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Fraser
2005-Sep-11, 06:04 AM
SUMMARY: At least 20 people were injured and several homes were destroyed when a meteorite crashed into a village in eastern India. Several reports say that a fireball flew across the sky, and burning fragments rained down across a wide area. Officials are in the area now, assessing the damage, and trying to help recover pieces of the meteorite for further study.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/article_673.html)
What do you think about this story? post your comments below.

mpai
2006-Mar-24, 06:47 PM
I am afraid, I am unable to view the article. The link

http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/article_673.html

gives an HTTP 404 error.

Wishes

Manoj Pai

dvb
2006-Mar-25, 02:04 AM
The article can be found here (http://www.universetoday.com/am/exec/search.cgi?cat=40&start=21&perpage=20&template=index/default.html).

The BBC made an update though, and it appears that only 3 people were injured, not 20. That article can be found here (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/3149404.stm).

Melusine
2006-Mar-25, 06:43 AM
...they feel Saturday's meteor shower has added a new threat to their lives.

Scientists say, however, the risk of being killed by a falling meteorite is not worth worrying about.


With the exception of the three misfortunate people who were injured, I'm quite envious that I didn't get to see it.


Edit to add: This is a good comment about the rings of Uranus and meteorites, really (with the exception of persistent typos on some pages):


The inner rings we knew about before are made of material “of neutral color”. The possible materials are various ices (water, methane, ammonia), rock, and perhaps organic matter of the kind found in carbonaceous chondrite (http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/C/carbchon.html) meteorites. Color-wise, this is all pretty bland stuff. If you have a big lump of it, its appearance will range from white to off-white, dingy gray and eventually black, depending on the mix.
The fun part happens when you don’t have a big dirty snowball, but instead a tiny speck of dust. Light tends to scatter well from objects which are on the same scale as the light’s wavelength. This is why cigarette smoke sometimes appears blue, for example: the gunk in the air comes in particles about the same size as the wavelength of blue light. (Contrary to what some websites say, this isn’t the reason why the sky is blue. It does explain why a dusty sunset is redder, and why clouds are white in a blue sky.) A cloud of dust grains each about 700 nanometers across will scatter red light, while a cloud whose grains are half the size will scatter blue.
What I think is happening here is the scattering of light wavelengths by small particles of material which is intrinsically “bland”. That is, a bulk lump of it will not be colored, while a dust cloud will. Whether the ring material is bright or dark — say, icy or rocky — would I suppose affect the overall brightness, but the peak of the ring’s color spectrum will be determined by particle size.
Not all material seen in planetary astronomy is intrinsically colorless, of course. To pick a random example, Titan tholin is brown. And there’s a decent chance that reddish rings appear that color because they contain iron compounds (http://www.berkeley.edu/news/media/releases/2006/04/06_bluering.shtml).


The Sun is still my sentimental favorite (and there have been some strange animals on it lately :-0), but I really would like to discover a meteorite (i.e., come across one on the ground) some day. :razz:

http://www.smiliegenerator.de/s30/smilies-4312.png

Grand_Lunar
2006-Mar-28, 02:18 PM
You think this stuff only happens in movies. Well, live and learn...and look out!

five_distinct
2006-Mar-29, 03:05 PM
Great, now I have to watch for terrorists, anthrax, avian flu, and meteorites? I can only worry about so much at a time!

Melusine
2006-Mar-29, 09:05 PM
Hey, I didn't post that "I love you sign" above...I made a sign that said "Texas Welcomes Meteorites"

OK, who's screwing around with my post. :rolleyes: :lol:

Melusine
2006-Mar-29, 09:05 PM
Ok, now it doesn't say anything.

No, I can not be "gaslighted." :lol:

Melusine
2006-Mar-29, 09:37 PM
mc eats alot of pizza? :rolleyes:

five_distinct
2006-Mar-30, 02:01 AM
What the hell?

Melusine
2006-Mar-30, 02:16 AM
What the hell?
There are some myths about solar eclipses (none of which I believe, mind you), but apparently someone has spent too much time in the sun, if you know what I mean. Who that person is...well, is debatable. It could be me. You just never know. :think:

mpai
2006-Mar-31, 05:12 PM
The BBC made an update though, and it appears that only 3 people were injured, not 20. That article can be found here (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/3149404.stm).

Thanks for the link. Its true just 3 people were injured. The meteorite, now known as the Kendrapara Meteorite and its fragments were since recovered and analysed. I have seen three of the fragments of this meteorite.

Manoj

Starblade
2006-Apr-01, 10:04 PM
Thanks for the link. Its true just 3 people were injured. The meteorite, now known as the Kendrapara Meteorite and its fragments were since recovered and analysed. I have seen three of the fragments of this meteorite.

Manoj

Wow, you actually saw them?

Just a question. Howcome the meteorite doesn't belong to the people upon whose property they crashed? I'm sure if people had to bargain for the meteorite, any injury by the meteorite would be duly compensated.

mpai
2006-Apr-02, 02:08 PM
Wow, you actually saw them?

Just a question. Howcome the meteorite doesn't belong to the people upon whose property they crashed?

Well as per the Indian laws, the Geological Survey of India is the official custodian of Indian falls/finds (meteorites).

Folks injured by meteorite falls are generally compensated by the Govt. of India. I do not have much details though.

Kendrapara is the official name of this H4-5 ordinary Chondrite. Check the following link for full details on this meteorite

http://tin.er.usgs.gov/meteor/metbull.php?code=12276


Manoj