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View Full Version : Discussion: Filaments and Vortices



Fraser
2005-Aug-15, 04:41 PM
SUMMARY: In this photograph of Saturn, it's possible to see the faint filaments that circle around major storms on the planet. Scientists still don't know what these filaments are; they might be material connecting two storms together after they've split up. The could also represent wind flow in Saturn's atmosphere. Cassini took this image on July 6, 2005 when it was 2.4 million km (1.5 million miles) away from the planet.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/saturn_filaments_and_vortices.html)

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lswinford
2005-Aug-15, 07:19 PM
I thought those were mixing boundaries, like the sometimes seen rope cloud that can illustrate something like a frontal boundary between cool dry and warm moist air. Mixing boundaries are sometimes seen in things like where the Columbia River surge meets the Pacific ocean (or Amazon the Atlantic, etc.). Mixing boundaries are seen in some glaciers as lines of colored rock are dragged in from various mountain strata scraped at this point or that during the ooze of ice to its terminus.

Mixing boundaries are sometimes seen when storm cells merge or skirt each other. Out side my window at the moment there are long, low linear lines of clouds beneath two distinctly different cumulus (nimbocumulus, yeah!, we've been without substantial rain for weeks) cloud masses. In the cumulus there is substantial updraft and outflow zones. The whole set of these cumulus clouds, however, are driven together with the winds along a front. So we have, in essence a band of clouds crossing the center of the continent, but looking closer within and about that band there are individual cells or cloud masses, breaks, and conditions producing apparent boundary zones and breaks.

cran
2005-Aug-16, 01:44 AM
Originally posted by lswinford@Aug 16 2005, 03:19 AM
I thought those were mixing boundaries, like the sometimes seen rope cloud that can illustrate something like a frontal boundary between cool dry and warm moist air. Mixing boundaries are sometimes seen in things like where the Columbia River surge meets the Pacific ocean (or Amazon the Atlantic, etc.). Mixing boundaries are seen in some glaciers as lines of colored rock are dragged in from various mountain strata scraped at this point or that during the ooze of ice to its terminus.

Mixing boundaries are sometimes seen when storm cells merge or skirt each other. Out side my window at the moment there are long, low linear lines of clouds beneath two distinctly different cumulus (nimbocumulus, yeah!, we've been without substantial rain for weeks) cloud masses. In the cumulus there is substantial updraft and outflow zones. The whole set of these cumulus clouds, however, are driven together with the winds along a front. So we have, in essence a band of clouds crossing the center of the continent, but looking closer within and about that band there are individual cells or cloud masses, breaks, and conditions producing apparent boundary zones and breaks.
yeah... like he said :)

The 'graininess' of the image suggests an unusually high shutter speed (or short exposure) to compensate for the relative motions...?

Or is it due in this case to resolution loss from magnification of the digital data?

:unsure: