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View Full Version : Rogue Supermassive Black Hole Has No Galaxy



Fraser
2005-Sep-15, 07:44 PM
SUMMARY: The Hubble Space Telescope has discovered a supermassive black hole without a surrounding galaxy. These black holes and their galaxies are usually linked, so it's an unusual discovery. One possibility is that the host galaxy was stripped away during a collision with another galaxy. Another possibility is that the black hole is surrounded by a large amount of material, it's just dark matter, so Hubble couldn't detect it.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/hubble_homeless_blackhole.html)
What do you think about this story? post your comments below.

MilkyWaySuperNova
2005-Sep-15, 08:08 PM
First off I would just like to say that I love this site. I love learning about our universe and this is a great site for a lot of interesting information. My question is this:

From what I know black holes reside in the center of most galaxies. Also the gravitational pull of a black hole is so strong that not even light can escape it. So if this is the case how does the light of galaxies still escape if all galaxies have black holes at the center?

I've always wondered this :wall: ... I usually picture a black hole as large vacuums that devour everything close by. Does anyone have any insight into this matter? Or can anyone guide me in the right direction to the answer?

Thanks...

ziggwarth
2005-Sep-15, 09:27 PM
First off I would just like to say that I love this site. I love learning about our universe and this is a great site for a lot of interesting information. My question is this:

From what I know black holes reside in the center of most galaxies. Also the gravitational pull of a black hole is so strong that not even light can escape it. So if this is the case how does the light of galaxies still escape if all galaxies have black holes at the center?

I've always wondered this :wall: ... I usually picture a black hole as large vacuums that devour everything close by. Does anyone have any insight into this matter? Or can anyone guide me in the right direction to the answer?

Thanks...

Only the light which crosses the event horizon of the black hole is "trapped". The event horizon of a black hole (even a supermassive one) is far, far, far, far too small to prevent the light (and matter) from the whole galaxy to escape.

FYI: The event horizon of a black hole is the point where nothing can return, not even light.

Launch window
2005-Sep-16, 05:54 AM
wonderful story, and the pic looks so strange

MilkyWaySuperNova
2005-Sep-16, 05:34 PM
Thank you for clarifying that for me Ziggwarth!

Greg
2005-Sep-17, 09:19 PM
The last estimate that I heard was that the average SMBH consumes only 30 percent of the matter spiraling around it. The rest gets spit out of the accretion disc as radiation we can detect at a distance. I provided a link to an article estimating that a black hole only consumed a maximum of 25 percent of the material from a companion star that it ripped apart.

http://www.wired.com/news/technology/0,1282,62342,00.html?tw=wn_story_related

publiusr
2007-Aug-10, 08:56 PM
What a monster