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View Full Version : Team creates 'magnetic computers'



Sticks
2005-Sep-09, 08:20 AM
Scientists are close to creating disposable computers after a breakthrough in nanotechnology

As Reported on the BBC (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/wear/4226780.stm)

publiusr
2005-Sep-09, 06:29 PM
"Mmmpf"

What's wrong Todd?

"I--erm...made the mistake--to put refridge--magnet in the pocket..of my neo-windbreaker. It reacted with the smart fabric---and now my jacket has me in a full nelson--ack--MY NECK!"

Maha Vailo
2005-Sep-12, 02:17 AM
LOL, publiusr! :D

Just exactly what would you need a disposable computer for?

And how would you keep the magnetic computer from reacting to other magnetic fields, e. g. refrigerator magnets?

- Maha Vailo

Ricimer
2005-Sep-12, 08:30 AM
By disposable I'm sure they don't mean "Well, I used my calculator for the test, then threw it away" but cheap, and easily integrated into various objects that have relatively short lifetimes. Say imbedding it into a shirt to monitor health readouts during exercise or hospital stays. It may get worn out or broken.

You could place them in containers and such to help with inventories, as they could monitor, then communicate, the amount of stuff removed.

Disposable means: really cheap, and pretty small.

Halcyon Dayz
2005-Sep-12, 01:48 PM
Great, more throw-away stuff. :naughty:

Van Rijn
2005-Sep-13, 05:56 AM
I'm not too impressed with the article. They didn't at all clearly describe what the researchers were doing and used the term "nanite," which is certainly not appropriate. The term is used in stories to refer to nanoscopic robots, alternately known as "nanobots" - but these don't exist yet. From the article, it sounded like they built logic using nanowires, but how complex? Who knows. Practical issues? Who knows. How easy is it to scale up? Who knows. How easy is it to mass produce? Well ...

Anyway, it sounds like another interesting piece of nanoscale engineering, and that is clearly the trend: Smaller and much smaller.

NEOWatcher
2005-Sep-13, 12:41 PM
I'm not too impressed with the article. They didn't at all clearly describe what the researchers were doing and used the term "nanite," which is certainly not appropriate. The term is used in stories to refer to nanoscopic robots, alternately known as "nanobots" - but these don't exist yet. From the article, it sounded like they built logic using nanowires, but how complex? Who knows. Practical issues? Who knows. How easy is it to scale up? Who knows. How easy is it to mass produce? Well ...

Anyway, it sounds like another interesting piece of nanoscale engineering, and that is clearly the trend: Smaller and much smaller.
I agree with that feeling.
Why is this technology smaller? Is it just something different? Is there some part of physics that is in control? What makes it magnetic vs electronic (how does it work)? How can being built on metal instead of silicon be a significant advantage on such a small scale?

publiusr
2005-Sep-14, 03:40 PM
If they can get better performance--I'm all for it. It doesn't seem to make as much heat--or so they say. It's worth a look.

jkmccrann
2005-Dec-22, 07:33 AM
Great, more throw-away stuff. :naughty:

In a consumerist society, creating newer and better things, so they tell us, is part of how society functions, and I'm sure you all know that, though I would have thought that mobile phones are already leading us down the path of `disposable computers' The average mobile phone sold these days exceeds the computing power of your average PC of 20 years ago.

publiusr
2005-Dec-29, 10:10 PM
It makes for good hand-me downs.