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View Full Version : was Hergé a Visionary ??



cable
2002-Dec-20, 06:33 PM
http://athom.free.fr/lune/lune3.jpg

cartoon dated 1954.
we see the suit, the visor and the stuff with antennae at their back ...

did NASA or Russians publish some drawing/sketch at that time, that inspired Hergé ?
or was he just a visionary ?

informant
2002-Dec-20, 06:38 PM
Hmm...There had been a lot of science fiction in the thirties and the forties already... Flash Gordon, Buck Rogers, etc....

Rodina
2002-Dec-20, 06:45 PM
Herges did two (I think) Tintin on the Moon comics - Destination Moon and something else, and they were pretty heavily drawn (pun intended) from the George Pal production of Robert Heinlein's Destination Moon (nee' Rocketship Galileo) a 1950 film.

(Of course, this proves the moon landing was a hoax - look, that next to him guy ain't even wearing a space suit!)

<img src=http://www.slick-net.com/space/horizons/dm81.jpg>

<img src=http://www.slick-net.com/space/horizons/dm41.jpg>



<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Rodina on 2002-12-20 13:48 ]</font>

JayUtah
2002-Dec-20, 06:53 PM
It's never easy to decide whether life imitates art, or the other way around. We can be pretty sure that in many cases form follows function. In short, there are only so many ways to design a space suit.

The bubble helmet was an innovation for Apollo. Mercury and Gemini helmets were like aircraft helmets. And ironically the LEVA was fitted over the fishbowl for lunar surface use. Now we've gone back to the aircraft helmet design. But the bubble helmet exemplifies form that follows function. You need to retain air without impeding visibility.

The "Michelin Man" legs are obviously attempts at constant-volume joints, or bellows joints. That's a very old technique for introducing flexion in a pressurized vessel. Anyone with any experience or understanding of hydraulics or pneumatics would be familiar with how to make a pressurized suit bend, and that would include tecnical artists.

People have been carrying their equipment on their backs for millennia. A spaceman needs air. He needs to communicate in a vacuum. Hence the tanks and the radio. And radios need antennas which work best when they're up high. Again, form follows function.

The artist may have indeed been a visionary but there's not a lot of leeway if you want to still convey the impression of technical plausibility. You can have the Spandex spacesuits of Wrath of Khan, but engineers will laugh at you.

Rodina
2002-Dec-20, 06:55 PM
You can have the Spandex spacesuits of Wrath of Khan, but engineers will laugh at you.

Yeah, but you'll look cool.

cable
2002-Dec-20, 08:00 PM
On 2002-12-20 13:45, Rodina wrote:
Herges did two (I think) Tintin on the Moon comics - Destination Moon and something else, and they were pretty heavily drawn (pun intended) from the George Pal production of Robert Heinlein's Destination Moon (nee' Rocketship Galileo) a 1950 film.


the following sent by Hergé to Armstrong in 1969:
<img src=http://www.le-ouaib.net/tintin/aventures/lune/message.jpg>

http://www.le-ouaib.net/tintin/aventures/lune/message.jpg



" This adventure of Tintin in two albums starts to appear in the Tintin newspaper as from March 30, 1950. Hergé wanted that this account is most realistic possible, even if it will have to be waited until 1969 so that men walk truly on the Moon. Hergé thus entered in correspondence with Doctor Bernard Heuvelmans, the author of the man among stars and documented himself. In 1948, the Doctor, in collaboration with the writer as a head of Tintin Jacques van Melkebeke, proposes in Hergé a scenario. But the history resembles rather a pastiche rather than with a true Adventure of Tintin. Hergé took of this work only some elements: the moment when the characters float in weightlessness, the scene where Haddock is irritated with its whisky which is put in ball and the scene where the Captain, drunk, leaves the rocket. Hergé however continued its collaboration with Heuvelmans for the technical elements. Thus, a model of the rocket was produced in depth."
(translation)

http://www.le-ouaib.net/tintin/aventures/voirbd.php?choix=lune

Waarthog
2002-Dec-20, 08:49 PM
People have been carrying their equipment on their backs for millennia. A spaceman needs air. He needs to communicate in a vacuum. Hence the tanks and the radio.

This could also be stated as another French author showing remarkable prescience not unlike Jules Verne's diving appratus in 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. The theory and need was known for both applications but not yet used as such.

Mainframes
2002-Dec-23, 02:23 PM
On 2002-12-20 13:45, Rodina wrote:
Herges did two (I think) Tintin on the Moon comics - Destination Moon and something else, and they were pretty heavily drawn (pun intended) from the George Pal production of Robert Heinlein's Destination Moon (nee' Rocketship Galileo) a 1950 film.



The two were two parts of a big storyline: Destination Moon was the first part and dealt with Tintin et al. at the rocket launch area with Calculus. The next part was Explorers On The Moon which was, obviously, when they were actually on the moon.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Mainframes on 2002-12-23 09:24 ]</font>