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View Full Version : Cool tumbling near earth asteroid



John Kierein
2001-Dec-20, 12:32 PM
http://www.skypub.com/news/news.shtml#Rotating1998WT24
Click on the images

GrapesOfWrath
2001-Dec-20, 02:03 PM
That AstroAlert (http://www.skypub.com/news/astroalert/astroalert.html) from Sky and Telescope looks like it might be good. I just subscribed. Has anybody else tried it?

ToSeek
2001-Dec-20, 02:45 PM
On 2001-12-20 09:03, GrapesOfWrath wrote:
That AstroAlert (http://www.skypub.com/news/astroalert/astroalert.html) from Sky and Telescope looks like it might be good. I just subscribed. Has anybody else tried it?


No, but thanks for mentioning it - I just signed up myself.

John Kierein
2001-Dec-20, 08:08 PM
NASA Cut the budget for Arecibo to do this sort of observations.
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/arecibo_cuts_011220.html

ToSeek
2001-Dec-20, 09:11 PM
On 2001-12-20 15:08, John Kierein wrote:
NASA Cut the budget for Arecibo to do this sort of observations.
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/arecibo_cuts_011220.html


Which sucks - hope they can get enough funding back to pick it up again.

Mr. X
2001-Dec-21, 05:15 AM
Arecibo is now a giant frying pan/children playground.

Heh /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

ToSeek
2001-Dec-21, 12:58 PM
On 2001-12-21 00:15, Mr. X wrote:
Arecibo is now a giant frying pan/children playground.


Well, they grow crops underneath it, so you can think of it as a sort of greenhouse.

ToSeek
2001-Dec-21, 01:23 PM
NASA has changed its mind and decided to keep funding Arecibo, at least through 2002:

http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99991727

GrapesOfWrath
2001-Dec-24, 05:11 PM
I just got my first astroalert (besides the dozen or so notifications that I was on the lists), and it was a glowing personal testimonial for a $130 camera for telescopes.

ToSeek
2001-Dec-26, 01:28 PM
On 2001-12-24 12:11, GrapesOfWrath wrote:
I just got my first astroalert (besides the dozen or so notifications that I was on the lists), and it was a glowing personal testimonial for a $130 camera for telescopes.


That has seemed to be the main topic of discussion so far. I did get a list of variable stars the other day, however.

GrapesOfWrath
2002-Feb-16, 01:03 PM
Here's an AstroAlert I just received, from Taichi Kato <tkato@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp>:

the famous long-period variable star chi Cygni (chi Cyg) is getting exceptionally bright in recent years. The maximum of chi Cyg is predicted to occur around March 10, according to the Variable Star Observers League in Japan (VSOLJ). The object is currently reported to be 3.9-4.4 mag, and seems to be still rising. Although the cataloged range of variablity is 3.3-14.2, maxima brighter than 4.0 were observed on only rare occasions in the past century. The mean brighteness of maxima is reported to be 5.2. If the brightness of the current maximum becomes brighter than 3.3, the record has a chance to be broken first time in the past 155 years! Please watch Cygnus in the morning sky, and record the variation of chi Cyg!

Burnham's says that Chi Cygni has a period of about 407 days. "The star is the brightest and most easily observed of the long-period vaiables, with the exception of the famous Mira (Omicron Ceti) and is often visible to the naked eye at maximum, reaching a brightness of 4th or 5th magnitude; the maximum recorded brightness is about 3.5. At minimum the star nearly always drops to below 12th magnitude..."

That means the swan will have an extra star in its neck--Eta Cygni is about 3.9, and Chi Cygni is 2 1/2 degrees closer to Beta Cygni, the head of the swan.