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View Full Version : Pendulum anomalies during today's solar eclipse



John Kierein
2001-Dec-14, 01:21 PM
Even if it's cloudy, you could try to see pendulum anomalies. Maybe balance an egg and see if falls? Call the local museum if it has a foucault pendulum. Report any results on this post! http://abcnews.go.com/sections/science/DyeHard/dye990915.html

SeanF
2001-Dec-14, 02:01 PM
Interesting, interesting . . .

But I think I might've found a wee bit o' Bad Astronomy in this article! Towards the bottoms, it says:



There’s a near total eclipse once a month when Earth, the moon and the sun are nearly aligned at the time of a new moon . . .


Now, from reading the article, I understand what they're getting at, but isn't it a little misleading to refer to a regular new moon as a "near total eclipse"?

ToSeek
2001-Dec-14, 06:11 PM
On 2001-12-14 09:01, SeanF wrote:

Now, from reading the article, I understand what they're getting at, but isn't it a little misleading to refer to a regular new moon as a "near total eclipse"?



Maybe only if you read it as "near-total."

GrapesOfWrath
2001-Dec-14, 06:34 PM
How else would you read it?

Shouldn't it be "near eclipse"?

CJSF
2001-Dec-14, 06:47 PM
On 2001-12-14 08:21, John Kierein wrote:
Even if it's cloudy, you could try to see pendulum anomalies.


I thought the pendulum anomolies seemed to occur only at the "center" of the eclipse area. I'm not sure what you would call it... the center of the eclipses ground track??? Nadir line??

CJSF

Donnie B.
2001-Dec-14, 09:03 PM
It's called the "path of totality", so I guess you want to say "the center of the path of totality".

I think it'll all turn out to be nonsense anyhow. How could the effect be concentrated only in that small area? There's no mechanism I can imagine that would do that directly, unless it's a secondary effect such as a rapid temperature change.

Hale_Bopp
2001-Dec-14, 09:23 PM
And most of these pendulums are indoors...I doubt that a rapid tempearture change would occur inside a musuem during a couple minutes of totality!

Extraordinary claims demand extraordinary proof. The story is talking about the eclipse of August 1999...two years ago. Haven't they looked at the data yet? Maybe I will dig around this weekend and see if I can find a follow up.

Rob

John Kierein
2001-Dec-15, 07:39 PM
Noever quit NASA and ran off with all the data as far I know.

John Kierein
2001-Dec-16, 11:19 AM
The mechanism is related to the Brush theory of gravity according to this.
http://www.angelfire.com/az/BIGBANGisWRONG/RadzKaga/radzkagal.htm

man on the moon
2003-Jul-14, 12:43 PM
this was an old string, but very interesting! does anyone know anymore about it? it's been four years now (yeah...the string is THAT old). it's especilaly caught my eye since we have a foucalt pendulum right here on campus. it's in the science building, stretching form the third floor down to the first. if it changed during an eclipse that would be cool!

of course there's the problem that we never have total eclipses here...at least not in the long past.

then there's also the problem with that flood last March so now it doesn't work half the time...(it's got a motor to start it and every so often give it a push. there's also a magnet in the base to keep it aligned so it doesn't make circles. without electric, it stops pretty quick!

oh yeah, bragging about my school wasn't the point. the point was does any one know anymore about this? is there research that's come out since this was posted?

russ_watters
2003-Jul-14, 02:23 PM
is there research that's come out since this was posted? Research? Bah. An economics prof who thought he saw a pendulum change direction? Uh huh. I think he was envious that the physics profs got all the chicks.

man on the moon
2003-Jul-14, 02:39 PM
that sounds reasonable enough to me russ! just thought i'd ask. if anyone else has a different opinion don't let him scare you off...