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VanderL
2005-Aug-20, 09:08 AM
This article (http://spaceflightnow.com/news/n0508/18swift/) reports that Swift observations of Supernova afterglows show that a supernova explosion isn't a single explosion, but explodes several times in a few minutes:


These black holes are born in massive star explosions. An initial blast obliterates the star, yet the chaotic black hole activity appears to re-energize the explosion several times in just a few minutes. This is a dramatically different view of star death, one that entails multiple explosive outbursts and not just a single bang, as previously thought.
"Stars are exploding two, three and sometimes four times in the first minutes following the initial explosion," said Prof. David Burrows of Penn State, University Park, Pa. "First comes a blast of gamma rays followed by intense pulses of X-rays. The energies involved are much greater than anyone expected," he added.

Sounds like supernovae are very poorly understood, the energy budget needs revision as well as the explosion mechanism and more importantly these things happen in only "a few minutes"?

"Things get curiouser and curiouser"

Cheers.

cran
2005-Aug-20, 12:32 PM
Excellent! :D
About time, too! B)

suttsteve
2005-Aug-20, 02:46 PM
Very interesting article. Thanks for posting it.

Fraser
2005-Aug-23, 06:10 PM
SUMMARY: NASA's Swift satellite has found brand new baby black holes, just seconds after birth. These newborn black holes are created at the heart of massive star explosions, called gamma ray bursts, and actually generate multiple blasts over the next few minutes. Nearly half of the gamma ray bursts seen by Swift follow a similar model, where there's an initial release of gamma rays, and then followed by several X-ray after-explosions as matter falling into the new black hole clogs up and releases more energy.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/swift_finds_newborn_black_holes.html)

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

cran
2005-Aug-23, 08:46 PM
wow! deja vu for the second time! :o
VanderL started this one in "Other Stories" - you see, fraser? this is what happens you nick off on some personal joyride and leave us to our own devices... :rolleyes:
You think we're gonna wait around until you can find the time to post an interesting story? (they are brilliantly interesting, aren't they?) :D
Of course not!
We are gonna jump right in and start without you!
Right guys? :)
Guys? :unsure:

I think it's fantastic! Not just because it confirms what I'd hoped was happening, but because I was here when the news came in! :D

Onya Swift!!! :D

Greg
2005-Aug-24, 06:09 AM
Very interesting, but not surprising. Generally things work out to be more complicated in real life than the overly simplistic models would suggest. Chaos and disorder are the rule more than the exception. It is very refreshing to see observations trump and rewrite longstanding dogma as is the case with the Swift findings. We will be much closer to t he truth in this field once Swift is done than we were beforehand, and this is a testimony to the value of this instrument.