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AKONI
2005-Oct-06, 01:56 AM
I want to buy a sci-fi/fantasy book that is appropriate for an 11 year old boy.

I wanted to buy him Titan by John Varley, but there are too many lesbian sex scenes in the book.

Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

James_Digriz
2005-Oct-06, 02:19 AM
I got my start on Terry Brook's The Sword of Shannara. Well, it was the first book I bought with my own money after reading a lot of my dads Larry Niven and Harry Harrison stuff.

I would highly recomend it. One of my favorite books of all time. The Sci-Fi stuff might be a little steep for him but any of the Known Space series by Niven or the first books in the Stainless Steel Rat series by Harrison would be good. It's what I cut my teeth on around 14.

Gemini
2005-Oct-06, 02:38 AM
2001 was an excellent read, I liked it when I was 14, which was 6 months ago :)

Gillianren
2005-Oct-06, 02:54 AM
in fantasy, let me recommend the excellent, hugely funny books of Terry Pratchett (one sex scene I can think of in the entire series, and it's not in the slightest explicit). my boyfriend likes pretty much anything by Tamora Pierce, though I frankly do not. I read Dune at not much older than 11, but I was an exceptional child. depending on the 11-year-old, the Vorkosigan saga by Lois McMaster Bujold might work, but it would take a relatively mature 11-year-old. (but there's no explicit sex, little violence, and little swearing. it's just that the themes are pretty dark. and both Shards of Honor and Barryar, available in omnibus as Cordelia's Honor, have war in 'em.)

there's the Tripod series by (brief pause as Gillian looks at her bookshelf) John Christopher. there's the works of Edward Eager and E. Nesbit, both of which are actually written for children. there's various books by Robin McKinley, though not Deerskin, which is based on an old and dark fairy tale. some of the Pern books, but again, it depends on the 11-year-old. there's the Riddlemaster of Hed series by Patricia McKillip, which I think I did read at 11.

and, of course, there's good ol' Harry Potter. and The Hobbit, the only Tolkein I ever finished.

Gemini
2005-Oct-06, 02:56 AM
Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy

James_Digriz
2005-Oct-06, 03:00 AM
Jack L Chalker's Demons at Rainbow Bridge series.

Dave Wolverton's Golden Queen series.

R. A. Salvatore's Drizit books. (Fantasy equal to Brooks and Tolkien.)

Piers Anthony's Blue Adept series.

You need to read the above plus Marrow by Robert Reed and Kiln People by David Brin. Those are the two greatest I have read in a while and went right to the top shelf on the bookcase with the best of the best when I was done with them. Simon Greens new Nightside series is a must read as well.

Swift
2005-Oct-06, 03:37 AM
If it doesn't have to be recent stuff, I would recommend a lot of the early Larry Niven stuff ("Known Universe").

AKONI
2005-Oct-07, 01:58 AM
Thank you all!

peter eldergill
2005-Oct-07, 02:52 AM
Foundation trilogy by Isaac Asimov. Nice, light, easy reading

Pete

EvilBob
2005-Oct-07, 05:12 AM
The 'His Dark Materials (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0440419514/ref=pd_sim_b_2/102-5167758-6480166?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance)' Series by Phillip Pullman. The first book was called 'Northern lights' when I read it, but has been reprinted as 'The golden Compass'. I haven't read the final instalment though....

Mosheh Thezion
2005-Oct-07, 07:14 AM
The Greatest Action hero and role model of all time, is Conan, but only of the tales written by Robert E. Howard, of which there are several, and Le spauge decamp is good, but no one writes like Howard.

Conan is everything every young boy wants to grow up to be, he is Chivarious naturally, yet wild and above all else, strong, but not so much of body, as in the mind of the character in the books.. his attitude is one of strenght and rightness, and calm wisdom.. He lacks prejudices, and always saves the ladies... vanqueshes evil left and right and usually saved the kingdom or land from a tyrant or wizard of evil intent.

I would fully recommend them to any young boy, assuming he is smart enough to know that knives hurt.. and are not toys.

The Movie of Conan.. is Not Conan.. they just bought the name, and changed the story so badly as to leave Conan as a dumb baboon with some skill.

when in the books he is, as ive said, everything I have always wanted to be...
Assuming i was 6.4 feet tall and 260 lbs of lean muscle, and lived 10,000 years ago.
-MT
Other than that.. Piers Anthonys Xanth series is very nice..
also The Chroinicles of Narnia are most excellent as i read them as an adult.

Probubly the best thing to give him is a giant.. super sized reference book, and Howards Conan Novels... Barnes and Nobles carry many.

James_Digriz
2005-Oct-07, 10:33 PM
The Conan books written by Steve Perry are excellent. Nice, light, fast entertaining reads. He only wrote about 5 of them sadly.

Disinfo Agent
2005-Oct-07, 10:37 PM
A book with a plot reminiscent of Titan, but less racy: Arthur C. Clarke's Rendezvous with Rama.

James_Digriz
2005-Oct-07, 10:51 PM
A book with a plot reminiscent of Titan, but less racy: Arthur C. Clarke's Rendezvous with Rama.

Forgot about that one. That's one of the books I read around 14 that got me into Sci-Fi.

(changed inot to into)

EricDerKonig
2005-Oct-08, 01:41 AM
I second the Tripod series, which I read in elementary school (actually, I started with the prequel, "When the Tripods Came," and read the others a few years later).
2001 was another I read as a wee lad, though in middle school.
There's a few novellas by Heinlein that were fun to read when I was about that age: Tunnel in the Sky, Citizen of the Galaxy, Farmer in the Sky, Space Cadet, Between Planets, Starship Troopers, quite a few more. Mostly his earlier works.

Asimov and Clarke are also be worth looking at.

Gillianren
2005-Oct-08, 02:27 AM
oh, yeah--A Wrinkle In Time! classic and intended for about that age level.

Enzp
2005-Oct-08, 05:02 AM
I second the Pratchett suggestion as easy fun reading.

When I was a kid that age I was reading Robert Heinlein books, and though they are dated, they are not so deeply written as to be inaccessible to a child. Adventurous stuff to me.

SOmething else I liked were the Tom Swift books. The old originals are probably better read as an adult retrospectively, but the TOm Swift Junior stuff was adventurous. I haven't look through the youth shelves lately, but for all I know there are Tom Swift III books. I think Tom appealed to me because I was a "science nerd" kind of kid, and Tom was all about using science and technology to get where he wanted to go, he invented things.

GO to the bookstore and look in the youth section, and there are a whole pile of "series" books. We had Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew along with Tom Swift, but I know ther are all manner of series out these days. Our kid liked the Goosebumps series for a while. With a series, if he likes a book, there are a whole lot more with the same characters waiting for his developing interest.

Arthur Clarke was a favorite, and don't overlook short story collections.

Disinfo Agent
2005-Oct-08, 12:12 PM
I haven't look through the youth shelves lately, but for all I know there are Tom Swift III books.And IV. (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=7792&highlight=Swift) Reading the III books is one of the fondest memories of my teens. :)

parallaxicality
2005-Oct-08, 12:16 PM
Pratchett is fun indeed, but hard to get into; it's difficult to know where to start. I found my first experience of Pratchett rather dull, but his universe grows with the reading, and, as you come to appreciate the characters more, the whole really does become far greater than the sum of its parts.

Terry Brooks ripped off Tolkien so shamelessly there really isn't much point in reading him- read The Lord of the Rings instead. It's far better.

When I was eleven I was reading Asimov's future history novels (Robots-Empire-Foundation), and I still recommend them, though, like Heinlein, there is some open discussion of sex, particularly in the later books. The Tripods are great fun, and (but?) very definitely aimed at kids.

His Dark Materials is a mixed bag. The first book is phenomenal, the second OK, but by the third book Pullman seems to go completely off his rocker. The last is certainly not intended as a children's novel and shouldn't be seen as such, but the first is fine for kids.

Narnia is beautifully written, but be prepared for some religious allegory which can get tiresome at times, especially in the final book, which is also loaded with a lot of weird anti-Islamic subtexts.

I would definitely reccomend the first three novels of the Hitchhiker series (the last two are not really kiddie friendly and quite frankly, they're crap). I can safely credit Douglas Adams with forming a great deal of my own personal philosophy.

James_Digriz
2005-Oct-08, 03:15 PM
Pratchett is fun indeed, but hard to get into; it's difficult to know where to start. I found my first experience of Pratchett rather dull, but his universe grows with the reading, and, as you come to appreciate the characters more, the whole really does become far greater than the sum of its parts.

Terry Brooks ripped off Tolkien so shamelessly there really isn't much point in reading him- read The Lord of the Rings instead. It's far better.



I'll have to give Prachets stuff a second chance then. I couldn't get into the first one.

Ideas do not exist in a vacuum. Saying Terry Brooks ripped off Tolkien is like saying Star Trek ripped off Star Wars. Every fantasy writer since Tolkien has most if not all of the same type of characters and situations in thier story. The next time your at the bookstore pick up most Fantasy hardcovers and you will be able to pick out Gandolf, Frodo, Aragorn, Smaug, Sheelob, Gimli, Black Riders, The White City, and countless other Tolkien references on the cover. Did Tolkien rip off the Brothers Grim and Viking Mythology then?

If you still count this as ripping off Tolkien Brooks got rich writting a series of books beloved by millions of fans. No shame in that. He also wrote a lot more books then Tolkien did.

I like Brooks and Tolkien equally. You are forgeting that Brooks has written about 13 books in the Shannara series as well. Obviously they can't all "Rip" off Tolkien.

Alasdhair
2005-Oct-08, 06:28 PM
I'll have to give Prachets stuff a second chance then. I couldn't get into the first one.

Mort is probably the best one to start with: if you don't like that one, there's precious little chance you'll like any of the others.

Gillianren
2005-Oct-09, 12:54 AM
warning: do not, ever, start the Pratchett books with The Colour of Magic. or The Light Fantastic. I started with Mort. my daughter will be receiving Wee Free Men for Christmas, and possibly Hat Full of Sky and The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents as well, if I feel I can afford it. (maybe Maurice for her birthday.) I tend to start people on Guards! Guards!, but since the daughter's going to be 8, the actual children's books are the way to go.

I never felt The Last Battle was anti-Islamic per se, just that, well, the man was an ardent Christian, so every other religion was wrong to him. at least he thought being a good person counted for something, right?

and no, Star Trek did not rip of Star Wars, given that Star Trek came first.

James_Digriz
2005-Oct-09, 04:56 AM
and no, Star Trek did not rip of Star Wars, given that Star Trek came first.

True, true. I saw Trek first in late night reruns so I forgot it came before Star Wars.

parallaxicality
2005-Oct-09, 02:43 PM
Did Tolkien rip off the Brothers Grim and Viking Mythology then?

Tolkien drew influence equally from "viking" mythology (better to say "Norse") as from all branches of the Germanic mythos, including Anglo-Saxon. Principally, he ripped off Beowulf, with bits from the Nebulungenlied, but that's OK, they're in the public domain.

And it's "Grimm."

Gillianren, there are some fairly sharp barbs aimed at Islam in The Last Battle, particularly when the "false prophet" spreads his "lie" about Tash being merely another name for Aslan- essentially, he's saying that Muslims are wrong to claim that their God is the same as that of the Christians. In fact, by the end of the book, we learn that Lewis believes their God is a demon.

James_Digriz
2005-Oct-09, 11:12 PM
Tolkien drew influence equally from "viking" mythology (better to say "Norse") as from all branches of the Germanic mythos, including Anglo-Saxon. Principally, he ripped off Beowulf, with bits from the Nebulungenlied, but that's OK, they're in the public domain.

We are just disagreing on terminology. I don't consider what Brooks or the 100's of fantasy writers after him did by imitating Tolkien to be ripping him off. Remember my point about ideas not existing in a vacuum.

Like I said before the similarities are mainly with some of the main characters and those similarities were mostely gone after the first book. Brooks has written 12 more books in the series since then.

Gillianren
2005-Oct-10, 02:08 AM
Gillianren, there are some fairly sharp barbs aimed at Islam in The Last Battle, particularly when the "false prophet" spreads his "lie" about Tash being merely another name for Aslan- essentially, he's saying that Muslims are wrong to claim that their God is the same as that of the Christians. In fact, by the end of the book, we learn that Lewis believes their God is a demon.

actually, he himself didn't, you know, if you read his nonfiction. he didn't actually believe all gods were the same, but you do have to remember that some of what appears in the Narnia books is just there to make a good story. (I could go into detail, but it would be quite tedious quite quickly.)

James_Digriz
2005-Oct-13, 02:43 AM
he didn't actually believe all gods were the same, but you do have to remember that some of what appears in the Narnia books is just there to make a good story. (I could go into detail, but it would be quite tedious quite quickly.)

Is that series any good? The movie looks very good and I saw the annimated show they did on the first book but I haven't read any of them.

Gillianren
2005-Oct-13, 07:40 PM
Is that series any good? The movie looks very good and I saw the annimated show they did on the first book but I haven't read any of them.

The books are excellent. Now, granted, yes, very Christian. Given C. S. Lewis, they would be. However, he is willing to take rather astonishing flights of fancy away from pure allegory. (The movie looks excellent. None of the previous attempts have been up to my personal standards, yet I still have hope.)

Weird Dave
2005-Oct-13, 09:09 PM
I wanted to buy him Titan by John Varley, but there are too many lesbian sex scenes in the book.
Nitpick - unless there are two books called Titan, it was by Stephen Baxter. I don't remember that much sex in it, but please don't get it for him anyway. It's incredibly, gruesomely depressing, probably putting him off space travel for life.:sad: It is a good book - just not one to make you happy.

I second (or third or whatever) Narnia, Discworld, Tripods and the Hobbit. Rama is good, but don't get him any of the sequels - at least one has an explicit (and cringeworthy) sex scene.

I liked The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster as a child.

Disinfo Agent
2005-Oct-13, 09:54 PM
Titan, by John Varley. (http://members.aol.com/siure/varley2.htm) Kids, today... :p

Ilya
2005-Oct-13, 10:36 PM
For SF I definitely second Niven and Heinlein -- although Heinlein is dated by now.

"Blue Adept" may be a little high on erotic-meter.

Absolutely hate "Stainless Steel Rat" -- at least the first book. It is not a SF world -- it is 1970's Middle America with spaceships pasted on. Everything that happened in this book could happen now -- in fact some things could not happen today because of the advances in forensics and surveillance since it was written! Later books are okay, but not great IMO.

For fantasy, you can't go wrong with Tolkien. Never read Pratchitt, altough I keep meaning to. Salvatore's "Driz'zt" books were a bore -- what fun is a hero who NEVER loses a confronation? However, Salvatore allowed other authors to write stories in his universe, and some of those are great! Six books of "War of the Spider Queen" series (in Salvatore's universe) are my absolute favorite fantasy -- and Driz'zt is thankfully absent :)

Gullible Jones
2005-Oct-14, 12:30 AM
I will never forgive Brooks for Sword of Shannara, which is simply a blatant ripoff. Maybe his other Shannara books aren't, but I don't find Brooks a good enough writer to look at them.

Clarke is generally fine for a preadolescent reader. 2001, Childhood's End, Rendezvous with Rama, and Against the Fall of Night are all good reading. The stuff cowritten with other authors tends to be terrible, though.

In the fantasy department, LeGuin's Earthsea series is excellent; same goes for Tolkien's works.

Some of LeGuin's Ekumen stories are appropriate for children; others... well... aren't. Read Four Ways to Forgiveness and you'll know what I'm talking about. (In case you ask, no, The Left Hand of Darkness isn't anything like that. It's barely erotic at all.)

Heinlein's Farmer in the Sky is good.

James_Digriz
2005-Oct-14, 12:55 AM
Salvatore's "Driz'zt" books were a bore -- what fun is a hero who NEVER loses a confronation?

You didn't read them all then. Drizzit got defeated on more then one occasion. He got captured by the Drow and was going to be tourtured to death untill Catti Brier rescued him. Then he got killed by Enteri and had to be brought back to life by the Drow.


Absolutely hate "Stainless Steel Rat" -- at least the first book. It is not a SF world -- it is 1970's Middle America with spaceships pasted on. Everything that happened in this book could happen now -- in fact some things could not happen today because of the advances in forensics and surveillance since it was written! Later books are okay, but not great IMO.


What about Star Wars? Just spaceships pasted on a fantasy world. Niether technique tainted my enjoyment.


I will never forgive Brooks for Sword of Shannara, which is simply a blatant ripoff. Maybe his other Shannara books aren't, but I don't find Brooks a good enough writer to look at them.

Starting with book TWO. Like I said before go look at the covers of the fantasy hardcovers out right now and you will see Tolkien references everywhere. You guys are being too hard on him anyway. Look at how the game HALO copied the space marines from the movie Aliens.

Gullible Jones
2005-Oct-14, 10:11 PM
Did LeGuin rip off Tolkien when writing the Earthsea series?

Nope. (Rocannon's World seemed Tolkien-inspired, but the characters were not replicas of Tolkien's.)

Did Pullman rip off Tolkein in HDM?

Nope. (Though I did detect some inspiration from C.S. Lewis.)

Does Jack Vance rip off Tolkien in his fantasy stories?

Nope.

For that matter, did Stephen King rip off Tolkien in his Dark Tower series?

You guessed the answer... Nope. (Although that series jumped the shark rather fast, IMHO.)

parallaxicality
2005-Oct-14, 11:12 PM
Did Pullman rip off Tolkein in HDM?

Nope. (Though I did detect some inspiration from C.S. Lewis.)


That's a rather liberal use of the word "some." "The Subtle Knife" was basically "The Magician's Nephew" with action sequences, angels communing with PCs, and the I Ching instead of God.


For that matter, did Stephen King rip off Tolkien in his Dark Tower series?

You guessed the answer... Nope.

Except for calling his universe "Mid-World," which is nothing like Middle-Earth whatsoever, and giving Blaine the Mono the exact same riddles that Bilbo and Gollum exchanged, and including a tempting, addictive seeing-stone that allowed you to see far away things as long as they were bad, and having the lord of evil's symbol being an eye on a flag, and Mia asking for "her precious," and, for that matter, both having a Dark Tower.

Gullible Jones
2005-Oct-15, 12:09 AM
Except for calling his universe "Mid-World," which is nothing like Middle-Earth whatsoever, and giving Blaine the Mono the exact same riddles that Bilbo and Gollum exchanged, and including a tempting, addictive seeing-stone that allowed you to see far away things as long as they were bad, and having the lord of evil's symbol being an eye on a flag, and Mia asking for "her precious," and, for that matter, both having a Dark Tower.

Oh? My bad, then. Didn't read past the third book.

(Ah well, what can one expect from Stephen King...)

Though I don't remember Blaine giving the riddles from The Hobbit, not all of them anyway. "You've got to prime my pump, but it primes backwards" was definitely not on Gollum's list.

Gillianren
2005-Oct-15, 12:43 AM
Except for calling his universe "Mid-World," which is nothing like Middle-Earth whatsoever, and giving Blaine the Mono the exact same riddles that Bilbo and Gollum exchanged, and including a tempting, addictive seeing-stone that allowed you to see far away things as long as they were bad, and having the lord of evil's symbol being an eye on a flag, and Mia asking for "her precious," and, for that matter, both having a Dark Tower.

And I'm sure Stephen King'll admit it, too, given that he has such high respect for Tolkein. And Pratchett said that all fantasy is rearranging the furniture in Tolkein's attic. However, while I haven't gotten far into the Dark Tower either (and I really quite like King), it can't be as blatant "borrowing" as the Wheel of Time's "borrowing" of Arthurian legend. (You'd think he'd at least change the names instead of just the spelling!)

Disinfo Agent
2005-Oct-15, 02:14 PM
Speaking of fantasy for youngsters, I read Lloyd Alexander's Chronicles of Prydain series in my teens, and loved it.
Also good: Michael Ende's Neverending Story (the film adaptation isn't bad, but the book is so much better).

Weird Dave
2005-Oct-15, 07:03 PM
Titan, by John Varley. (http://members.aol.com/siure/varley2.htm) Kids, today... :p
OK, that's a new one for me. It sounds rather different to Baxter's version...

Weird Dave
2005-Oct-15, 07:08 PM
Another one: Elidor by Alan Garner. Intended for children, and very surreal IMO. It's a fantasy, where the fantasy world intrudes on ours in odd ways. Not a unique idea, of course, but very well done.

Ilya
2005-Oct-15, 07:35 PM
OK, that's a new one for me. It sounds rather different to Baxter's version...
EXTREMELY different... and dated by now.

ranugad
2005-Oct-15, 08:39 PM
I didn't see this one mentioned:

ERAGON by Christopher Paolini

He liked it enough to want the sequel, ELDEST.

He read it after finishing Tolkien's Hobbitt AND LOTR.

Saw the hardack at Walmart for like 16-17, waiting for the soft.
here's his website:

Alagaesia (http://www.alagaesia.com/)

Strabo
2005-Oct-15, 09:05 PM
I didn't see this one mentioned:

ERAGON by Christopher Paolini

He liked it enough to want the sequel, ELDEST.

He read it after finishing Tolkien's Hobbitt AND LOTR.

Saw the hardack at Walmart for like 16-17, waiting for the soft.
here's his website:

Alagaesia (http://www.alagaesia.com/)

Ah, Eragon, opinions are divided on that, if you look at the Amazon.com reviews, most of them are slamming it for being very unoriginal and blatant ripping off pretty much every major fantasy series written. Which it is. If there's an orignal idea in that book, I haven't found it. But I though it was a pretty interesting read, and they good ideas he's stolen. It should be a good fantasy book for a young child, it's rather simplistic and they won't notice the ripoffness until they've read around abit more.

I can recomend Terry Pratchett as well. I'd suggest starting on the Nomes (Bromeliad) trilogy, those are still some of my favourite books, and were written primarily for children.

About Narnia, I thought they were good when I was 12 or so, but now (At 18) they're hoplessly cringe worthy and soaked in religious allusions that ruin it for me.

Anything by Tamora Pierce, but I prefer her earlier books, especially the Immortals series.

I'd also recomend the Tripods trilogy by John Christopher. Does anyone else remember this series, which is another one of my favourites?
[Edit:] Whoa! It seems that a tripods movie is being planned! http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0447711/ Great news!

Gillianren
2005-Oct-16, 02:55 AM
Er, at least three people already mentioned the Tripods series, starting with me.

parallaxicality
2005-Oct-16, 09:26 AM
EXTREMELY different... and dated by now.

Well, ya never know... Maybe she'll show up in Earth orbit demanding damages from ESA because Huygens ruined her perm.

Ilya
2005-Oct-18, 05:07 PM
Well, in the book she DID say she can not move at all, except for minor orbital adjustments... :)

That's not what I meant by "dated", though. True, one dated concept is a 7-person spaceship arriving at Saturn apparently without a single unmanned probe preceding, but mostly I was thinking of the very "1970's feel" to the book. Free love and widespread drugs. Everyone on board the ship sleeps with everyone else (in series, not at once) except for two clones who are in an exclusive incestuous lesbian relationship (that's a mouthful!) -- and NASA is described as prudish! Apparently because NASA prefers the above facts not to be known to public. And if you think that streches the belief, cocaine is not only legal, but is allowed on board. I doubt any publisher today would touch such a book with a ten-foot pole for that reason alone.

sarongsong
2009-Sep-20, 02:51 AM
Looking for a recommended book on Russia's military adventures in Afghanistan.

redshifter
2009-Sep-21, 08:09 AM
Anything by Jules Verne or HG Wells. Heinlein's 'juvenile' books might be good as well, such as Have Space Suit, Will Travel

What got me started in SF at that age were Star Trek novels.

Gillianren
2009-Sep-21, 08:29 AM
Graham's been listening to a lot of Tamora Pierce lately, and while I'd still he rather listen to it than Cat Who, I'm still developing an intense detestation of the woman and all of her characters.

Ilya
2009-Oct-15, 02:37 AM
Looking for a recommended book on Russia's military adventures in Afghanistan.
Try "Kara Kush" by Idries Shah.

sarongsong
2009-Oct-16, 02:37 AM
Thanks, Ilya---will be off to Barnes & Noble tomorrow!

sarongsong
2009-Oct-22, 11:13 PM
Just a quick tip---the B&N Store didn't have it in stock, so I ordered one of the "Used" copies from Amazon's website for less than $3 (new price was $27). It arrived today and turned out to be an officially "Withdrawn" copy from the Baldwin Public Library, Birmingham, Michigan---in "as new" condition! :)

HenrikOlsen
2009-Oct-22, 11:34 PM
Aren't those copies not supposed to be resold?

I know that used book stores here in Denmark refuse to buy ex-library books.

Gillianren
2009-Oct-23, 12:07 AM
Aren't those copies not supposed to be resold?

I know that used book stores here in Denmark refuse to buy ex-library books.

Ha. I bought one off Amazon once that turned out to be from my own library system but had ended up halfway across the country before coming back to me.

No, our library system, and the ones back home, will occasionally sell theirs or else donate them to charities.

mike alexander
2009-Oct-23, 11:07 PM
Indeed. Followed by Wizard and Demon.

edit

Huh? Teach me to hold something instead of just pushing the send button.