PDA

View Full Version : Anti-matter



Quantum Complex
2005-Aug-25, 08:11 PM
That just about explains it. I know anti-matter has an opposite charge, but what makes it an opposite charge?

What are the properties of that opposite charge?

Does the opposite charge affect the way it reacts to certain things (not just matter) such as temperature or electricity? Or more correctly, how does anti-matter produce those things?

How woud you figure it's power in ways other than foot-pounds? Or is there a way to convert foot-pounds so that it fits a certain situation? like moving a 5 ton space-craft

I'll post other qestions too
:P

antoniseb
2005-Aug-25, 08:20 PM
Originally posted by Quantum Complex@Aug 25 2005, 08:11 PM
I'll post other qestions too
Hi Quantum Complex,

I can't tell from your post what you know about antimatter already, but your questions are not expressed in a terribly meaningful way... for example you ask:

What are the properties of that opposite charge?
And the properties are that each anti-particle it has an opposite charge of equal magnitude to the particle it is anti- to.

I suspect you are trying to ask "What is charge anyway, how can some particles exert force at a distance?". You don't need to be thinking about anti-matter for that question to be asked.

I would suggest googling around the web looking for information about positrons, anti-protons, etc. You'll get more complete answers than we can provide here in posts in this forum.

Quantum Complex
2005-Aug-26, 03:53 AM
Well, what I mean to ask more specifically is does that opposite charge affect the way electricity flows through anti-matter?

antoniseb
2005-Aug-26, 02:28 PM
Originally posted by Quantum Complex@Aug 26 2005, 03:53 AM
does that opposite charge affect the way electricity flows through anti-matter?
You are perhaps thinking that somewhere there is a collection of cold antimatter that includes anti-copper wires connecting an anti-lightbulb to an anti-battery. If there were such a thing the positrons would act just like our electrons. As it is, we have only made a few atoms of anti-Hydrogen, and they don't last long. The idea of even making anti-deuterium seems impossibly hard right now, and of little use.

Fortunate
2005-Sep-09, 02:03 AM
Antoniseb, since neutrinos have no charge, what is an antineutrino?

Matthew
2005-Sep-09, 10:13 AM
It is actually possible that the anti-neutrino and the neutrino are the same particles. See Wikipedia's article. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antineutrino)

swansont
2005-Sep-11, 02:46 PM
Antoniseb, since neutrinos have no charge, what is an antineutrino?

For neutrinos and antineutrinos, the spin angular momentum vector has a definite relation to the velocity vector. Neutrinos are left-handed, and antineutrinos right-handed.

jkmccrann
2005-Dec-12, 06:00 PM
For neutrinos and antineutrinos, the spin angular momentum vector has a definite relation to the velocity vector. Neutrinos are left-handed, and antineutrinos right-handed.

Does that mean that there are 7-8 times more anti-neutrinos than neutrinos? ;)