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TheBlackCat
2005-Nov-03, 06:01 AM
This is not about your screen name, but you real name. How did your parents (or whoever named you) come up with your name? Also, while you are at it, what does your name actually mean in the country it originated in?

cran
2005-Nov-03, 06:21 AM
This is not about your screen name, but you real name. How did your parents (or whoever named you) come up with your name? Also, while you are at it, what does your name actually mean in the country it originated in? In my case, they are the same.
My mother made up my first name on the day I was born; until then, I was going to be 'Sean' (I still have the congrats telegram from my grandfather to my mother, naming me as 'Sean') ... my mother decided that 'Sean Herlihy' sounded too Irish ... she also wanted something in my name to reflect her stepfather's name (she adored him), but his given names were Oswald Horace - not very inspiring, she thought ... the family name was 'Cranwell', so she took the first part of that. My formal name is Cranston, but I was only ever called that when I was in trouble ... :eh:
The irony is that 'Cran' is probably more Irish than 'Sean', at least in Southwest Ireland where my forebears came from (well, three of them anyway ... who's been sleeping in my porridge?)

Enzp
2005-Nov-03, 07:30 AM
My dad was a McCallum, and my mom a Stewart, so when I was born they wanted something more or less Scottish, so they named me Douglas Bruce.

What does DOuglas Bruce mean? It means I must have done something to irritate my mother. It is generally followed by "come here this instant."

Philip A
2005-Nov-03, 07:58 AM
Dull and uninteresting, same as my father.

Candy
2005-Nov-03, 07:59 AM
Mother wanted to name me Baby K. Father wanted the name Candy. They compromised and named me Candy Kay. Candy (or variations) were a popular name in the 60's here in the USA. I went to school with another Candy and Kandi. My brother named his daughter, Candace. I guess you could say Candy means Sweet. I am also dubbed Dulce (Spanish), Bon Bon (French), and Ami (Japanese) by certain friends.

Maksutov
2005-Nov-03, 08:07 AM
I have no idea. They probably pulled it out of a hat.

Enzp
2005-Nov-03, 08:29 AM
Your name is "Six and Seven-eighths"???

Lianachan
2005-Nov-03, 08:40 AM
I was named after my grandfather on my father's side. The first name I have has always been the name of the eldest son on my father's side of the family - going back at least as far as the 1600's, which is where it gets murky. For my own eldest son, he's only got the name as his middle name. This caused much wailing and gnashing of teeth for my mother and father, but the rest of the family (including all his siblings) supported it wholeheartedly.

Maksutov
2005-Nov-03, 08:49 AM
Your name is "Six and Seven-eighths"???Since it's "In this Style 10/6", I guess they pulled it from outside the hat.

http://img484.imageshack.us/img484/835/tennielalice7ya.th.png (http://img484.imageshack.us/my.php?image=tennielalice7ya.png)

devilmech
2005-Nov-03, 09:05 AM
My first name is derived from the gaelic word for "wood", and my surname is a scottish adaptation of the gaelic word for "ore". My actual origins as far back as I can trace are Irish and Swedish, although I've only been able to put together a genealogy back to 1892 where I'm stuck with a passenger listing for a boat to America and no way to trace back further.

Lianachan
2005-Nov-03, 09:45 AM
My first name is derived from the gaelic word for "wood", and my surname is a scottish adaptation of the gaelic word for "ore". My actual origins as far back as I can trace are Irish and Swedish, although I've only been able to put together a genealogy back to 1892 where I'm stuck with a passenger listing for a boat to America and no way to trace back further.

Coille Min, eh?

(that's the wrong way round, I know - min is Irish, and coille is Scottish Gaelic)

Candy
2005-Nov-03, 10:01 AM
Dull and uninteresting, same as my father.
Baby Names World (http://www.babynamesworld.com/meaning_of_Philip.html)
Name: Philip
Gender: Male
Origin: Greek
Meaning: Horse Lover

According to the Baby Names, it is very popular. This website is a hoot.

jrkeller
2005-Nov-03, 12:24 PM
First Name - John after my grandfather

Middle Name - Robert probably after my father

Last Name - Keller means Cellar in German

Argos
2005-Nov-03, 12:40 PM
I hate my first name, and I think my parents made a terrible mistake.

Heid the Ba'
2005-Nov-03, 01:08 PM
Following on from Lianachan;

As a second son I have my maternal grandfather's first name, mother's maiden name and father's surname.

farmerjumperdon
2005-Nov-03, 01:09 PM
Father's first name for my first name, maternal grandfather's first name for my middle name. Celtic blood - mother was Irish, father was Scottish with a little English thrown in (probably a result of border raiding).

ToSeek
2005-Nov-03, 02:46 PM
My real name is Kevin, and my mother just liked it. She said she got it from Invasion of the Body Snatchers actor Kevin McCarthy.

Jakenorrish
2005-Nov-03, 03:09 PM
My name was given to me due to my Dad liking the rock band 'Free'. They did a song called 'My Brother Jake' which he loved!

My sister is named Lucy, and I'll leave you to figure out why!

Arneb
2005-Nov-03, 03:15 PM
Jens Peter - after a Danish writer (http://www.nndb.com/people/794/000097503/)my father was reading at the time.

teddyv
2005-Nov-03, 03:22 PM
All my names (3) are after the three brothers on my dad's side (including my dad). Theodore is also the family name on that side. I believe it means "gift of God" in Greek.

Maksutov
2005-Nov-03, 04:17 PM
My real name is Kevin, and my mother just liked it. She said she got it from Invasion of the Body Snatchers actor Kevin McCarthy.One of Kevin McCarthy's nephews is one of my neighbors. His name is (hang on) Kevin McCarthy.

No pods in the area so far...

Laminal Cockroach
2005-Nov-03, 04:24 PM
My real name is Souraneel (phoenetically - Shou - row - neel) well im an indian bengali originally, and i think i was named by my grandfather... It means the blue universe or maybe the solar system, "shoura" means Solar system or universe, not quite sure... and "neel" simply means blue. and what a coincidence when i grew up i like astronomy, isnt that amazing? ;)

Gillianren
2005-Nov-03, 07:31 PM
My mother's favorite aunt was her aunt Edith, who died when she was young. It wasn't enough that I ended up the middle child--oh, no, I had to get the name I won't grow into until I'm 70!

My middle name is Rose. My mother just likes that name, and she refused to give me the other middle name she'd considered, which was Ann. (Lily Tomlin fans will know why.)

When my a couple-greats grandfather came to America from Denmark, he was Nels Nelsen. He came through Ellis Island and changed it to "Nelson," to make it more American. He learned English, and then he never spoke a word of Danish again. (Also, according to family lore, he married Robert E. Lee's niece, who got disowned over it.)

What's fun is that my older sister was born on my Grandmother Nelson's birthday. Well, Mom and Grandma Nelson never got along (to this day, nearly eleven years after the woman died, Mom'll still tell me how she never liked her), but Grandma Nelson assumed my sister'd be named after her.

Mom declared there were too many Susans and Elizabeths in the family as it was (true), and named my sister Elaine, which is a variant of my Grandma Dillon's first name, Helen. Grandma Nelson then promptly introduced Elaine to her pastor the first time they visited as "little Susan Elizabeth." According to Grandma, she then called Elaine "little what's-her-name" until about the time I was born two years later.

jrkeller
2005-Nov-03, 08:46 PM
A colleague of mine who is about sixty has a very interesting first and middle name. John Wayne.

His parents were born in Germany, they liked to give their children American names. Since he was the youngest child in a family of 13 his parents had run out of ideas, so his older brother and sister named him. They saw his future name on the marquee of a movie theatre

publiusr
2005-Nov-03, 08:53 PM
My middle name is the same as my Dads. My Mom just chose Jeffery--though everyone else spells that Jeffrey.

My Dad's first name is interesting. His first name was Tunnell. His Dad thought a lot of some folks whose last name was Tunnell and gave that name to my Dad, Tunnell Wright. Mom called him "Tunt" "T-berry" or just "T." They both died last year.

Kebsis
2005-Nov-03, 10:27 PM
I was named after my great grandfather on my mothers side (my name is Greg). My middle name is James, which is the traditional name of male children on my fathers side (almost all first-born males on my fathers side of the family are named James, as confusing as that can be sometimes).

JohnD
2005-Nov-03, 10:34 PM
My name here is my real name - not the whole real name or nothing but the name, but my name.

Knowing the nature of her family and my father's, my mother gave me a name no one in either had had for as long as anyone could remember. Whereupon my father's sister, a historian, produced my great^5 grandfather from her researches, also John. Mother never forgave her!

JohnD

DukePaul
2005-Nov-03, 11:32 PM
My mother went out on a limb and named me after the man she thought was my father. Lucky she was right.

EvilBob
2005-Nov-03, 11:35 PM
My sister is named Lucy, and I'll leave you to figure out why! She's a fussbudget (http://www.petcaretips.net/lucy_linus.html)?

I got my name because my Dad is a fan of Dylan Thomas. He hoped I'd grow up to become either a poet, or a drunk.

TheBlackCat
2005-Nov-03, 11:47 PM
Wow, this topic went better than I expected.

I was named after a doctor my parents hated, Dr. Todd Somethingorother. They hated the doctor, but liked the name, so here I am. Apparently my name means "Fox", but my parents didn't know that until I was about 15.

My sister's name is more interesing. She was originally going to be named "Kimberly", but when my parents saw her they decided she didn't look like a Kimberly so they named her Mary Malinda. My Mom's name is Mary Malinda, as was my great-grandmother. I think they are trying to start a trend where every first born daughter of a first born daughter is named "Mary Malinda". Luckily it is no too confusing because my great-grandmother was called "Mary", my mom is called "Molly", and my sister is called "Mindy" or "Malinda" (or "Minderoo" :p). My cousin is now named Kimberly, which was also a last-second change (I don't remember what she was originally going to be called).

My middle name is my paternal grandmother's maiden name. That is also a custom for the first-born son of the first-born son.

Josh
2005-Nov-04, 01:10 AM
My name is, obviously, Josh. I like it. It means Saviour in Hebrew and i think that's rather apt .. or at least i'd like it to be. As far as i know it's just a name they liked. No middle name - my parents couldn't afford one.

It was WAY better than the alternatives. Shoshanna wouldn't fit because i didn't pop out a girl, and the other boy name my dad liked was .... wait for it .... Peleg. That's wrong on so many levels.

trinitree88
2005-Nov-04, 01:20 AM
I was named for my uncle George, my dad's youngest brother, who contracted tuberculosis while serving in the navy in the Phillipines during World War 2. He returned home, to Brockton, but never recovered and died in the VA hospital shortly afterward. My dad could never talk about it without crying. There were cures for TB by then. I was going to be named Phillip by my mom...which I liked less, so there was some grace. It means "farmer" in Latin, and I have always been close to the soil...grew up in a little town with cow farms, and played there as a kid. I can grow most anything, and enjoy teaching people how to.....many a customer has thanked me for knowing the subtle nuances of growing the trickier plants....very relaxing, and I have done some of my best physics in the fields while daydreaming. Einstein would have preferred the profession of lighthouse keeper for no distractions . I agree with Candy, though...this thread is quite a hoot. Pete is a nickname conjured up by my best friend in junior high, Kevin O'Brien.....his daughter ran for governor last year..just missed.

Draconis
2005-Nov-04, 01:29 AM
My first name means "Light-bearer," and my last (in Scots Gaelic) means "Clan of the Bear."

*If I could get my hands on the guy who suggested them to my parents...*

:wall:

Candy
2005-Nov-04, 01:49 AM
My first name means "Light-bearer," and my last (in Scots Gaelic) means "Clan of the Bear."

*If I could get my hands on the guy who suggested them to my parents...*

:wall:
You're too much to bear! Sorry for the very bad attempt at a pun.

Draconis
2005-Nov-04, 02:36 AM
Very Punny.

:doh:

Jakenorrish
2005-Nov-04, 03:02 PM
[QUOTE=EvilBob]She's a fussbudget (http://www.petcaretips.net/lucy_linus.html)?QUOTE]

No, he was also a Beatles fan!

Lianachan
2005-Nov-04, 05:09 PM
My first name means "Light-bearer," and my last (in Scots Gaelic) means "Clan of the Bear."

*If I could get my hands on the guy who suggested them to my parents...*

:wall:

Good day, Mr.......Matheson?

tlbs101
2005-Nov-04, 05:29 PM
My first name is from a ggf on my mother's side.

My last name can be traced back to England (c 1750). The progenitor, centuries before, probably worked in a bank, hence the name Pound, then Poundson, then Pounds.

Maybe some of you Brits have a better idea of where 'Pound' or 'Pounds' might have come from.

Draconis
2005-Nov-04, 05:37 PM
Don't know the man, I'm afraid. :)

Titana
2005-Nov-04, 05:50 PM
My Mom was originally from Sinaloa Mexico and my father all American borned and raised in California. Ok since my Mom was from Mexico she wanted just a Mexican name for me , but my father did not so they split she gave me my second name Diana although Diana is not exactly a spanish name but is very used in Mexico. And my father gave me my first name Sherry so my name is Sherry Diana....


Titana........

cran
2005-Nov-04, 09:30 PM
My real name is Kevin, and my mother just liked it. She said she got it from Invasion of the Body Snatchers actor Kevin McCarthy.Pleased to meet you, Kevin. You're not looking quite as green anymore (maybe it was just my monitor playing up before ...)

cran
2005-Nov-04, 09:43 PM
My real name is Souraneel (phoenetically - Shou - row - neel) well im an indian bengali originally, and i think i was named by my grandfather... It means the blue universe or maybe the solar system, "shoura" means Solar system or universe, not quite sure... and "neel" simply means blue. and what a coincidence when i grew up i like astronomy, isnt that amazing? ;) I like your name - good sound, Souraneel ... stick with "blue universe" for the meaning ... :)

Kemal
2005-Nov-04, 09:58 PM
My name means "honor" in Turkish and was given to me by my parents.

cran
2005-Nov-04, 10:36 PM
My name means "honor" in Turkish and was given to me by my parents. Another great name!

Well done, TheBlackCat (Todd?) - an excellent idea! ;)

Laminal Cockroach
2005-Nov-04, 10:38 PM
I like your name - good sound, Souraneel ... stick with "blue universe" for the meaning ... :)
Thankyou, somebody actually likes it :razz: , though loads of people refuse to pronounce it properly and just call me suneel, my best friend thinks suneel means a warrior in some language, and i should like it better than souraneel... :think:

My name means "honor" in Turkish and was given to me by my parents.
What? the name or the honour? or both ;)

cran
2005-Nov-04, 10:46 PM
Thankyou, somebody actually likes it :razz: , though loads of people refuse to pronounce it properly and just call me suneel, my best friend thinks suneel means a warrior in some language, and i should like it better than souraneel... :think: Perhaps Sunil (Suntraks2 - I hope I spelled that correctly :shifty:) has some insight on that?
But, ask yourself, what is a mere warrior compared with a universe? :D

edited to add: Good thing my background isn't Scots - otherwise my (shortened) name means "a measure of herring" ...

Laminal Cockroach
2005-Nov-04, 10:52 PM
Very true, a mere warrior is nothis compared to possible an astronaut or a scientist... i'ld rather be souraneel

cran
2005-Nov-04, 11:28 PM
Then Souraneel, be like the warrior in pursuing your dream ... in fact, why not be both a scientist and an astronaut - we need more of them!

paulie jay
2005-Nov-05, 03:37 AM
My name (Paul) means "small", but it wasn't chosen for any particular reason.

As for my surname (Jones) I prefer the Mexican pronounciation...

The Mangler
2005-Nov-05, 03:57 AM
Joshua. From the bible, destroyed Jericho, successor of Moses.
My middle name (Allen) is the same as my dad's, which is the same as his dad's, which is his dad's first name.
Last name originally meant 'angel' in german. Spelling has been changed over time though.

Enzp
2005-Nov-05, 07:06 AM
I admit up front that I don't know what I am talking about, so straighten me out. I have the notion that Scandinavian names - I associate this with Sweden - are formed from the fathers name. So by this theory when Sven has a son Erik, Erik is named Erik Svenson, then when Erik has a son Ole, his name becomes Ole Erikson, and so on. IS this even remotely the case?

I have seen names in the form Eriksdotter, so perhaps it works for females as well.

If this is indeed what happens, how would one trace ancestry? Or is there some sort of lineage name that we don't hear? A patronymic of some sort?

Or am I just getting a blank stare from the Scandinavians?

Eroica
2005-Nov-05, 10:40 AM
My first name means "Light-bearer," .... Please tell me you weren't named Lucifer (or Phosphorus)! :)

Draconis
2005-Nov-05, 10:42 AM
Please tell me you weren't named Lucifer (or Phosphorus)! :)

:naughty:

:D

No, "Christopher."

Heh. "Phosphorus." That's be an interesting first name, yep.

Laminal Cockroach
2005-Nov-05, 12:01 PM
No, "Christopher."
Heh. "Phosphorus." That's be an interesting first name, yep.

would indeed, if your teachers think you're clever, they could say... "phosphorus is very bright" :cool:

LurchGS
2005-Nov-05, 04:58 PM
Interesting - it seems that a large percentage of names here are from the Island Kingdoms (Brittania)..

My first (Erik), I believe means "King"... Scandanavian/Czech origin...My parents picked it to please the norse side of the family - without picking a relative (I'm the first Erik in the tree). The name was also picked because, at the time, it was virtually unused here in the states. Even today, I've run into very few my age and older...

My last (Kloeppel) is Germanic, and technically means "Clapper of the Bell" . As far as geneology goes, it appears that manny years ago, the family had a history of service to the church, which included a love of noise, so they took the name "Bell Ringer"

To keep the tradition, I should introduce the monsters - Kodiak Alexander and Kenai Jordan. Both Boys. As with me, the names were picked to NOT honor family members (cuz for every one picked, there would be a bundle irate that they were not). Kodiak was born in Key West (and almost named Godzilla, but my wife was awake), and Kenai was born just north of Seattle.

As you might guess, I spent time in Alaska and loved it there. And it wasn't until he was almost two that my sister pointed out that Kodiak Alexander Kloeppel would conjunct (is that a word?) to "Kodiak AK". I could shoot myself for not noticing that.

-----------

Lordy, that was a lot of words for so little meaningful infornation

Gillianren
2005-Nov-05, 06:13 PM
:naughty:

:D

No, "Christopher."

Heh. "Phosphorus." That's be an interesting first name, yep.

"Christopher" means "Christ-carrier." Got the word "Christ" right in it, you see? I can tell you the legend of St. Christopher, who took the name after he supposedly, well, carried Christ, if you like. (But he was purged in the sixties, on account of they don't think he existed.)

As to genealogy and patronymics . . . that's a really good question, and I don't know the answer. I know the Russians use the patronymic as a middle name ("Peter Illych Tchaikovsky," for example), but I'm not sure how my own ancestors, the Danes, tracked that sort of thing.

LurchGS
2005-Nov-05, 07:55 PM
I admit up front that I don't know what I am talking about, so straighten me out. I have the notion that Scandinavian names - I associate this with Sweden - are formed from the fathers name. So by this theory when Sven has a son Erik, Erik is named Erik Svenson, then when Erik has a son Ole, his name becomes Ole Erikson, and so on. IS this even remotely the case?

I have seen names in the form Eriksdotter, so perhaps it works for females as well.

If this is indeed what happens, how would one trace ancestry? Or is there some sort of lineage name that we don't hear? A patronymic of some sort?

Or am I just getting a blank stare from the Scandinavians?

Nope - that's the way it's been explained to me since I was knee high to a moose.

A moose bit my sister once...

cran
2005-Nov-06, 02:32 AM
"Christopher" means "Christ-carrier." Got the word "Christ" right in it, you see? One translation of 'Christ' is 'Light of the World' - hence, 'Christopher' = bearer of the Light (of the World)and 'Christian' = follower of the Light (etc) ...


I can tell you the legend of St. Christopher, who took the name after he supposedly, well, carried Christ, if you like. (But he was purged in the sixties, on account of they don't think he existed.)
He might have been 'purged' by the bureaucracy, but remains 'alive and well' among travellers, taxi-drivers, and many families.

EvilBob
2005-Nov-06, 04:29 AM
A moose bit my sister once...
I've heard moose bites kan be pretti nasti....

Dr Nigel
2005-Nov-06, 06:55 PM
I admit up front that I don't know what I am talking about, so straighten me out. I have the notion that Scandinavian names - I associate this with Sweden - are formed from the fathers name. So by this theory when Sven has a son Erik, Erik is named Erik Svenson, then when Erik has a son Ole, his name becomes Ole Erikson, and so on. IS this even remotely the case?

I have seen names in the form Eriksdotter, so perhaps it works for females as well.

If this is indeed what happens, how would one trace ancestry? Or is there some sort of lineage name that we don't hear? A patronymic of some sort?

Or am I just getting a blank stare from the Scandinavians?

I'm not Scandinavian, but I know that in Iceland, patronynmics are used in place of a surname. So, the children of Erik might be named (say) Anna Eriksdottir and Sven Erikssen, and if Erik's father was a Sven, Erik would be Erik Svenssen. Not sure about my spellings though...

My own name (Nigel) means "the dark one" (from Latin niger = black). Do not underestimate the power of the dark side, children. My surname (Depledge) is a bit tricky. My brother once had the name traced, and the result given was that it comes from Old English "dap ladge" meaning "deep lake", but after pondering this for a couple of years, I found it to be unconvincing. I am not aware of the Old English language including the sound that comes from the "dge" letter grouping. In short, this seems too modern to me.

Having said that, I am no scholar of Anglo-Saxon. It may be that certain forms from Anglo-Saxon adopted the "dge" sound in what became Middle English (a couple of hundred years after the Norman Conquest). I just don't know.

Dr Nigel
2005-Nov-06, 06:57 PM
I've heard moose bites kan be pretti nasti....

I heard that too. But not as nasty as Llama bites... :)

Gillianren
2005-Nov-06, 08:10 PM
Okay, in honour of the talk with my daughter yesterday (8th birthday!):

Morgan--we really liked the name, and her dad insisted on one that didn't have nicknames. Her adoptive mom and I went through a lot of baby name books looking for ones we could all agree on. It's Welsh for sea-dweller, and in fact they have a boat. (How many 8-year-olds do you know who know port from starboard?)

Wylie--her adoptive mom's grandmother's maiden name. Can't Google to find out what it means, because there seems to have been an etymologist by the name of Wylie, and he's taking up all the results.

Carter-Douglas--her adoptive parents' names. Carter, obviously, would be one who drove a cart. Douglas is a Scots name of apparently disputed definition, at least according to the sites Google's showing me. (Except, once more, an etymologist with the name.)

The Mangler
2005-Nov-06, 10:01 PM
...because there seems to have been an etymologist by the name of Wylie, and he's taking up all the results...

Check here: Online Etymology Dictionary (http://www.etymonline.com/) It includes a lot of names.

TheBlackCat
2005-Nov-07, 02:50 AM
Wiley (http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=wiley).

From a surname which was derived either from a place name meaning "temple clearing" in Old English or from a nickname meaning "wily, tricky" in Middle English.
Not exactly the same, but the closest I could find.

cran
2005-Nov-07, 06:16 AM
Gillianren - Carter, obviously, would be one who drove a cart. Not necessarily ... my rather dusty and unreliable memory immediately responded with "Carter - derived from 'chartmaker' or mapmaker - from whence we get cartographer" - it might be having a lend of me (does that sometimes) :think: but other times it can be pretty close ... :neutral:

Dave Mitsky
2005-Nov-07, 01:38 PM
Your name is "Six and Seven-eighths"???

It could just as well be rabbit.

Dave Mitsky

dakini
2005-Nov-07, 02:14 PM
I got my name (Sarah) because my parents are unoriginal and picked the second most popular girl's name in north america. I'm named after the lady in the bible.
My name means princess in hebrew... in case someone didn't know that.

Gillianren
2005-Nov-07, 07:28 PM
Not necessarily ... my rather dusty and unreliable memory immediately responded with "Carter - derived from 'chartmaker' or mapmaker - from whence we get cartographer" - it might be having a lend of me (does that sometimes) :think: but other times it can be pretty close ... :neutral:

Well, that's true. I just read Pillars of the Earth, though, and all that stone for the cathedral's hauled by carters.

cran
2005-Nov-07, 11:04 PM
Good point, Gillian,
I guess that's why some people make a living out tracking down the origins of people's names ... :D
and because of the incredibly multicultural influences that go into our modern languages, that's why some names have more than one, often unrelated, meanings ... :confused::o