PDA

View Full Version : Gravitational trouble at the BBC



catpain_kangaroo
2005-Oct-13, 08:41 PM
Just saw this at the BBC News service (Clicky (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/4340102.stm)):


[...]Shenzhou VI, which has two astronauts on board, is in a low enough orbit to be affected by the Earth's gravitational pull. (My emphasis)


I wonder when newspeople will realise that the earths gravity extends quite a bit away from the planet...



My first thread, and my first post. Please be gentle with me...

Gullible Jones
2005-Oct-13, 09:21 PM
Aggh! This is basic, high school physics!

Van Rijn
2005-Oct-14, 12:42 AM
Just saw this at the BBC News service (Clicky (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/4340102.stm)):


[...]Shenzhou VI, which has two astronauts on board, is in a low enough orbit to be affected by the Earth's gravitational pull. (My emphasis)


I wonder when newspeople will realise that the earths gravity extends quite a bit away from the planet...



My first thread, and my first post. Please be gentle with me...

Welcome to BAUT! Yes, we talked a little bit about that in another thread, here is my post:

http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?p=577874#post577873

I'm pretty sure they meant "atmosphere" instead of "gravitational pull." A perigee of 124 miles (in the initial orbit) is pretty low.

publiusr
2005-Oct-14, 05:44 PM
I expect more from the BBC.