002 Ny401,
1 for IIIapa,
1 for Quanor, largest Kupier object after Pluto,
1 for Chiron,

Of stars ;)
3 for Alpha Centauri,
2 for Epsilon Eridani, (the next nearest star known to have any planets)
2 for our Sun Sol,
1 for Vega,
1 for Sirius,
1 for Procyon,
1 for Lalande,
1 for the carbon star S Cephei (based on color - a very deep red)
1 for the Binary star - Gamma Andromedae
1 for Trinary star - Beta Monocerotis
1 for Castor, (a multiple star system)

Of Galaxies, Star clusters, Nebula, and deep space objects :o
2 for Ring Nebula,(M57)
3 for the Milky Way,
2 for Andromeda,
2 for Rho Ophiuchi,
2 for Tucanac, (also known as NGC104)
1 for Veil Nebula,
1 for Omega Centauri,
1 for Open cluster - NGC 3532
1 for Globular cluster - NGC 5139
1 for Emission nebula - the Eta Carinae Nebula (NGC 3372)
1 for the Large Magellanic Cloud,
1 for M87,
1 for Galaxy M100,
1 for the Whirlpool Galaxy,
1 for Cluster 47,

Of Constalations :D
4 for Orion,
3 for Pleiades, (Also know as the Seven Sisters)
1 for the Southern Cross,
1 for Ursa Major,
1 for Lyra,
1 for Scorpius,
1 for Sagittarius,
1 for Corona Australis,

Others :blink:
1 for the Great Wall (Don&#39;t know what that is)
1 for CygunsX1 (a black hole)
and 1 for the distance from our Solar System to Alpha Centauri.

That is 61 total objects tabulated. :huh:
The deep space catagory has the most number of objects voted for. 15 total. :o
The Planets catagory has the most number of votes. 45 total. B)
The over all top dozen vote getters are B)
Saturn 18, the landslide favoritee,
Jupiter 13,
Our Moon 10,
Mars 6,
Io 5,
Europa 4,
Orion 4,
Pleiades 3,
Titan 3,
Alpha Centauri 3,
Neptune 3,
The Milky Way 3,

I see no reason to end this yet, but I do want to thank everyone who has participated in this string. Anyone else out there can still add their favorittes.
Just post it here. ;)

Planetwatcher
2003-Nov-10, 07:12 AM
This is the greatest topic , are you accepting favorite Bok Globules
I see no reason why not.

Dave Mitsky
2003-Nov-10, 08:34 AM
Planetwatcher,

Thanks for tabulating the results so far. However, a few corrections are in order. It&#39;s 47 Tucanae (NGC 104), Omega Centauri is the same object as NGC 5139, and the Pleiades (M45) is actually an open star cluster. Furthermore there should be a number associated with Lalande, perhaps 21185?

The Great Wall is a supercluster of galaxies - http://www.angelfire.com/id/jsredshift/grtwall.htm and http://www.zyx.org/WALL.html

Dave Mitsky

Planetwatcher
2003-Nov-10, 07:24 PM
Dave, as usual you are correct. I will make the changes on the next update.
Like many others I don&#39;t generally include the numbers 21185 for Lalande.

I tend to get lazy and shorten it to just Lalande. However I&#39;m not aware of anything else called Lalande with other numbers.

Dave Mitsky
2003-Nov-11, 11:09 PM
Originally posted by Planetwatcher@Nov 10 2003, 07:24 PM

However I&#39;m not aware of anything else called Lalande with other numbers.
The French astronomer Joseph LaLande cataloged some 47,000 stars, hence the identification numbers in the Lalande Catalog.

Dave Mitsky

damienpaul
2003-Dec-20, 03:44 PM
Well to invigourate this topic&#33; i will say Mercury, Venus, Ceres, Mars, Europa and Titan...

and that concludes the voting of the Damo jury...

Planetwatcher
2003-Dec-21, 11:16 PM
I might as well update this and get in the corrections Dave Mitsky pointed out.

Of the planets
18 for Saturn,
13 for Jupiter,
7 for Mars,
3 for Earth,
3 for Neptune,
2 for Uranus,
1 for Mercury,
1 for Venus,

Of the moons, and objects sharing our orbit
10 for Earths moon,
5 for Io of Jupiter,
5 for Europa of Jupiter,
4 for Titan, Saturn&#39;s largest moon,
1 for all of Saturn&#39;s moons,
1 for Titania, largest moon of Uranus,
1 fro Triton, Neptune&#39;s largest moon,
1 for Proteaus of Neptune,
1 for Despina of Neptune, (and a very pretty name too.)
1 for 3753 Cruithne
1 for 2002 AA29
{I know Cruithne and AA29 are really not moons in their own right, but are really asteroids sharing Earth&#39;s orbit of the Sun, but not orbiting Earth like the Moon}

Of asteroids, comets, and Kupier objects
2 for Comet Hale/Bopp,
2 for Halley&#39;s Comet,
2 for Varuna, (was the 2nd largest Kupier object until Quanor was discovered.)
1 for Comet Hyakutake,
1 for Ceres, (the largest asteroid in the asteroid belt)
1 for Comet Kohutek,
1 for Kupier object 2002 Ny401,
1 for IIIapa,
1 for Quanor, largest Kupier object after Pluto,
1 for Chiron,

Of stars
3 for Alpha Centauri,
2 for Epsilon Eridani, (the next nearest star known to have any planets)
2 for our Sun Sol,
1 for Vega,
1 for Sirius,
1 for Procyon,
1 for Lalande 21185,
1 for the carbon star S Cephei (based on color - a very deep red)
1 for the Binary star - Gamma Andromedae
1 for Trinary star - Beta Monocerotis
1 for Castor, (a multiple star system)

Of Galaxies, Star clusters, Nebula, and deep space objects
4 for Omega Centauri,
2 for Ring Nebula,(M57)
3 for the Milky Way,
3 for Pleiades, (Also know as the Seven Sisters)
2 for Andromeda,
2 for Rho Ophiuchi,
1 for Veil Nebula,
1 for Open cluster - NGC 3532
1 for Emission nebula - the Eta Carinae Nebula (NGC 3372)
1 for the Large Magellanic Cloud,
1 for M87,
1 for Galaxy M100,
1 for the Whirlpool Galaxy,
1 for Cluster 47,

Of Constalations
4 for Orion,
1 for the Southern Cross,
1 for Ursa Major,
1 for Lyra,
1 for Scorpius,
1 for Sagittarius,
1 for Corona Australis,

Others
1 for the Great Wall (a supercluster of galaxies)
1 for CygunsX1 (a black hole)
and 1 for the distance from our Solar System to Alpha Centauri.

That is 62 total objects tabulated.
The deep space catagory has the most number of objects voted for. 15 total.
The Planets catagory has the most number of votes. 48 total.
The over all top dozen vote getters are
Saturn 18, the landslide favoritee,
Jupiter 13,
Our Moon 10,
Mars 7,
Io 5,
Europa 5,
Orion 4,
Omega Centauri,
Titan 4,
Alpha Centauri 3,
Neptune 3,
Pleiades 3,

Somebody mentioned Bok Globules before. We can add them in too.

damienpaul
2003-Dec-22, 01:44 AM
add in Saturn and teh Southern Cross constellation ...that concludes the voting of the Damo&#39;s better half jury

Planetwatcher
2003-Dec-22, 07:17 PM
add in Saturn and teh Southern Cross constellation ...that concludes the voting of the Damo&#39;s better half jury
Okay that makes 19 for Saturn, and two for the Southern Cross placing it solid second place of the constalations.

I wish I could see the Southern Cross. :(
That is one advantage of being down under. Even though your seasons are screwed up. :P

Sooo, does anyone else want to vote for Saturn, and make it an even 20?

jimmy
2003-Dec-22, 08:41 PM
O.K. i&#39;ll make it 20. I was resisting. but Saturn is irresistable. While I&#39;m here let&#39;s add Spica to the list&#33; And another one for our good old moon&#33; And of course, Orion.

Littlemews
2003-Dec-22, 10:52 PM
Sometime Moon is older than planets. :lol:

seeker372011
2003-Dec-23, 12:12 AM
Can you vote for more than one favourite object? If yes my vote(s) go to Saturn, M42, Tuc 47 and the Eta Carina nebula

seeker

damienpaul
2003-Dec-23, 03:51 AM
Add Antares to mine...also coule we get an updated stats&#33;?

Planetwatcher
2004-Jan-05, 03:12 PM
I thought it was about time to update, and here damienpaul has asked for one.
Thanks for your patence.
Yes you can vote for more then one, you can admend or otherwise add. I would rather not outright change a vote from one to another, so just add instead.

With all this attention on Mars, anyone else want to add it in? Curently Mars is in 3rd place among the planets, and 4th place of everything.


Of the planets
21 for Saturn,
13 for Jupiter,
7 for Mars,
3 for Earth,
3 for Neptune,
2 for Uranus,
1 for Mercury,
1 for Venus,

Of the moons, and objects sharing our orbit
12 for Earths moon,
5 for Io of Jupiter,
5 for Europa of Jupiter,
4 for Titan, Saturn&#39;s largest moon,
1 for all of Saturn&#39;s moons,
1 for Titania, largest moon of Uranus,
1 fro Triton, Neptune&#39;s largest moon,
1 for Proteaus of Neptune,
1 for Despina of Neptune,
1 for 3753 Cruithne
1 for 2002 AA29

Of asteroids, comets, and Kupier objects
2 for Comet Hale/Bopp,
2 for Halley&#39;s Comet,
2 for Varuna, (was the 2nd largest Kupier object until Quanor was discovered.)
1 for Comet Hyakutake,
1 for Ceres, (the largest asteroid in the asteroid belt)
1 for Comet Kohutek,
1 for Kupier object 2002 Ny401,
1 for IIIapa,
1 for Quanor, largest Kupier object after Pluto,
1 for Chiron,

Of stars
3 for Alpha Centauri,
2 for Epsilon Eridani, (the next nearest star known to have any planets)
2 for our Sun Sol,
1 for Vega,
1 for Sirius,
1 for Procyon,
1 for Lalande 21185,
1 for the carbon star S Cephei (based on color - a very deep red)
1 for the Binary star - Gamma Andromedae
1 for Trinary star - Beta Monocerotis
1 for Castor, (a multiple star system)
1 for Spica,
1 for Antares,

Of Galaxies, Star clusters, Nebula, and deep space objects
4 for Omega Centauri,
2 for Ring Nebula,(M57)
3 for the Milky Way,
3 for Pleiades, (Also know as the Seven Sisters)
2 for Andromeda,
2 for Rho Ophiuchi,
1 for Veil Nebula,
1 for Open cluster - NGC 3532
1 for Emission nebula - the Eta Carinae Nebula (NGC 3372)
1 for the Large Magellanic Cloud,
1 for M87,
1 for Galaxy M100,
1 for the Whirlpool Galaxy,
1 for Cluster 47,
1 for Eta Carina nebula,
1 for M 42,
1 for Tuc 47,


Of Constalations
5 for Orion,
2 for the Southern Cross,
1 for Ursa Major,
1 for Lyra,
1 for Scorpius,
1 for Sagittarius,
1 for Corona Australis,

Others
1 for the Great Wall (a supercluster of galaxies)
1 for CygunsX1 (a black hole)
and 1 for the distance from our Solar System to Alpha Centauri.

That is 67 total objects tabulated.
The deep space catagory has the most number of objects voted for. 18 total.
The Planets catagory has the most number of votes. 51 total.

The over all top dozen vote getters are
Saturn 21, the landslide favoritee,
Jupiter 13,
Our Moon 12,
Mars 7,
Io 5,
Europa 5,
Orion 5,
Omega Centauri 4,
Titan 4,
Alpha Centauri 3,
Neptune 3,
Pleiades 3,

damienpaul
2004-Jan-05, 11:25 PM
thank you for that planetwatcher&#33;

i have polled 16 of my students (who are online at varying times)

saturn - 9
mars - 3
mercury, venus, neptune, our moon - 1 each

Planetwatcher
2004-Jan-06, 06:58 PM
Thank you. I will add them in.

damienpaul
2004-Jan-06, 11:02 PM
thanks for that, they would appreciate it

Planetwatcher
2004-Jan-07, 09:34 AM
Here is the latest update. Even though it&#39;s only been two days, we just got in 16 more votes thanks to damienpaul&#39;s class. Perhaps Tinaa&#39;s class can follow the same example.

Of the planets
30 for Saturn,
13 for Jupiter,
10 for Mars,
4 for Neptune,
3 for Earth,
2 for Uranus,
2 for Mercury,
2 for Venus,

Of the moons, and objects sharing our orbit
13 for Earths moon,
5 for Io of Jupiter,
5 for Europa of Jupiter,
4 for Titan, Saturn&#39;s largest moon,
1 for all of Saturn&#39;s moons,
1 for Titania, largest moon of Uranus,
1 fro Triton, Neptune&#39;s largest moon,
1 for Proteaus of Neptune,
1 for Despina of Neptune,
1 for 3753 Cruithne
1 for 2002 AA29

Of asteroids, comets, and Kupier objects
2 for Comet Hale/Bopp,
2 for Halley&#39;s Comet,
2 for Varuna, (was the 2nd largest Kupier object until Quanor was discovered.)
1 for Comet Hyakutake,
1 for Ceres, (the largest asteroid in the asteroid belt)
1 for Comet Kohutek,
1 for Kupier object 2002 Ny401,
1 for IIIapa,
1 for Quanor, largest Kupier object after Pluto,
1 for Chiron,

Of stars
3 for Alpha Centauri,
2 for Epsilon Eridani, (the next nearest star known to have any planets)
2 for our Sun Sol,
1 for Vega,
1 for Sirius,
1 for Procyon,
1 for Lalande 21185,
1 for the carbon star S Cephei (based on color - a very deep red)
1 for the Binary star - Gamma Andromedae
1 for Trinary star - Beta Monocerotis
1 for Castor, (a multiple star system)
1 for Spica,
1 for Antares,

Of Galaxies, Star clusters, Nebula, and deep space objects
4 for Omega Centauri,
2 for Ring Nebula,(M57)
3 for the Milky Way,
3 for Pleiades, (Also know as the Seven Sisters)
2 for Andromeda,
2 for Rho Ophiuchi,
1 for Veil Nebula,
1 for Open cluster - NGC 3532
1 for Emission nebula - the Eta Carinae Nebula (NGC 3372)
1 for the Large Magellanic Cloud,
1 for M87,
1 for Galaxy M100,
1 for the Whirlpool Galaxy,
1 for Cluster 47,
1 for Eta Carina nebula,
1 for M 42,
1 for Tuc 47,


Of Constalations
5 for Orion,
2 for the Southern Cross,
1 for Ursa Major,
1 for Lyra,
1 for Scorpius,
1 for Sagittarius,
1 for Corona Australis,

Others
1 for the Great Wall (a supercluster of galaxies)
1 for CygunsX1 (a black hole)
and 1 for the distance from our Solar System to Alpha Centauri.

That is 67 total objects tabulated.
The deep space catagory has the most number of objects voted for. 18 total.
The Planets catagory has the most number of votes. 66 total.

We have had some movement of the top dozen. Neptune has moved up 4 spots.
(nice thing to happen to my favoritte planet)
Our moon is now tied with Jupiter for a very distant 2nd place. Saturn continues to command the lead, and it&#39;s margin just gets bigger. Mars remains in 4th, but just a few more votes can move it up to 2nd, which I think will happen as the rover&#39;s coverage of Mars continues, and especially if Oppertunity is successful.
I look for Titan to move as dramaticly in July when the Cassini probe arrives, but this month&#39;s the fame is for Mars.

The over all top dozen vote getters are
Saturn 30, (the landslide favoritee,)
Jupiter 13,
Our Moon 13,
Mars 10,
Io 5,
Europa 5,
Orion 5,
Neptune 4,
Omega Centauri 4,
Titan 4,
Alpha Centauri 3,
Pleiades 3,

Sp1ke
2004-Jan-15, 04:19 PM
I&#39;ve only just started reading this thread. Great idea having a "top ten" of favourite objects. I&#39;d like to add mine:

Favourite planet: Mars (because it&#39;s the closest and we&#39;ve got amazing pictures of its surface)

Favourite moon: Ours (because it&#39;s so easy to see; particularly good with binoculars)

Favourite constellation: Pleiades (great with naked eye, binoculars, telescope, anything)

Favourite star: Betelgeuse (marvellous red colour, easy to find)

Favourite deep sky object: M42 (another easy one to find and interesting at any scale)

Planetwatcher
2004-Jan-19, 03:14 AM
Spike,
I&#39;m glad you like the format. Hopefully you like the forums as well.
I was begining to wonder if anyone was going to list Betelgeuse as a favoritte star.

M42 and Pleades will now each move up one, and Mars becomes a little more solid in it&#39;s spot.

Dave Mitsky
2004-Jan-20, 09:09 AM
Originally posted by Sp1ke@Jan 15 2004, 04:19 PM
I&#39;ve only just started reading this thread. Great idea having a "top ten" of favourite objects. I&#39;d like to add mine:

Favourite planet: Mars (because it&#39;s the closest and we&#39;ve got amazing pictures of its surface)

Favourite moon: Ours (because it&#39;s so easy to see; particularly good with binoculars)

Favourite constellation: Pleiades (great with naked eye, binoculars, telescope, anything)

Favourite star: Betelgeuse (marvellous red colour, easy to find)

Favourite deep sky object: M42 (another easy one to find and interesting at any scale)
Venus comes closer to Earth than does Mars at even the best of oppositions.

Dave Mitsky

damienpaul
2004-Jan-20, 09:39 AM
I have read that also, Dave, what are the closest approach distances?

Sp1ke
2004-Jan-20, 11:38 AM
Fair point. I said Mars was the closest without actually thinking it through, mainly because we&#39;ve got better pictures of it and there seems to be more interest in reaching it. Should be "...it&#39;s close to us..."

But if Venus is nearer, why do we seem to be aiming our explorations at Mars rather than Venus? Is it because Venus has a more hostile climate? Or the surface is less visible, so harder to plan a landing? Or is it that the potential for life on Mars makes for better publicity? Have we established that Venus has less chance of hosting some form of life?

damienpaul
2004-Jan-20, 04:40 PM
If you want to see all the facts of the planets, especially the information taht was just discussed, go to:

http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/imgcat/

VanderL
2004-Jan-20, 06:57 PM
I think Venus wás the first planet we went to for a landing (the Russki&#39;s actually), but it proved to be very hostile indeed, and photographing clouds from above, well how long is that headline news?
Cheers.

Planetwatcher
2004-Jan-20, 08:02 PM
But if Venus is nearer, why do we seem to be aiming our explorations at Mars rather than Venus? Is it because Venus has a more hostile climate? Yes. Venus is the greenhouse of greenhouses, except there are no plants.
It&#39;s surface temperture is actually hotter then the planet Mercury. In fact it is hot enough to melt lead.
Furthermore the atmosphereic presure is 90 times that of Earth. You know how heavy the air feels when it is hot and humid. Multiply that by 90.
In addition, the air is unbreathable to us, with a deathly high content of sulfer.

Or the surface is less visible, so harder to plan a landing?
Yes. There is much more volcanic activity on Venus then Earth. So hot lava flows cover more of the surface then it doesn&#39;t. With the shroud of clouds it is nearly impossible to find a location not drenched in hot lava.
If that is not enough, it rains sulferic acid. Even machinery can not survive long in such environments.
So if the heat doesn&#39;t melt your equipment, and the atmosphere doesn&#39;t crush it, then the acid will likely desolve it.

Or is it that the potential for life on Mars makes for better publicity? Have we established that Venus has less chance of hosting some form of life?
Yes again. It is very unlikely that there is or ever was anything alive on Venus.
It would be like living inside a volcano.
In contrast Mars is a giant iceberg, but for it&#39;s coldness life can more likely survive in extreame cold then extreame hot.
And it is thought to have once contained water. Which is essental to life as we know it. Unlike Venus which is very doubtful to have ever had water.

We&#39;ve been to the Moon. Venus is the next closest major body, but the probes we (mostly the Russians) have sent either was destroyed before landing, or very shortly afterward. Mars is the next closest, and therefore the logical next step.

After that is possibley some of the asteroids, and we have even landed on a couple of those, as well as a couple comets. So notwithstanding the current mission to Saturn&#39;s moon Titan, the next major focas will proabley be Jupiter&#39;s moons, unless we find something on Titan which is more interesting.

TheThorn
2004-Jan-21, 05:20 AM
I see everyone is finding the same problem: it&#39;s hard to pick just one favourite. Me too. I agree with all the wonderful things people have mentioned. But I&#39;ll mention a few that I like too.

I don&#39;t have a telescope, but I love looking at the night sky so my favourites will be slanted toward what I can see with nothing more than my eyeballs.

My favourite star would probably be Arcturus (although Rigel is up there), for two reasons. It&#39;s a neat star - bright, big, nearby, and it&#39;s a halo star that just happens to be cutting through our part of the galactic disk at the moment. Most of the time it spends outside the disk of the galaxy looking in - imagine THAT view. Also, I&#39;m very familiar with it in the summer sky, but in the middle of the winter, when I come home at 1 or 2 am, on one of those -30 degree clear nights, there it is just rising in the Eastern sky, letting me know in my gut that summer is coming, eventually.

My favourite planet would probably be Venus. It&#39;s so stunningly bright and beautiful at times. I&#39;ve even seen it in broad daylight on several occasions.

My favourite deep sky object would be the Milky Way itself (if that qualifies). On a cool clear summer night, it can be breathtaking.

Other things in the night sky that deserve mention but probably don&#39;t qualify for your list are the Northern Lights, and Iridium flares, both of which I love to watch.

damienpaul
2004-Jan-21, 05:44 AM
Can I ask what is an iridium flare? as this may affect my vote...:lol:

jimmy
2004-Jan-21, 06:48 AM
Iridium has communication satelites orbiting the earth and when the sun catches them at a certain angle they are really bright, as much or more than Venus. I learned about Iridium flares here at the forum.

TheThorn
2004-Jan-22, 04:37 AM
Originally posted by damienpaul@Jan 21 2004, 05:44 AM
Can I ask what is an iridium flare? as this may affect my vote...:lol:
What Jimmy said.

The neat thing is that they maintain the attitude of these satelites so precisely that it is possible to predict with great precision the time and location of the flares. Several programs are available to do this, and at least one guy has made personalized predictions available on the web. Check out http://www.heavens-above.com/.

These flares last 10 seconds or so and can get as bright as -8 magnitude. In a dark sky, they absolutelly dazzle the eyes, and have been the cause of a number of UFO reports. Well worth checking out.

There has been a lot of talk here about the "wow factor". Well, a -8 magnitude iridium flare never fails to bring wows from people who&#39;ve never seen one before. I love checking Heavens-Above for my location and telling visiting kids that my friends from outer space will be showing up shortly - right over there - right about... NOW, ah THERE THEY ARE&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33; <G>.

OK, so I&#39;m evil.

Planetwatcher
2004-Jan-22, 06:02 PM
I see everyone is finding the same problem: it&#39;s hard to pick just one favourite.
Who said you are limited to one? If you have several favourites go ahead and list them.


Other things in the night sky that deserve mention but probably don&#39;t qualify for your list are the Northern Lights, and Iridium flares, both of which I love to watch.
We can include them. I just don&#39;t know how I would list them.

TheThorn
2004-Jan-23, 01:00 AM
I forgot to mention my favourite constellation: Orion. When I was about 10 or 11 I&#39;d been reading about the stars, but they all just looked like stars to me - I couldn&#39;t identify any of them and I had no idea where to start. Then one early winter evening, I stepped outside at my Uncle&#39;s farm, and noticed these three stars all in a row near the horizon. And I realized that must be Orion&#39;s Belt that I&#39;d read about. I still vividly remember that flash of recognition, and I&#39;ve been looking up ever since.

Now if I could just convince my wife that a good telescope is a necessity, not a luxury.... OTOH, when I started thinking about how to answer this question, I came to realize just how much there is up there to see even with just you&#39;re natural 5mm of aperature.

damienpaul
2004-Jan-23, 11:52 AM
I am convinced - Iridium flares also get my vote as does the Saturniun moon Mimas -these can be added to my vote please.

Galaxy dweller
2004-Jan-24, 10:54 PM
My favorite in the Solar system is Europa - one of Jupiter&#39;s four Galilean moons. It looks like it is covered by a water ocean of huge thickness with moderate temperatures at certain depths suitable for life. Fascinating prospects for exploration&#33;

My favorite among the galaxies is of course the Milky Way. It&#39;s nice to live in a place which is full of practically inexhaustible mysteries and yet is your home.

Dave Mitsky
2004-Jan-26, 12:13 PM
Originally posted by damienpaul@Jan 21 2004, 05:44 AM
Can I ask what is an iridium flare? as this may affect my vote...:lol:
Iridium satellites were part of a failed communications system that eventually ended up costing Motorola a bundle. "Flares" occur when the highly reflective (silver coated teflon) panel antennae reflect sunlight downward to a rather localized area.

Here are some additional links:

http://www1.chapman.edu/oca/fa_iridium.html

http://www.assa.org.au/observing/iridium/

A photo of an Iridium flare that I took a few years ago is posted at http://dvaa.org/php/mpix.php?p=Dave_Mitsky...y&i=Flare042000 (http://dvaa.org/php/mpix.php?p=Dave_Mitsky&i=Flare042000)

Dave Mitsky

damienpaul
2004-Jan-26, 01:33 PM
I am definitely convinced about iridium flares, thank you for the pic Dave, now Planetwatcher can we have an update on the current poll?

jamerz3294
2004-Jan-26, 10:20 PM
Catching my breath to get caught up <_<
Fave planet is Jupiter
Fave moon is Io
Fave kuiper is Pluto (just cause it&#39;s there)
Fave DSO is the Crab Nebula
Fave place is my sideyard with my scope, or anyplace I&#39;m Geocaching B)

Dave Mitsky
2004-Jan-27, 01:44 PM
Originally posted by damienpaul@Jan 23 2004, 11:52 AM
I am convinced - Iridium flares also get my vote as does the Saturniun moon Mimas -these can be added to my vote please.
You&#39;re welcome. However, since Iridium flares are phenomena that are associated with artificial satellites I wonder why they should even be considered in this thread.

Dave Mitsky

Planetwatcher
2004-Feb-03, 07:49 PM
Of the planets
21 for Saturn,
14 for Jupiter,
8 for Mars,
3 for Earth,
3 for Neptune,
3 for Venus,
2 for Uranus,
1 for Mercury,
1 for Pluto,

Of the moons, and objects sharing our orbit
13 for Earths moon,
6 for Io of Jupiter,
6 for Europa of Jupiter,
4 for Titan, Saturn&#39;s largest moon,
1 for all of Saturn&#39;s moons,
1 for Mimas of Saturn,
1 for Titania, largest moon of Uranus,
1 fro Triton, Neptune&#39;s largest moon,
1 for Proteaus of Neptune,
1 for Despina of Neptune,
1 for 3753 Cruithne,
1 for 2002 AA29,
3 for Irridum flares,
1 for Northern Lights,

Of asteroids, comets, and Kupier objects
2 for Comet Hale/Bopp,
2 for Halley&#39;s Comet,
2 for Varuna, (was the 2nd largest Kupier object until Quanor was discovered.)
1 for Comet Hyakutake,
1 for Ceres, (the largest asteroid in the asteroid belt)
1 for Comet Kohutek,
1 for Kupier object 2002 Ny401,
1 for IIIapa,
1 for Quanor, largest Kupier object after Pluto,
1 for Chiron,
1 for Pluto, (same vote counted for planets, since Pluto is a planet & Kupier object)

Of stars
3 for Alpha Centauri,
2 for Epsilon Eridani, (the next nearest star known to have any planets)
2 for our Sun Sol,
1 for Betelgeuse,
1 for Arcturus,
1 for Rigel,
1 for Vega,
1 for Sirius,
1 for Procyon,
1 for Lalande 21185,
1 for the carbon star S Cephei (based on color - a very deep red)
1 for the Binary star - Gamma Andromedae
1 for Trinary star - Beta Monocerotis
1 for Castor, (a multiple star system)
1 for Spica,
1 for Antares,

Of Galaxies, Star clusters, Nebula, and deep space objects
4 for Omega Centauri,
2 for Ring Nebula,(M57)
5 for the Milky Way,
2 for Andromeda,
2 for Rho Ophiuchi,
1 for the Crab Nebula,
1 for Veil Nebula,
1 for Open cluster - NGC 3532
1 for Emission nebula - the Eta Carinae Nebula (NGC 3372)
1 for the Large Magellanic Cloud,
1 for M87,
1 for Galaxy M100,
1 for the Whirlpool Galaxy,
1 for Cluster 47,
1 for Eta Carina nebula,
2 for M 42,
1 for Tuc 47,


Of Constalations
6 for Orion,
4 for Pleiades, (Also know as the Seven Sisters)
2 for the Southern Cross,
1 for Ursa Major,
1 for Lyra,
1 for Scorpius,
1 for Sagittarius,
1 for Corona Australis,

Others
1 for the Great Wall (a supercluster of galaxies)
1 for CygunsX1 (a black hole)
and 1 for the distance from our Solar System to Alpha Centauri.

That is 75 total objects tabulated.
The deep space catagory has the most number of objects voted for. 17 total. I had in error counted Pleades as a deep space object. Acutally it is a constalation.)

The over all top dozen vote getters are
Saturn 21, the landslide favoritee,
Jupiter 14,
Our Moon 13,
Mars 8,
Io 6,
Europa 6,
Orion 6,
Omega Centauri 4,
Titan 4,
Alpha Centauri 3,
Pleiades 4,
Neptune 3,

LambdaWoman
2004-Feb-11, 10:12 PM
Hmm ok here are my favorites:

Planet: Mars. It&#39;s red, it&#39;s explorable (well all are technically, but what I mean is you can LAND on it and explore for a decent amount of time before the equipment gets fried- theoretically), and it may very well have life (or the remains of it). For a long time I wanted to be the first person on Mars. Now I don&#39;t really want to be an astronaut, just an astronomer would do.

Constellation: Orion. To this day it is one of the only ones I can find. I also love the Greek myth that goes along with it. Orion was a great hunter, and became the companion of the Hunter Goddess, Artemis. He was the only man she ever paid attention to, although she did not love him except as a friend. Her twin brother, Apollo, however, was jealous and sent a scorpion after Orion. The scorpion killed Orion, and Artemis was furious. But she couldn&#39;t be angry at her brother forever, and he hung Orion up in the stars. But he also hung the scorpion- and they will forever chase each other across the sky.

Star: Sirius. It&#39;s so beautiful&#33;&#33; I love just staring at it, especially on clear nights when the colors are very clear.

Dave Mitsky
2004-Feb-12, 08:22 AM
Originally posted by Planetwatcher@Feb 3 2004, 07:49 PM
That is 75 total objects tabulated.
The deep space catagory has the most number of objects voted for. 17 total. I had in error counted Pleades as a deep space object. Acutally it is a constalation.)


Planetwatcher,

The Pleiades is not a constellation. It is, in fact, a deep-sky object, an open star cluster that is designated Messier 45 (M45) and also NGC 1432.

Dave Mitsky

Planetwatcher
2004-Feb-13, 06:52 PM
That was an interesting bit of Greek mythology. A lot of celestrial bodies are named after figures in Greek mythology. Although we often associate and interchange with counterparts of Roman mythology.

For example Mercury is also known as Hermes, Venus is also Atheina, Mars has an equivelent in Aries the god of war. Jupiter&#39;s counterpart is Zeus, and Neptune is also Posidan. I don&#39;t know Saturn or Uranus&#39;s counterparts.
But I do know that many of Jupiter&#39;s moons were named after lovers and wives of the Jupiter god figure.

Interesting indeed. B)

Planetwatcher
2004-Feb-13, 07:13 PM
Dave I checked in StarfinderII, which does list the Pleades as a Messier object.
As for open cluster, perhaps I am not correctly understanding what an open cluster is. I have had the notion that an open cluster would be a large number of stars close to each other in actual vincinity, but not numourous enough, or large enough to be considered a galaxy.

In the case of the Pleades, (also known as the seven sisters, unless I&#39;m mistaken there as well) there are nine named stars and at least 4 unnamed ones which appear close together, except they are only in the same portion of sky from our vantage point. Each star lies at a very different distance from us.

Pleades has been refered to in ancient times, and is even mentioned in the Bible.
All of which was long before we knew about messier objects.
Could it be that it&#39;s been called a constelation all that time and was redesignated as a messier more recently?

If so I would think it actually has a duel citizenship.

Tinaa
2004-Feb-13, 10:37 PM
After seeing Dave&#39;s photo, I want to see an iridium flare with my own eyes. How would one know when there is a chance of seeing one?

jimmy
2004-Feb-15, 06:51 PM
Tinaa, I saw one before I knew what they were. I was really confused because it was brighter than ( at least as bright as ) Venus and Venus was nowhere around where this object was. A few minutes later I looked and the Bright object was no longer there. I posted the question in UT and Dave Mitsky said probably Iridium flare, Fraser confirmed.
Try this site to locate Iridium flares in your area: http://www.heavens-above.com/,
Jimmy.

Dave Mitsky
2004-Feb-16, 06:14 AM
Originally posted by Planetwatcher@Feb 13 2004, 07:13 PM
Dave I checked in StarfinderII, which does list the Pleades as a Messier object.
As for open cluster, perhaps I am not correctly understanding what an open cluster is. I have had the notion that an open cluster would be a large number of stars close to each other in actual vincinity, but not numourous enough, or large enough to be considered a galaxy.

In the case of the Pleades, (also known as the seven sisters, unless I&#39;m mistaken there as well) there are nine named stars and at least 4 unnamed ones which appear close together, except they are only in the same portion of sky from our vantage point. Each star lies at a very different distance from us.

Pleades has been refered to in ancient times, and is even mentioned in the Bible.
All of which was long before we knew about messier objects.
Could it be that it&#39;s been called a constelation all that time and was redesignated as a messier more recently?

If so I would think it actually has a duel citizenship.
Charles Messier compiled his catalog of nebulae, objects that looked somewhat like comets, his real interest, during the 18th century (see http://www.astrohbg.org/mitsky/messier.php for my article on Messier). The Messier catalog contains most of the brightest open and globular star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies. In fact, a number of the objects on the list such as M6, M7, M8, M31, M41, M44, and M45 were known from antiquity since they can be seen with the unaided eye under dark skies and were added merely to "round out" the list. See http://www.seds.org/messier/xtra/history/deepskyd.html for an excellent history of the discovery of deep-sky objects.

There&#39;s a fairly good treatment of star clusters at http://www.seds.org/messier/cluster.html

M45, the Pleiades (aka the Seven Sisters and Subaru), is the brightest open cluster and as such has been part of the mythology of countless ancient cultures. It is located in the constellation of Taurus and hence is not one of the 88 modern constellations - http://www.dibonsmith.com/constel.htm

Dave Mitsky

Planetwatcher
2004-Feb-16, 06:20 AM
It is located in the constellation of Taurus and hence is not one of the 88 modern constellations -
Okay, it&#39;s not modern, but what was it considered as by the astronomers of ancient times?

Algenon the mouse
2004-Feb-17, 08:09 PM
I like to look at rock structure so Mars is on the top of my list followed by the moons of Jupiter.

galaxygirl
2004-Feb-18, 12:30 AM
My favorite moon would have to be Miranda, but I&#39;m not sure about my favorite planet... they&#39;re all really interesting.

jamerz3294
2004-Feb-18, 10:25 PM
Originally posted by jimmy@Feb 15 2004, 06:51 PM
Try this site to locate Iridium flares in your area: http://www.heavens-above.com/,
Jimmy.
Jimmy; thanx for the site, it rocks&#33;&#33; I like it user friendly ease, and it also has a bunch of fun kewl stuff to track. Thx :D

Planetwatcher
2004-Apr-04, 09:22 AM
Golly, I haven&#39;t updated this since Febuary. I think it&#39;s about time.
There has been a little movement in positions. Venus moved up 3 spots, Sirus moved up a couple too. Orion is now in the top slot in constalations, and it moved up three spots in the top dozen. And Pleades is back in deep space objects and tied with the Milky Way for first place, and moved up 4 spots in the top dozen. Sooo, here they are;

Of the planets
21 for Saturn,
15 for Jupiter,
10 for Mars,
4 for Venus,
3 for Earth,
3 for Neptune,
2 for Uranus,
1 for Mercury,
1 for Pluto,

Of the moons, and objects sharing our orbit
13 for Earths moon,
6 for Io of Jupiter,
6 for Europa of Jupiter,
4 for Titan, Saturn&#39;s largest moon,
1 for all of Saturn&#39;s moons,
1 for Mimas of Saturn,
1 for Titania, largest moon of Uranus,
1 fro Triton, Neptune&#39;s largest moon,
1 for Proteaus of Neptune,
1 for Despina of Neptune,
1 for Miranda,
1 for 3753 Cruithne,
1 for 2002 AA29,
4 for Irridum flares,
1 for Northern Lights,

Of asteroids, comets, and Kupier objects
2 for Comet Hale/Bopp,
2 for Halley&#39;s Comet,
2 for Varuna, (was the 2nd largest Kupier object until Quanor was discovered.)
1 for Comet Hyakutake,
1 for Ceres, (the largest asteroid in the asteroid belt)
1 for Comet Kohutek,
1 for Kupier object 2002 Ny401,
1 for IIIapa,
1 for Quanor, largest Kupier object after Pluto,
1 for Chiron,
1 for Pluto, (same vote counted for planets, since Pluto is a planet & Kupier object)

Of stars
3 for Alpha Centauri,
2 for Epsilon Eridani, (the parent star of Vulcan the planet Spock is from)
2 for our Sun Sol,
2 for Sirius,
1 for Betelgeuse,
1 for Arcturus,
1 for Rigel,
1 for Vega,
1 for Procyon,
1 for Lalande 21185,
1 for the carbon star S Cephei (based on color - a very deep red)
1 for the Binary star - Gamma Andromedae
1 for Trinary star - Beta Monocerotis
1 for Castor, (a multiple star system)
1 for Spica,
1 for Antares,

Of Galaxies, Star clusters, Nebula, and deep space objects
5 for Pleiades, (Also know as the Seven Sisters)
5 for the Milky Way,
4 for Omega Centauri,
2 for Ring Nebula,(M57)
2 for Andromeda,
2 for Rho Ophiuchi,
1 for the Crab Nebula,
1 for Veil Nebula,
1 for Open cluster - NGC 3532
1 for Emission nebula - the Eta Carinae Nebula (NGC 3372)
1 for the Large Magellanic Cloud,
1 for M87,
1 for Galaxy M100,
1 for the Whirlpool Galaxy,
1 for Cluster 47,
1 for Eta Carina nebula,
2 for M 42,
1 for Tuc 47,


Of Constalations
7 for Orion,
2 for the Southern Cross,
2 for Scorpius,
1 for Ursa Major,
1 for Lyra,
1 for Sagittarius,
1 for Corona Australis,

Others
1 for the Great Wall (a supercluster of galaxies)
1 for Cyguns X1 (a black hole)
and 1 for the distance from our Solar System to Alpha Centauri.

That is 76 total objects tabulated.
The deep space catagory has the most number of objects voted for. 18 total.

The over all top dozen vote getters are
Saturn 21, the landslide favoritee,
Jupiter 15,
Our Moon 13,
Mars 10,
Orion 7,
Io 6,
Europa 6,
Pleiades 5,
Omega Centauri 4,
Titan 4,
Alpha Centauri 3,
Neptune 3,

damienpaul
2004-Apr-04, 02:05 PM
Sheesh you could make a dandy display in Excel for that data&#33;

Planetwatcher
2004-Apr-07, 06:34 AM
quote planetwatcher
Golly, I haven&#39;t updated this since Febuary. I think it&#39;s about time.
quote damienpaul
Sheesh you could make a dandy display in Excel for that data

Well it&#39;s one of those things that builds and builds. Like the 12 days of Christmas. Although lately this subject has been all but dead. However, it did stay pretty active for over six months, which is about 4 months longer then most active strings last.

It helps when new people join the forums, find this particular string and add their own to it. That breaths new life into it, and it stays timely as a combination of discussion, and survey.

But more then that, it&#39;s just a plain good subject. One that invites much thought and opinions, but very few arguements over those opinions.

AmateurSpaceCase
2004-Apr-08, 01:24 AM
I like Jupiter... its just awesome.

Planetwatcher
2004-Apr-08, 07:23 PM
Okay, I&#39;ll add one more for Jupiter.

Doe&#39;s anyone out there wish to add Sedna, as a new favoritte?

ebbixx
2004-Apr-08, 10:17 PM
Originally posted by Karen M.@Sep 7 2003, 02:36 AM
I have several favorties:

Saturn - wow, those rings are so awesome (and I own one too).
For personal, telescopic observation purposes only --

Saturn comes in 1st, though my daugther might vote for Jupiter (and probably will the next time we go out together and she can actually see her favorite feature, the Spot.)

At least lately I&#39;ve also gotten very fond of touring through Orion&#39;s various nebulae, though the season is near to an end for that here, sad to say. If I were in the Southern Hemisphere I&#39;d probably be voting for the Magellanic Clouds. Okay, so they&#39;re neither planets nor moons. Sue me.

Venus is terribly fascinating to think about, but not much fun to look at. Conversely, the Moon is possibly the most fun and easiest to look at and wander about in one&#39;s imagination, but doesn&#39;t do much for me otherwise (though some of the more recent speculations on its origins are beginning to heighten my interest to levels I haven&#39;t felt since the end of the Apollo program. Now I&#39;m dating myself, aren&#39;t I?)

Moving to probes and such:

Much as I&#39;m enjoying following the flood of news about Mars and its soils, rocks, boulders and "bunnies" I&#39;m really looking forward to Cassini&#39;s arrival at Saturn and seeing what new stuff comes back from that exercise.

ebbixx
2004-Apr-08, 10:40 PM
Originally posted by Dave Mitsky+Feb 16 2004, 06:14 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Dave Mitsky &#064; Feb 16 2004, 06:14 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'><!--QuoteBegin-Planetwatcher@Feb 13 2004, 07:13 PM
Dave I checked in StarfinderII, which does list the Pleades as a Messier object.
As for open cluster, perhaps I am not correctly understanding what an open cluster is.* I have had the notion that an open cluster would be a large number of stars close to each other in actual vincinity, but not numourous enough, or large enough to be considered a galaxy.


[/b][/quote]

Since Dave Mitsky addressed so much of this so well, I&#39;ll just add that (unless I&#39;m mistaken) the common definition of an open cluster is a grouping that appears visually to be close together. If you take a look at charts or illustrations of many of the Messier open clusters, they are not all that tight in many cases, and it was naturally impossible when they were first classified as open clusters to know whether they were merely coincidental arrangements of stars within a narrow arc or stars that were in fact physically near each another.

By contrast, with globular clusters, the shape is so distinctive that there has never been a need to backtrack in any way, and I&#39;m not aware of any globular cluster that is not the sames sort of formation, formed under the same (or similar) conditions, at a particular time in the evolution of our galaxy.

But designations once given have a way of sticking, sometimes with amendments and elaborations, sometimes with none.

For instance, no one I&#39;m aware of is prepared to throw out the term "planetary nebula" even though such nebulae have practically nothing to do with planets. OTOH, galaxies are no longer called nebulae, as they once, almost universally, were.

Astronomical terminology is often just about as sensible as the English language and its spelling rules (and exceptions).

Nick4
2004-Apr-09, 02:39 AM
I would have to say that Jupiter is my favorit planet becous of its masive size and its great red spot, just think about it. It is 3 times the size of earth wow 24,000 miles acros thats a big storm.
My favorit moon would have to be Titen cuz its probly the only planet in the solar system that could sustain life.

Planetwatcher
2004-Apr-10, 01:36 AM
My favorit moon would have to be Titen cuz its probly the only planet in the solar system that could sustain life. Titan will indeed be interesting to watch in months to come with all the interest mounting.

But Europa has also been hypothosied to possibley have life too. ;)

Callisto
2004-Jul-30, 02:19 PM
I was wondering what&#39;s everybody&#39;s favorite space object it could be a satelite, a planet, galaxy or whatever. My favorite is one of Jupiter&#39;s satelites called Callisto.

Littlemews
2004-Jul-30, 04:05 PM
:) my favorite object are M31, M42, NGC 3372, and M100.

Tinaa
2004-Jul-30, 04:29 PM
Check out this topic:

http://www.universetoday.com/forum/index.p...p?showtopic=595 (http://www.universetoday.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=595)

MyHeadHurts
2004-Jul-30, 06:18 PM
i would have to say my fav. object in space would be.......earth. it has a nice breathable atmosphere, butiful oceans of liquid water...not too hot not too cold. varied and abundant wildlife and plantlife. orbits a stable star at a suitable distance and has a pretty moon. what else could u want in a planet.
:ph34r:

imported_Ziggy
2004-Jul-30, 06:49 PM
Good question. Mine would have to be the Pleiades Star Cluster.

buzzlightbeer
2004-Jul-30, 11:04 PM
I vote for the Milky Way :) our own galaxy.

daniel_l_v
2004-Jul-31, 12:52 PM
Hello everyone

My favourite space object in terms of visual appeal and practical possibilities is Europa, the icy moon of Saturn. I wonder if there are oceans of water underneath the ice, as theorized by others ...

As a everyday thing from earth, i&#39;d love to witness a decent-sized object come close to earth impact, like the object that exploded above Tunguska in northern Russia many years ago, flattened hectares of trees... although, i&#39;d not want any living thing to be harmed, just the spectacle.

Cheers
Daniel V
Australia

damienpaul
2004-Jul-31, 12:57 PM
The Asteroid Belt...who knows what treasures lie therein&#33;

Tom2Mars
2004-Jul-31, 02:18 PM
Mars, with me on it.

Tom2Mars
2004-Jul-31, 02:21 PM
de Damienpaul-
The Asteroid Belt...who knows what treasures lie therein&#33;

Mars, because its convenient location to the Asteroid Belt makes it a convenient place to haul all your asteroid belt treasure to. :D

damienpaul
2004-Jul-31, 02:37 PM
This is very true&#33;&#33;&#33; okay its a deal, I&#39;ll base myself on Mars as a base for my exploration of the Asteroid Belt

Callisto
2004-Jul-31, 05:58 PM
Originally posted by daniel_l_v@Jul 31 2004, 12:52 PM

My favourite space object in terms of visual appeal and practical possibilities is Europa, the icy moon of Saturn.


Hey daniel,
I think that Europa is one of Jupiter&#39;s moons right?
Correct me if I&#39;m wrong

Callisto
2004-Jul-31, 06:01 PM
My favorite object is Callisto, one of Jupiter&#39;s moons.

StarLab
2004-Jul-31, 07:10 PM
My fave....Titan&#33; :lol:

NightFlight
2004-Aug-01, 01:58 AM
This is my first message :) Yes. I do not speake well english...But today I see that
DippyHippy has the same opinion.
But I shall say that I like very much Orion, Sirius and M31. Nebulae are my dream because that were was my birth. I was born on a a nebula...The song you know?
Have a nice Blue Moon

SpockJim
2004-Aug-01, 02:17 AM
The planets if i could see them. :(

Planetwatcher
2004-Aug-03, 02:21 PM
I&#39;m merging the favoritte space object topic which recently started with this one.
The subject matter is the same. The following postings were in favoritte space object. An update with both strings combined will be forthcoming.

Planetwatcher
2004-Aug-03, 02:26 PM
This topic string is being merged with the favoritte planet or moon topic, as the subject matter is the same.

Planetwatcher
2004-Aug-03, 02:36 PM
Okay, it didn&#39;t work the way I thought it would.
All postings are in chrological order without regard to which topic it was origionally part of. So they are all here now.

That is why you will see Tom2Mars declaring Mars twice, and the same with Calisito twice being voted for by Calistio.

The update (the largest yet) will be as soon as I can get it all done.
It will likely take up most of a page, if not start a totally new one.

Planetwatcher
2004-Aug-06, 09:06 AM
It&#39;s update time. But first I want to acknowledge, and thank Dave Mitsky for all the help he&#39;s given me on this string since I started it.

Most of you don&#39;t know how many times he&#39;s come to my rescue, after I posted incorrect information about some space object. I don&#39;t even know myself, but he has followed the string faithfully and quite oviously gleens all the details I set forth. If something is amiss, especially if I had placed something in the wrong catagory, Dave has been quick to give me the correct information.
If I&#39;m not sure about something, I can always depend on Dave to either have the right information, or get it in a hurry.

Thanks again Dave, for all you do, the vast majority of which is not seen.

Now here&#39;s the latest.


Of the planets
22 for Saturn,
18 for Jupiter,
13 for Mars,
5 for Venus,
4 for Earth,
3 for Neptune,
2 for Uranus,
1 for Mercury,
1 for Pluto,

Of the moons, and objects sharing our orbit
14 for Earths moon,
8 for Europa of Jupiter,
6 for Io of Jupiter,
6 for Titan, Saturn&#39;s largest moon,
2 for Callisto of Jupiter,
1 for all of Saturn&#39;s moons,
1 for Mimas of Saturn,
1 for Titania, largest moon of Uranus,
1 fro Triton, Neptune&#39;s largest moon,
1 for Proteaus of Neptune,
1 for Despina of Neptune,
1 for Miranda,
1 for 3753 Cruithne,
1 for 2002 AA29,
4 for Irridum flares,
1 for Northern Lights,

Of asteroids, comets, and Kupier objects
2 for Comet Hale/Bopp,
2 for Halley&#39;s Comet,
2 for the asteroid belt
2 for Varuna, (was the 2nd largest Kupier object until Quanor was discovered)
1 for Quanor, (was the 2nd largest Kupier object until the discovery of Sedna.)
1 for Pluto, Largest Kupier object. (same vote counted for planets, since Pluto
is considered both a planet & Kupier object)
1 for Ceres, (the largest asteroid in the asteroid belt)
1 for Comet Hyakutake,
1 for Comet Kohutek,
1 for Kupier object 2002 Ny401,
1 for IIIapa,
1 for Chiron,

Of stars
3 for Sirius,
3 for Alpha Centauri,
2 for Epsilon Eridani, (the parent star of Vulcan the planet Spock is from)
2 for our Sun Sol,
1 for Betelgeuse,
1 for Arcturus,
1 for Rigel,
1 for Vega,
1 for Procyon,
1 for Lalande 21185,
1 for the carbon star S Cephei (based on color - a very deep red)
1 for the Binary star - Gamma Andromedae
1 for Trinary star - Beta Monocerotis
1 for Castor, (a multiple star system)
1 for Spica,
1 for Antares,

Of Galaxies, Star clusters, Nebula, and deep space objects
6 for Pleiades, (Also know as the Seven Sisters)
6 for the Milky Way,
4 for Andromeda,
4 for Omega Centauri,
3 for Orion Nebula, (M42)
2 for Ring Nebula,(M57)
2 for Rho Ophiuchi,
2 for Emission nebula - the Eta Carinae Nebula (NGC 3372)
2 for the Large Magellanic Cloud,
2 for Galaxy M100,
1 for the Crab Nebula,
1 for Veil Nebula,
1 for Open cluster - NGC 3532
1 for the Whirlpool Galaxy,
1 for M87,
1 for Cluster 47,
1 for Eta Carina nebula,
1 for Tuc 47,

Of Constalations
10 for Orion,
2 for the Southern Cross,
2 for Scorpius,
1 for Ursa Major,
1 for Lyra,
1 for Sagittarius,
1 for Corona Australis,

Others
1 for the Great Wall (a supercluster of galaxies)
1 for Cyguns X1 (a black hole)
and 1 for the distance from our Solar System to Alpha Centauri.

That is 81 total objects tabulated.
The deep space catagory has the most number of objects voted for. 18 total.

The over all top dozen vote getters are
Saturn 22, (no longer the landslide it used to be)
Jupiter 18,
Our Moon 14,
Mars 13,
Orion 10,
Europa 8,
Io 6,
Pleiades 6,
Titan 6,
Milky Way 6,
Omega Centauri 4,
Andromeda 4,

Betelgeuse
2004-Aug-06, 07:32 PM
I&#39;ll give you my favourite of each group of celestial objects&#33;

My favourite planet is actually Jupiter - the God in my opinion and according to Greek Mythology. I find it an extremely fascinaing planet and an amazing sight in the night sky.

My favourite moon or even moons are Mars&#39; "moons" Phobos and Diemos. For some reason I&#39;m fascinated that thousands - milions of years ago they could or even must have been asteroids from the asteroid belt and it ties my mind up into a huge tangle trying to decide how exactly they got there. Secondly, their shape is extremely interesting and weird - really interesting celestial objects&#33; Thirdly their names - Greek of course and full of meaning.

Take a guess what my favourite star is ............................... RIGEL of course&#33; I have too many reasons why to state.

Favourite constealation is Orion - it&#39;s by far the most interesting in my opinion
, and Rigel is actually part of it&#33;

My favourite nebula is the veil nebula - it&#39;s amazingly beautiful in my opinion. I love neubulea - to think, stars are born there - our soolar system began in a nebula - without one, we wouldn&#39;t be here today&#33;

jsc248
2004-Aug-06, 08:22 PM
:D Hi,
I have to agree with Sir Patrick Moore and say that the Moon is by far the most beatiful object to observe. The closeness and sheer beauty of the Moon cannot be underststed. No matter how big or small your telescope or binoculars are there is always something to see.
jsc248

jitte
2004-Aug-06, 10:32 PM
Sol gets my vote.

Grizzlycomet
2004-Aug-15, 10:15 PM
My favourite object would have to be the Andromeda Galaxy. It was the first extragalactic object I saw, and it made a deep impression on me :P

Plat
2004-Aug-15, 11:32 PM
favourite planet is probably Mars

eyeinthesky77
2004-Sep-13, 01:14 PM
Jupiter&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;
Can you imagine looking under the atmosphere and seeing that HUGE ocean of liquid hydrogen&#33; Wow&#33; The ocean under the red spot would have huge waves and its just sooooooooooooo BIG&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;&#33;
This may sound strange but I have had many dreams about looking under Jupiters atmosphere........

Please don&#39;t be alarmed by my last sentence...I do dream about normal things too&#33; :D

Sirius is by far my favorite star. It&#39;s a beautiful sight in the winter sky..

tamer
2004-Sep-27, 08:07 PM
I havent read all the post, and I am not really sure that anyone would read through over 140 post to read mine, but still a good question.

Mine has to be saturn, just recently saw it with my first telescope, which isn&#39;t that nice, 70/700 refractor, and even though it was quite blurry, it was quite an amazing view.

deltaangel
2004-Sep-29, 06:33 AM
I&#39;m a Neptune girl. I love Neptune, it&#39;s an absolutely gorgeous planet. I once got an excellent view of it through a telescope in an astronomy club I was in while I lived in Washington. And I love Neptune&#39;s moon Proteus (sp). Because it&#39;s so sooty looking and really close to the planet. It&#39;s like Neptune is sheltering the moon.. I don&#39;t know. I just really like both of them.

Anyone&#39;s favorite nebulae? Mine is the Orion Nebulae. I have a slide of that one, given to me by my physics teacher two years ago. He didn&#39;t know what it was, and asked me to figure it out since he knew I was an astronomy junkie. And I did. I have a book dedicated to Nebulaes. It&#39;s huge.

mark mclellan
2004-Sep-29, 09:56 AM
Europa&#33;&#33;&#33; i cant believe i am the first one to nominate this moon, it is possibily the place most likely to find life in our solar system after our own wonderful Earth. The signs are that there is a liquid body under the fragmented layers of ice, the signs are also in favour of that liquid being water. What a place to drill and explore, imagine the possibilities...anything from at worst, a sterile poisened ocean, that would still hold wonders for geologists, to living organisms, from microbes to 200ft long jelly fish type creatures........watered planets and moons are the places to investigate for me ;) :P :rolleyes: :) :blink: :D :ph34r:

ferg.c.
2004-Sep-29, 10:31 AM
In an exceptionally beautiful extra edition of Sky and Telescope in February 2004 there is a chart showing Callisto, Ganymeade, Europa and Io and thier relative sizes.
I love this line-up on the page. They make up my favourite Quartet. It&#39;s a shame however that the never get together like that up there&#33;
I&#39;ll try to find the photorgapher for the full credit.
I like this game&#33; Duhhhh&#33;
Oh and Uranus for my planet. It&#39;s just so much wierder than the others&#33;

Callisto
2004-Oct-07, 01:31 AM
I don&#39;t know if I already answered this but my favorite object is ummm... Callisto&#33; (duh) and planet would be Jupiter. :D

have_u_ever_been_2_uranus?
2005-Aug-07, 02:51 AM
Hello everyone&#33;

I want to see what sky object is everyones favourite. Post back your favourite object and maybe a picture&#33; Thank you.

piersdad
2005-Aug-07, 05:19 AM
the space shuttle and the space station as its a man made object and spotting it is rare to get coludless nights and a sighting as well.
otherwise just staring up in the sky and thinking so any star goes as a favorite

have_u_ever_been_2_uranus?
2005-Aug-08, 06:23 AM
I go Saturn. does ice-cream count?