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View Full Version : 10th Planet has a Moon



Fraser
2005-Oct-03, 06:17 PM
SUMMARY: The newly discovered 10th planet - which the discoverers have dubbed "Xena" - appears to have a moon of its own. Nicknamed "Gabrielle", this moon is 100 times fainter than Xena, and seems to orbit the planet once every couple of weeks. It's estimated to be 1/10th the size of Xena, so approximately 250 km (155 miles) across. The powerful Hubble Space Telescope will be turning its gaze on the pair in November/December, and should reveal even more details.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/10th_planet_has_moon.html)
What do you think about this story? post your comments below.

Hurricane
2005-Oct-03, 07:10 PM
As the IAU drags its feet on the naming of "the girls" (and defining just what the heck "planet" means) society is inching ever closer to naming/defining Planet Xena and its moon, Gabrielle, itself! At first, I favored a more traditional approach, but they're starting to grow on me. By the time the IAU acts ol' Xena will orbit a few years! lol

suitti
2005-Oct-03, 09:24 PM
One of the other articles on this topic suggested that Xena and Gabrielle have been submitted to the IAU as names. Hopefully, this is just some journalists misinterpretation. In any event, I hope that the IAU isn't dumb enough to use these names.

One of the more interesting parts of this news is that the Kecks are doing interferometry, and adaptive optics with a laser guide star. I'd only heard of one or the other but not both to date. So, is it interferometry at any wavelength, or just infrared?

goddardrocketry
2005-Oct-03, 11:34 PM
When was Xena discovered? Why hasn't the media picked up on this more? You'd think discovering a 10th planet would be extreme news. Was I at Scout camp when this thing got discovered?

Wolverine
2005-Oct-03, 11:46 PM
When was Xena discovered? Why hasn't the media picked up on this more? You'd think discovering a 10th planet would be extreme news. Was I at Scout camp when this thing got discovered?

As noted here (http://skyandtelescope.com/news/article_1560_1.asp):


Discoverers Michael E. Brown (Caltech), Chad Trujillo (Gemini Observatory), and David Rabinowitz (Yale University) first imaged the object on October 21, 2003, but didn't see it move in the sky until they reimaged the same area 15 months later, on January 8, 2005.

Brown's page (http://www.gps.caltech.edu/%7Embrown/planetlila/index.html) contains a great deal more info, and if you're interested you can listen to him mention all the particulars as well as the media reaction in this interview (http://planetary.org/audio/pr20050815.html).

cran
2005-Oct-04, 03:41 AM
When was Xena discovered? Why hasn't the media picked up on this more? You'd think discovering a 10th planet would be extreme news. Was I at Scout camp when this thing got discovered?

It was big news... there was quite a debate going on about which new KBO should be given 'planet' status, if any... and this debate in the media was reflected in a number of threads going on in UT (where we gave 'Xena' the name 'Rupert')... now Rupert (Xena) has a moon!

Onya Rupert! :dance:

parallaxicality
2005-Oct-04, 06:59 AM
I wish someone could pin this, but Xena and Gabrielle are not going to be these "planets"' official names. They're just nicknames; the real names have been submitted to the IAU and have yet to be approved.

hal5000
2005-Oct-04, 07:05 AM
is it too early to find out what this 10th 'planet' orbit is like??

is it similar 2 pluto?

01101001
2005-Oct-04, 07:33 AM
is it too early to find out what this 10th 'planet' orbit is like?
Its orbit is depicted at Mike Brown's "10th Planet" site (http://www.gps.caltech.edu/~mbrown/planetlila/index.html).

Hurricane
2005-Oct-04, 01:14 PM
I wish someone could pin this, but Xena and Gabrielle are not going to be these "planets"' official names. They're just nicknames; the real names have been submitted to the IAU and have yet to be approved.

I understand that, but my point was that if the IAU drags its feet long enough the nicknames might stick with the public.

Greg
2005-Oct-05, 03:31 AM
This is good news. Having this little moon around it will help astronomers get it to cough up some of its secrets despite being so far away. I do not mind naming the planet xena if it holds to the tradition of planet nomenclature that has come before it. I think naming the moon Gabrielle is an obvious reference to a trivial television comedy which is not appropriate for a sceintific discovery of this magnitude. On the other hand it does serve to generate a common interest in the find, so it is quite clever of Dr. Brown to do this. I just hope these are not the names he submitted to the IAU.

hamops
2005-Oct-05, 12:07 PM
Mike Brown from Caltech had announced discovery of 2003 ub313's (Xena's) moon Gabrielle, which is aprox. 10 times closer to Xena than our Moon to Earth. Discovery was done on 10th sept. 2005 on Keck telescope,...
When we suppose ,that Xena is nearly 0.003 of mass of Earth, so orbital period of Gabrielle should be around 16 days. They (Brown,..) said, that they need time for to measure orbital time of Gabrielle, but I think that 3 to 4 days for measurements (1/4 of orbit) are enough, so why don't we have these data yet?!
Strange is, that they said, that orbital period of Gabrielle would be announced in January 2006, why, when 4 days-1/4 of orbit are enough?

Look at orbits of Xeny, Sedny, Pluto, 2003EL61, 2004DW, 2005FY9 and on another KBO,... objects behind Neptune.
All of them have shifted paths approximatelly 10AU oposit supposed focuses in placing of Sun.
These shifts could be done /-response to/ by arriving PX with mass 25 Jupiters, on orbit with a=150AU
It is amusing, that shifts are on line Sun-Pluto, or it is actually direction Sgt-Taurus,Orion, what is direction of supposed comming PX.
See web pages of Mike Brown
http://www.gps.caltech.edu/~mbrown/planetlila/index.html
where you can find, compare it.
what could PX be, when it is so close but unvisible to now?
Colapsar or micro black hole, or T dwarf inside of dark cloud of gasses similar to that body what was discovered yesterday!
RNDr. Pavel Smutny

Wolverine
2005-Oct-05, 12:19 PM
http://www.bautforum.com/images/icons/icon4.gif hamops, you were warned not to engage in this sort of behavior.

Your account has been terminated.

pumpkinpie
2005-Oct-05, 01:48 PM
When was Xena discovered? Why hasn't the media picked up on this more? You'd think discovering a 10th planet would be extreme news. Was I at Scout camp when this thing got discovered?

Even though subsequent posters have anwered your question literally and pointed out when it was discovered, I think you were getting at "when was this announced?" It was announced Friday July 29, and it was *very much* in the media for at least a couple weeks after that. Well, I was closely following it on the internet, so it was very prevalent to me!

So, if you were at scout camp the end of July/beginning of August, it's understandable that you missed it! :D

pumpkinpie
2005-Oct-05, 01:51 PM
I understand that, but my point was that if the IAU drags its feet long enough the nicknames might stick with the public.

I agree, Hurricane. Even with as much as Brown and co emphasize that "Xena" and "Gabrielle" are only nicknames, the fact that the keep using them is what people are going to remember. Let's have the real names!

Jakenorrish
2005-Oct-05, 03:25 PM
Well I'm with Cran. In honour of the great Douglas Adams the 'Kuiper Belt planet' should be called Rupert!

parallaxicality
2005-Oct-05, 04:07 PM
The funny thing is, his prophecy seems to have come true. The planet has a nice, godly real name, whatever it is, but the silly, banal nickname will be the one everyone remembers.

I wonder if Xena has Grebulons on it. Think they watch Xena?