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View Full Version : Asteroid Found to Match Earth's Orbit



Fraser
2005-Sep-25, 10:50 AM
SUMMARY: Astronomers have discovered an asteroid in a companion orbit to the Earth. Named 2002 AA29, this 100 metre asteroid was discovered by the linear automated sky survey project in January. Although objects have been found to share the orbits of other planets, none have ever been found for the Earth. You don't have to worry about it hitting the planet, though, as calculations of its orbit have determined that 2002 AA29 will never come closer than 4.5 million kilometres (12 times the distance from the Earth to the moon).

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/article_232.html)
What do you think about this story? post your comments below.

iron4
2005-Sep-26, 09:23 PM
This object will be a quasi-satellite of Earth in about 600 years. It was also a quasi- satellite in the past (from 550 to 600 AD)

George
2005-Sep-26, 11:17 PM
It is only fair, Jupiter has about 1800 Trojans (http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/iau/lists/JupiterTrojans.html)

George
2005-Sep-26, 11:19 PM
View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/article_232.html)
What do you think about this story? post your comments below.
The link does not work for me.

Argos
2005-Sep-26, 11:22 PM
Many links in the UTSC section donīt work.

George
2005-Sep-26, 11:28 PM
Many links in the UTSC section donīt work.
Thanks. I wondered if this was the case. I did try one and it worked, so I was hoping this was an exception.

iron4
2005-Sep-27, 12:29 AM
The link does not work for me.

Neither for me, but this is in perfect state

http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/path_earth_asteroid_companion.html?212003

agingjb
2005-Sep-27, 11:51 AM
Wasn't 3753 Cruithne the first known Earth co-orbital asteroid?

George
2005-Sep-27, 12:57 PM
Good question. Although Cruthne is in an elliptical orbit and inclined to our orbital plane it is still considered co-orbital, apparently. However it and two others - 1998 UP1 and 2000PH5, are not Trojan bodies at either L4 or L5 Lagrange points. I thought L4 and L5 points were about 1 a.u. from us so how can AA29 get so close. I hope someone will clear this up for us.

MstrPBK
2006-Jul-19, 04:33 PM
New meneber here ... with odd question.

Does anyone know the apparoximate orbital time for 2002 AA29? All I am seeing at any site is the two orbital "cycle times" (2006 year Co-orbital [calculated], and 50 year earth orbitial). Or is this object so irradic that no average orbital time can be computed for it?

antoniseb
2006-Jul-19, 04:43 PM
Hi MstrPBK, welcome to the BAUT forum.

This page does a good job of telling what is known.
http://www.astro.uwo.ca/~wiegert/AA29/AA29.html

Basically, it has about the same orbital period as ours, but that gets nudged up and down by a percent or two with each Earth interaction.

tony873004
2006-Jul-19, 06:04 PM
Basically, it has about the same orbital period as ours, but that gets nudged up and down by a percent or two with each Earth interaction.
Your description is right on the money.

http://orbitsimulator.com/BA/P2002AA29.GIF

MstrPBK
2006-Jul-20, 08:09 AM
Somehow my mind wrapped around this "sideways". Your information helped me unravel a number of misunderstandings I had about it (won't list them all here). I understand the unusual nature of this asteroid better.

Thanks again for the enlightenment and kind welcome. You will all see me around here over the coming months asking other questions I am sure.

MstrPBK
St. Paul, MN



Hi MstrPBK, welcome to the BAUT forum.

This page does a good job of telling what is known.
http://www.astro.uwo.ca/~wiegert/AA29/AA29.html

Basically, it has about the same orbital period as ours, but that gets nudged up and down by a percent or two with each Earth interaction.