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Argos
2005-Oct-05, 02:22 PM
From the CNN site (http://www.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europe/10/04/eui.survey/index.html)


Vancouver is the world's most desirable place to live, according to a new survey, while Papua New Guinea's Port Moresby is at the other end of the scale.

Iīd vote for Curitiba, Brazil.

TriangleMan
2005-Oct-05, 02:39 PM
Some of us on the JREF board were discussing this and the parameters they used to determine "livability" may be questionnable, for example:

Cleveland and Pittsburgh had the highest American scores.
Cleaveland and Pittsburgh? :eh:

When I have some time I'll try to read the actual study to see how they weighted certain factors.

Fraser
2005-Oct-05, 03:12 PM
D'oh... and I just moved away from Vancouver. Well, I think I moved somewhere even better, and I'm still only a few hours away from the Big City so it's all good.

Reina
2005-Oct-05, 03:15 PM
Some of us on the JREF board were discussing this and the parameters they used to determine "livability" may be questionnable, for example:

Cleaveland and Pittsburgh? :eh:

When I have some time I'll try to read the actual study to see how they weighted certain factors.


ewwwwwww cleveland???

Jakenorrish
2005-Oct-05, 03:19 PM
Cardiff, Wales, Uk, without a doubt!

Candy
2005-Oct-05, 03:21 PM
Cleveland and Pittsburgh? :eh:
http://www.cosgan.de/images/smilie/verschiedene/a015.gif Perhaps, I need to visit these cities again.

Saluki
2005-Oct-05, 03:33 PM
I can't imagine wanting to live in any big city. It is nice to have a city's resources within a reasonable drive, but I would never put up with all the hassles of living in one.

mid
2005-Oct-05, 03:41 PM
I'd imagine that they asked people whether living in a given city was a good thing or not. You're bound to skew towards ones with large populations, since even taking out those that hate where they live, you're still going to be left with more who like it.

Sticks
2005-Oct-05, 03:46 PM
I will just let the facts speak for themselves

As reported on the BBC website (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/2270840.stm)

:razz:

ToSeek
2005-Oct-05, 03:59 PM
I decided a long time ago that the best place to live would be a university town within day-trip distance of a major metropolitan area.

Eta C
2005-Oct-05, 04:06 PM
Ah, Champaign-Urbana IL fits the description. Home to the U. of Illinois, 2 hours to Chicago, about 3 to St. Louis. I've often thought I'd like to go back there when I retire and leave the Heart of Darkness.

Taks
2005-Oct-05, 04:06 PM
like boulder, CO... i'd love it there except for the politics.

i've been to vancouver recently and while it may be a nice city (in terms of cities), i'd never live there. any city of that size is too crowded for me. my goal is acreage. you can't get acreage in vancouver.

columbia, MO, is regularly regarded as one of the best places in the country (US) to live. it won't rate high on polls such as normally seen in the media because it is small (under 100k). two hours from st. louis and kansas city, beautiful rolling hills right along the missouri river. less than an hour from the lake of the ozarks. booming economy and, the best part, you can get land, cheap. of course the colleges are there, about 40k students between all of them. unfortunately, it is too far from the mountains from me.

so i chose colorado springs. :)

taks

pghnative
2005-Oct-05, 04:07 PM
Some of us on the JREF board were discussing this and the parameters they used to determine "livability" may be questionnable, for example:

Cleveland and Pittsburgh had the highest American scores.
Cleaveland and Pittsburgh? :eh:

'Dems fightin words.

Moose
2005-Oct-05, 04:08 PM
ToSeek, funny you should mention that. My view is remarkably similar in that my ideal specific place is also a university town (Halifax), except for that whole "major metropolitan area" within a day's drive thing. ;)

Never was a fan of big cities. Seems to me 200,000 neighbors should be plenty of company for anyone.

TriangleMan
2005-Oct-05, 04:17 PM
From EIU's website:

The survey takes over 40 factors into consideration which are weighted across five different categories: Stability; Healthcare; Culture & Environment; Education; and Infrastructure. Across the survey a mixture of quantitative and qualitative data are used, which are combined to give an overall Quality of Life Index rating.
Many of these appear to be factors that could be consistent on a national level rather than city-wide level. With Stability, Healthcare, and Education being primary categories any Canadian city is likely to score well. Any US city would receive lower marks in Stability (terrorism threats, etc.) and Health Care if the EIU prefers the Canadian system compared to the US one.

I love Vancouver, I used to live there and wouldn't mind doing so again someday, but I'm not taking the results of this survey too seriously.

the_shaggy_one
2005-Oct-05, 04:32 PM
I find the Minneapolis-St. Paul area quite livable, except between late november and march - then it becomes Paradise. :D

Saluki
2005-Oct-05, 04:33 PM
Ah, Champaign-Urbana IL fits the description. Home to the U. of Illinois, 2 hours to Chicago, about 3 to St. Louis. I've often thought I'd like to go back there when I retire and leave the Heart of Darkness.

Have you ever been to Carbondale? It has most of the benefits of Champaign, but much better scenery. It is farther from Chicago, but I can't imagine what I would need from Chicago that I can't get in St Louis.

Candy
2005-Oct-05, 04:34 PM
ToSeek, funny you should mention that. My view is remarkably similar in that my ideal specific place is also a university town (Halifax), except for that whole "major metropolitan area" within a day's drive thing. ;)

Never was a fan of big cities. Seems to me 200,000 neighbors should be plenty of company for anyone.
Ahhh, Halifax! The selfless acts performed by local people on 9/11 still take my breath away ‘til this day. :)

Fraser
2005-Oct-05, 04:39 PM
The main reason to live in a big city is for the work. There are only so many places a person can be a manager in a software company. So if you have to work in a place like that, where do you want to live.

I agree, though, we've got 50,000 people living here in the Comox Valley. They're smart, well educated, and reasonably cosmopolitan. It just took one night of trivia competition at an MS Society fundraiser to put me in my place. If you think people in small towns are backwards... you should find out for yourself.

Community is something that just happens in a smaller town, while you have to put work building and maintaining it in a larger city. And for me, community is everything - that's why I love this forum. :-)

fossilnut2
2005-Oct-05, 04:45 PM
ToSeek, funny you should mention that. My view is remarkably similar in that my ideal specific place is also a university town (Halifax), except for that whole "major metropolitan area" within a day's drive thing. ;)

Never was a fan of big cities. Seems to me 200,000 neighbors should be plenty of company for anyone.

Toronto was in the top ranking (as was my city of Calgary).

Ha! Ha! I find Toronto the last place in Canada I'd want to live. I used to live in Halifax and agree it is a much more enjoyable place to live than the big T. The rankings equate people with robots...the best place to be serviced and find new parts.

Gillianren
2005-Oct-05, 05:34 PM
I decided a long time ago that the best place to live would be a university town within day-trip distance of a major metropolitan area.

read my post about Olympia yet? we're only about two hours from Seattle and about four (depending on driver) from Portland, OR, which are both pretty cool for major metropolitan areas.

ToSeek
2005-Oct-05, 05:37 PM
Have you ever been to Carbondale? It has most of the benefits of Champaign, but much better scenery. It is farther from Chicago, but I can't imagine what I would need from Chicago that I can't get in St Louis.

I actually lived in Carbondale for over two years and was pretty happy there. If I'd thought my wife and I could have gotten appropriate jobs in the area, we might have considered staying.

ToSeek
2005-Oct-05, 05:38 PM
read my post about Olympia yet? we're only about two hours from Seattle and about four (depending on driver) from Portland, OR, which are both pretty cool for major metropolitan areas.

Unfortunately (in some respects), I also need to live where rocket scientists are in demand. ;)

Saluki
2005-Oct-05, 05:53 PM
I actually lived in Carbondale for over two years and was pretty happy there. If I'd thought my wife and I could have gotten appropriate jobs in the area, we might have considered staying.

I agree completely. It is a great place to live, but employment opportunities are limited if you are not in education or health care.

Gillianren
2005-Oct-05, 06:35 PM
Unfortunately (in some respects), I also need to live where rocket scientists are in demand. ;)

right. all we have around here are airplane engineers, and that's kind of unstable these days. (have I mentioned how much I love being on a board where the response to "you guys aren't rocket scientists" is "well, actually . . . .")

ToSeek
2005-Oct-05, 06:48 PM
right. all we have around here are airplane engineers, and that's kind of unstable these days. (have I mentioned how much I love being on a board where the response to "you guys aren't rocket scientists" is "well, actually . . . .")

I can do rocket science. It's brain surgery I have a problem with. ;)

Candy
2005-Oct-05, 06:53 PM
I can do rocket science. It's brain surgery I have a problem with. ;)
So rocket surgery is out of the question?

Swift
2005-Oct-05, 07:03 PM
Originally Posted by TriangleMan
Some of us on the JREF board were discussing this and the parameters they used to determine "livability" may be questionnable, for example:

Quote:
Cleveland and Pittsburgh had the highest American scores.


Cleaveland and Pittsburgh?


ewwwwwww cleveland???
That's fine, you folks laugh all you like at Cleveland. Please, please do not move here. Go to Florida or LA or Seattle and help them with their increasing sprawl. We have enough folks, our housing prices are not inflated, we have plenty of elbow room, a lovely lake with plenty of drinking water, and no huricanes.

;)

Andromeda should have strong feelings about this, she's from Pittsburgh and goes to school in Cleveland.

TriangleMan
2005-Oct-05, 07:39 PM
So Swift, do you consider Cleaveland the most liveable (large) city in the US?

Candy
2005-Oct-05, 07:49 PM
So Swift, do you consider Cleveland the most liveable (large) city in the US?
Swift loves his home city like I love my city of birth, Lafayette, Indiana (Tippecanoe County).

TriangleMan - I have corrected your spelling twice - it's Cleveland!

pghnative
2005-Oct-05, 07:49 PM
Where's Cleaveland?

BTW, those of us from Pittsburgh like to take potshots and Cleveland (and vice versa, no doubt), but my guess it that the cities are similar. Pittsburgh is eminently liveable. Large enough to have major sports, arts, and other attractions but small enough that neither house prices nor traffic woes are exorbitant.

There is that small matter of finding a job in the chemical industry..... oh well.

Swift
2005-Oct-06, 03:24 AM
So Swift, do you consider Cleaveland the most liveable (large) city in the US?
I don't particularly consider it the most liveable (not even completely sure what that means) or the best, but I think it is a great place to live and a lot better than most people think.
(for those of you outside of the US, Cleveland is generally everyones city to make fun of)

I was born and raised in New York City and lived for extended periods of time (at least months) in Providence, Baton Rouge, New Orleans, and Cleveland (as well as Paris, France) and have visited many other cities. I think it compares very favorable with many of those, though it is different.

As pghnative points out, Cleveland and Pittsburgh are very similar cities, big enough to have at least some of the big city stuff (museums, sports, theatre, etc.), though not like NY or Paris, but are small enough that you can live in the center of the city and be a 30 minute drive from farms, and are "unpopular" enough that the cost of living is very reasonable.

I also like this part of the US because I like seasons (I even like winter), but other than the occassional blizzard, minor earthquake, or tornado, don't get the big natural disasters that other parts of the US are prone to.

I also agree with pghnative that Cleveland and Pittsburgh like to make fun of each other, not only because of their opposing football teams, but because they are so much alike.

captain swoop
2005-Oct-06, 08:51 AM
If you are tired of London you are tired of Life.

As someone once wrote (Dr Johnson?)

EvilBob
2005-Oct-06, 09:06 AM
That's fine, you folks laugh all you like at Cleveland. Please, please do not move here. Go to Florida or LA or Seattle and help them with their increasing sprawl. We have enough folks, our housing prices are not inflated, we have plenty of elbow room, a lovely lake with plenty of drinking water, and no huricanes.

;)

Andromeda should have strong feelings about this, she's from Pittsburgh and goes to school in Cleveland.
Hey guys, remember: the Heart of Rock & Roll (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B0000071L0/qid=1128589461/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/102-8805377-5941749?v=glance&s=music) is in Cleveland...

EvilBob
2005-Oct-06, 09:06 AM
If you are tired of London you are tired of Life.

As someone once wrote (Dr Johnson?)
Wasn't that Ursa Minor Beta?

Lianachan
2005-Oct-06, 09:14 AM
Wasn't that Ursa Minor Beta?

Indeed. It certainly doesn't sound like the London I know only too well, and am forced to visit only too often.

jumbo
2005-Oct-06, 09:20 AM
Cardiff, Wales, Uk, without a doubt!
I kinda like Cardiff too!
Theres plenty going for it and its improving all the time. it big enough to have some great pubs clubs and stuff. Also a great stadium and (importantly for me) a Hockey team. It also boasts many fine parks. i love being able to be in town then a minute later be in the middle of a huge park surrounded by greenery and if i wish i can walk for miles without the bhustle and bustle of the town. Despite this its small enough that its not wildly overcrowded and doesnt feel oppressive like some larger cities.

The bay is pretty nice nowadays. Spent a lovely sunday afternoon not long ago in the sun having ice cream sat on a balcony thing above the water taxis watching the world go by after checking out the market by the millenium stadium and walking the taff trail to the bay.

NEOWatcher
2005-Oct-06, 11:55 AM
Swift has some good points, but I would like to see the factors they used. While I believe Cleveland is a great place to live, I don't believe Cleveland has anything above some cities in the US.
And pghnative is right, the job market seems to be in the dumper. Is it that bad all over?
Similar to Pittsburgh? maybe in many respects, but they don't seem to have any straight 2way streets. On the other hand, we don't have many smooth ones.

wyvernfink
2005-Oct-06, 12:37 PM
Hi everyone!

I'm a long time lurker, and may have even posted once or twice a long time ago (BA forum, maybe two software changes ago).

I moved to Cleveland (Berea) two years ago, and I find the city to be very nice, although not without its problems.

On the good side, Cleveland has a stronger cultural component than I expected. It has great museums, a world-class orchestra - more than I had expected for a city of its size. The Cleveland Metroparks (i.e. "emerald necklace") is one of the best park systems I've seen, although I'm biased in that I love long-distance inline skating (which the parks are perfect for). As mentioned by Swift, the cost of living here is reasonable as well (especially property values).

The bad things about Cleveland are the economy and job situation (it's still largely an industrial city in a time of further-decreasing industry), the poverty issue (it had the highest poverty rate in the U.S. last year), and the physical size of the city relative to its population. Cleveland (and its surrounding suburbs) is widely spread out, resulting in a population density too low to support a wide-reaching public transportation system (now, Cleveland does have busses and a few trains, but the system just doesn't work as well as other cities). Also, Cleveland has had an ongoing problem of "brain drain", where young professionals are leaving the city (I'm one of only a few younger people I've met who have actually moved to Cleveland).

Overall, I think Cleveland is a good place to live, and I have to say I've been quite happy here.

Sticks
2005-Oct-06, 01:12 PM
At least our city had one of its streets voted to be the best :dance:

Something we have that US towns might not have


History :razz:

TriangleMan
2005-Oct-06, 03:04 PM
Welcome to the board wyvernfink! :)


Also, Cleveland has had an ongoing problem of "brain drain", where young professionals are leaving the city (I'm one of only a few younger people I've met who have actually moved to Cleveland).
Which seems to contradict the liveability of the city, but then without a detailed understanding of what factors EIU felt were important for their study it is difficult to agree or disagree with their assessment, especially in comparing to other US cities. Unfortunately you have to register with EIU to get the full document and I think they charge for registration.

Moseley
2005-Oct-06, 03:27 PM
Not been to most of previous suggested cities but my favourite is Christchurch in New Zealand's south island - plenty of space, lovely climate, not too large (~340k), 10 miles to coast, 50 to mountains. FULL of Kiwis.

Maksutov
2005-Oct-06, 03:33 PM
[edit] FULL of Kiwis.Birds or people?

Or both?

Argos
2005-Oct-06, 03:37 PM
or the fruit?

Tranquility
2005-Oct-06, 04:41 PM
Bah, Hurghada or Alexandria, Egypt.

Big Brother Dunk
2005-Oct-07, 02:54 AM
It's no surprise that Vancouver is at the top of the list. It's a great city.


ToSeek, funny you should mention that. My view is remarkably similar in that my ideal specific place is also a university town (Halifax), except for that whole "major metropolitan area" within a day's drive thing. ;)

Never was a fan of big cities. Seems to me 200,000 neighbors should be plenty of company for anyone.Very similar situation to Saskatoon, SK.

Mars
2005-Oct-07, 03:10 AM
Bah, Hurghada or Alexandria, Egypt.


Been to Alexandria. Nice place, the government of the country makes it a place I wouldn't want to live in though.

Laminal Cockroach
2005-Oct-07, 04:43 PM
i actually well liked malta when i went there a couple of weeks ago, but i love it here in london, actually calcutta is a great place to live

Gillianren
2005-Oct-07, 06:16 PM
if you're not poor. I would imagine the standard of living for the poor pretty much keeps Calcutta from most people's great city lists.

Reina
2005-Oct-07, 06:34 PM
ToSeek, funny you should mention that. My view is remarkably similar in that my ideal specific place is also a university town (Halifax), except for that whole "major metropolitan area" within a day's drive thing. ;)

Never was a fan of big cities. Seems to me 200,000 neighbors should be plenty of company for anyone.

I have about 8 Million neighbors, thats cozy enough for me! ;-)

A.DIM
2005-Oct-07, 07:09 PM
I purposely removed myself from city life and plan never to return.

I'd had enough.

I now live in a western KY county with fewer than 2500 residents, but am 2-3 hours from 4-5 major metro midwest areas.

The darkest of skies here...

jimmy
2005-Oct-07, 11:29 PM
From the CNN site (http://www.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europe/10/04/eui.survey/index.html)



Iīd vote for Curitiba, Brazil.


I'd vote for Salvador, Brazil. Have you ever been to Bahia? Nice!

Laminal Cockroach
2005-Oct-07, 11:55 PM
if you're not poor. I would imagine the standard of living for the poor pretty much keeps Calcutta from most people's great city lists.
hey im from calcutta please dont call it a poor mans place that is offensive It is avery peaceful place to live in to find a meaning of life, Money isnt the most important thing there, that is why it is good.... Most people arent exactly rich like you. :mad:

AGN Fuel
2005-Oct-08, 11:41 AM
Gotta put in a vote for Sydney.

Temperatures regularly reached the 20's (celsius, not fahrenheit) during the winter just gone; some of the finest surfing beaches in the world; great restaurants & great nightlife; wilderness only a few hours drive away for the outdoor types, or snow fields 4 hours easy drive away; fabulous harbour and waterways and some of the friendliest people on the planet.

No earthquakes, hurricanes or volcanos. If they could get the trains to run on time, it would be paradise!

Argos
2005-Oct-08, 12:01 PM
I'd vote for Salvador, Brazil. Have you ever been to Bahia? Nice!

I have. Salvador is akin to New Orleans donīt you think? Yeah itīs a vibrant city, but I wouldnīt want to live there for more than a fortnight. I donīt like hot weather. Curitiba is more like, say, Vancouver. :)