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View Full Version : My big regrets about Stargate up to season 8



Glom
2005-Sep-25, 10:58 PM
Now it's time to review the series in a critical manner.

The role of the stargates
I feel they've been pushed to the side a bit. In the beginning, they were a source of worship for the enslaved peoples of the galaxy. In 'Children of the Gods', Daniel observes the area around the stargate of Chulak and concludes it is a place of worship. By the end, the stargates are just a tool. They begin to lose some of the mythological significance they had in the beginning.

The use of mythology
This has also died a bit. In the beginning, Daniel observed that the Goa'uld were living Egyptian mythology. By the end, many of the details of the mythology and the way that the myths manifested themselves had been replaced by simply picking a vaguely suitable name and leaving it there. We don't get the feeling of the galaxy living any kind of mythology.

The state of technology
Ships have become too fast and too convenient. The stargates were important early on because travelling by ship was too difficult and too lengthy. When you wanted to launch a huge attack, it was fine, but for day to day travel, it is kind of like sending 777 down to the corner shops. But in 'Prodigy', Mot insisted on coming by ship for no good reason. Before his defeat at Earth, I don't recall ever seeing Anubis use a stargate. There's too much running around on ships. It undermines the stargates. The excessive use of cloaking devices and shields is also not too good.

The consistency of chronology
They don't really have it worked out right. As one example, we have a human society that achieves technological advancement and creates the android Reese, who creates the Replicators. But, it is established that it is the Replicators, which are the reason the Asgard don't intervene to help the humans enslaved by the Goa'uld. How did this human society get anywhere without the Goa'uld? When the Goa'uld could get to Earth through whichever get is also inconsistent.

captain swoop
2005-Sep-26, 11:49 AM
Just watching 8 on Ch 4, missed most of 7

Seems they are just going through the motions, it's lost its spark!

No Gen Hammond? O'Neil a General and in charge? Bleargh!

Glom
2005-Sep-26, 11:55 AM
Seems they are just going through the motions, it's lost its spark!

I have to agree with that. It's rather intangible, but I do feel it is missing something.

Humphrey
2005-Sep-26, 06:55 PM
I feel that they have done it right this newest season with the Ori, the new general, and new SG1 leader. They have prety much gone back to their roots.

TrAI
2005-Sep-26, 09:06 PM
Now it's time to review the series in a critical manner.

...

The consistency of chronology
They don't really have it worked out right. As one example, we have a human society that achieves technological advancement and creates the android Reese, who creates the Replicators. But, it is established that it is the Replicators, which are the reason the Asgard don't intervene to help the humans enslaved by the Goa'uld. How did this human society get anywhere without the Goa'uld? When the Goa'uld could get to Earth through whichever get is also inconsistent.

Hmmm... Well, We didn't get to know much about the civilization that created Reese, but there seems to be quite a few worlds out there inhabited by humans but that has little dealings with the Goa'uld, I have a feeling that the Ancients, and perhaps the Asgard may have had a finger in that, so many worlds may have already been settled by Humans long before the Goa'uld came to power. Technology is, in my opinion, not a linear thing, that means that things does not have to evolve in the same pattern as here on earth, but more importantly to this subject, advancement does not have to be linear in relation to time, as a people get more advanced, they may develop technologies at an accelerated pace. So someone that is called "thousands of years ahead", may in fact not be so.

Some times they will however create the tools for their own destruction, The story of the replicators was quite sad, though, Reese seemed very nice, but it did not really understand or predict the results of its actions. Its toys proved to be a most successful form of life, efficient, adaptable and probably one of the most terrific creatures we have seen so far in the Star Gate universe, sure the Goa'uld and Wraith can be a little scary, but seeing a flood of replicators flowing down the hallways, replicating by feeding on what ever is around, well, they are terrifying, they are probably still around, replicating in the shadows, learning and adapting, growing stronger for the next time... Though taking humanlike form and personalities was probably a bad move...

One thing I really do not like is the concept of “more evolved humans” the series use occasionally, that the destiny of life is to ascend and all that. I wonder what the ascended do at all, the ones we know anything about seem to be the more rogue ones. For some reason I get a kind of sad feeling about the ascended, kind of like peoples that are so common in fantasy, the old, advanced people, a great civilization, with the knowledge and power to bend the very universe to their wills, but still they faded, save for a few that still linger, a ghost of a once powerful people, and though they are still extremely powerful, they are to caught up in the past to find a new place in reality(except the ones that turn to the “dark side”, of course, but they are no less tragic, and probably not much happier). They see the new children of world(s) and long to not know all they do about reality, that there still was some challenges to face. My bet is that the ascended are not any happier than the flesh-bound, and for all their power and knowledge, their existence is probably not so superior at all.

nomuse
2005-Sep-27, 07:49 AM
What I miss is the role of language. In the movie, lanquage and linguistics was at the heart; we had the Terrans working at developing friendship and trust dispite the language barrier, we had the entire expedition dependent on the interpretation of a few symbols, and we had Ra trying to control knowledge of history through supression of writing.

In some of the series episodes there was still some playfullness with language. Jackson and the Unas, for instance. But more and more, everyone simply speaks English and that's all there is to it.

This might be the smarter move -- going off with accents or unusual words only brings into visibility the problem of cultures a million years divided managing to share a language (c.f. the Atlantis pilot). It may be easier to suspend disbelief when the matter is never brought up.

And with an hour to develop a story, you can hardly teach a hundred alien words and an alien grammar, too.