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Fraser
2005-Aug-25, 06:16 PM
SUMMARY: Scientists always function on the cutting edge of their field. New discoveries, new processes, and new events highlight a challenging and sometimes rewarding career. However, scientists share this edge with others. For example, authors of science fiction novels regularly create new worlds, new physics and new societies that allow us to contemplate our own existence and guide our scientific studies. Robert Markley in his book Dying Planet captures nuances of both these fields in reviewing how research and literature about the planet Mars have been busily advancing our wonder, questioning and knowledge.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/book_review_dying_planet.html)

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cran
2005-Aug-26, 07:54 AM
Indeed... or even whether Mars was ever a &#39;habitable&#39; planet ... we hope for the best :D , even as we plan for the worst... <_<


In particular, his perception of the bickering and antagonism between scientists gives some poignant insight into the scientific process. so, why should scientists be any different to any other subset of society? <_<

Robert Markley
2005-Aug-30, 10:39 PM
Thanks to Mark Mortimer for his review of my book, but I&#39;m a bit puzzled at his comment that the study lacks a strong thesis. I&#39;ve tried to make clear throughout that the study of Mars has been tied in very complicated ways to our changing scientific understandings of terrestrial ecology. While I would love to be able to draw straightforward connections between what scientists have said about Mars and what they&#39;ve said about Earth, the story is too complex--and too important--for generalizations. Guilty as charged about some stylistic differences between chapters, but if you&#39;re going to write seriously about cross-disciplinary topics, you&#39;re going to have to negotiate a variety of different specialized languages and habits of thinking.

cran
2005-Aug-31, 01:42 AM
Hi Robert, welcome to UT,
and thanks for taking the time to reply here... :D
first, from a struggling writer, congratulations on your book; I hope it goes very well.

While I would love to be able to draw straightforward connections between what scientists have said about Mars and what they&#39;ve said about Earth, the story is too complex--and too important--for generalizations. Well put, and something we often need to remind ourselves... <_<

but if you&#39;re going to write seriously about cross-disciplinary topics, you&#39;re going to have to negotiate a variety of different specialized languages and habits of thinking. You&#39;ve been peeking at some of our discussions, haven&#39;t you? :lol:
I look forward to finding a copy, so that I can read it for myself... :D