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View Full Version : OK, I'm miffed...



AGN Fuel
2005-Nov-09, 06:33 AM
My wife came home from doing the grocery shopping and found that some low-life had broken into the house and ransacked it.

The jewellery, the cameras, the CDs & DVDs (including 4 'Spacecraft Film' DVDs :() are replaceable. But someone please tell me - just how pathetic must you have to be to steal an 8-year old girl's Jewel Box from what is very clearly a little girl's room? An 8 year old.

It is hard for me to imagine a lower act than this.

Candy
2005-Nov-09, 06:50 AM
I'm sorry for you and your family to have to go through something like this. It's a horrible experience. We often think of our homes as a santuary. Too often, they are not. :(

Enzp
2005-Nov-09, 07:24 AM
I sympathize. My home was broken into by some area yutes, and I never felt the same in my home. They took a bunch of stupid things, including a fire extinguisher, emptied drawers on the floor. I felt somehow soiled. For a long time I bordered on OC checking and rechecking the locks as I left the house. I hope you get over it in good shape.

Once my sister left her home for a few days to visit family, and when they returned, the house was empty. Literally, no furniture, no nothing. I guess she was fortunate in that she had taken her dog with her. It took her a long time to get over that.

Swift
2005-Nov-09, 02:22 PM
That really stinks, especially about taking your daughter's stuff.

Doodler
2005-Nov-09, 02:36 PM
If it had any possible value, then it was just another valuable in the loot bag. I mean, really, why on Earth would you think someone breaking into a house and stealing stuff would possess the presence of mind to say "hmm, this looks like it belongs to a kid, maybe I shouldn't traumatize her and just steal the adult stuff?"

:think:

Moose
2005-Nov-09, 02:49 PM
AGN, I feel for you. Getting robbed is no fun at all. I only vaguely remember when our house had been burglarized twice within six months when I was a kid, but it apparently was one of the major factors in them deciding to move the family to where it is now.

Damburger
2005-Nov-09, 03:39 PM
Housebreakers are worse than other kinds of theives, because its not just about taking property, its about violating you. Some people simply feel no empathy for their fellow man, and will traumatise a child without a second thought if it gets them a small amount of cash.

I'd best not express my feelings about such people if I want to stay on the forum.

Doodler
2005-Nov-09, 04:44 PM
You guys do realize more than just kids are traumatized by crimes committed against them?

Call me heartless, but my outrage meter doesn't flicker much when someone tells me "think of the children" in cases like this, the needle's pretty much capped out over the incident to begin with. I think its ageist to dismiss or minimize the trauma done to adults in cases like these. After all, many of them are just as shocked and scarred by the violation as any child. Think me wrong, take a good look at any woman who's ever been violated. Adults scar just as badly as kids do.

ALL OF US should have our innocence mourned in losses like these. Additional hystrionics over a victim's age are pointless escalations of already bad circumstances. Whether a child is a victim or not, the fundamental fact remains that NONE of them should have been victims in the first place, no matter how old they are. I find it offensive that anyone would think less of a victim's suffering because they happen to be adults. That's pretty ill.

In any event, here's hoping for some solid evidence left behind and good homeowner's insurance. Even jewelry boxes are replaceable.

Damburger
2005-Nov-09, 04:51 PM
You guys do realize more than just kids are traumatized by crimes committed against them?

Call me heartless, but my outrage meter doesn't flicker much when someone tells me "think of the children" in cases like this, the needle's pretty much capped out over the incident to begin with. I think its ageist to dismiss or minimize the trauma done to adults in cases like these. After all, many of them are just as shocked and scarred by the violation as any child. Think me wrong, take a good look at any woman who's ever been violated. Adults scar just as badly as kids do.


Can't speak for the rest but I mentioned children specifically because the OP did. And it is entirely correct for our society to feel more outrage at the violation of a child than at the violation of an adult. Human reproductive strategy involves spending a lot of energy on protecting our offspring, and our society reflects that.

Big Brother Dunk
2005-Nov-09, 06:17 PM
That's a tough break for you. I hope everything works out for you.

Moose
2005-Nov-09, 06:30 PM
After all, many of them are just as shocked and scarred by the violation as any child. Think me wrong, take a good look at any woman who's ever been violated. Adults scar just as badly as kids do.

I would suggest that in some circumstances (especially home invasion where the burglar isn't seen), adults can be traumatized far worse than children can.

My folks were far more traumatized by the two robberies we'd suffered (we were home, asleep) than I was. I was a bit too young (at five or six) to understand the implications of what had happened. I knew we'd been robbed, but that's as far as my understanding went. I'd gotten over it very quickly. At no point did I not feel perfectly safe while at home.

Same story when my aunt was robbed. She immediately went out and bought a monitored house alarm and became much more proactive about keeping an eye out for strangers, while her son (about three) seems to have been completely oblivious to the situation.

I have to say I'm still a little agog at (and somewhat in awe over) what happened to Enzp's sister.

Tunga
2005-Nov-09, 08:06 PM
Just wondering if the theft of the child's jewelry box might be a small clue to the identity of the burgular. Perhaps he had a daughter at home and this caught his eye.

Swift
2005-Nov-09, 08:38 PM
Just wondering if the theft of the child's jewelry box might be a small clue to the identity of the burgular. Perhaps he had a daughter at home and this caught his eye.
I might modify a widely used quote around BAUT... "Never attribute to thought, what could equally be attributed to malice" ;)

Josh
2005-Nov-09, 09:25 PM
My Grandmother's home was broken into a few weeks ago. She wasn't so concerned with the TV going, the Jewellery, the other normal valuables. What she's most upset about is the five dollars and a shopping list that was left in the pocket of my grandfathers pants from the day he died. Why take a shopping list?? She feels like he's been taken away all over again.

You'd think there'd be some sort of burglars code of ethics that would stop them taking things that are obviously more about sentimental value. Well I would think ...

Gillianren
2005-Nov-09, 09:40 PM
My sister once had her house burgled on Christmas Eve. It was in Tacoma; she was home in California with the family. She's pretty sure it was a former roommate, but, yes, a lot of irreplaceable stuff was taken.

TheBlackCat
2005-Nov-09, 10:10 PM
Thats awful, I'm really sorry AGN. Our houses have been pretty lucky, we have always had alarms so we never really had much trouble. However, our first boat was robbed. They stole all the electronics, ripped them right out of the center console. My dad bought an alarm for our next boat, and he still takes all the electronics off our current boat when he leaves. My dad used to be a cop, so I guess he is sort of paranoid about that sort of thing. I have three pepper sprays scatterd around my aparment, and I am required to carry another one with me at all times.

Musashi
2005-Nov-09, 10:14 PM
My condolences AGN. If it makes you feel any better, your post helped inspire me to upgrade the security of my front door. It is right next to a window and the inner part of the deadbolt was a simple lever that, if the window were broken, could be operated from the outside. I replaced it with a deadbolt that takes a key on both sides. One small step.

Van Rijn
2005-Nov-09, 10:37 PM
My condolences AGN. If it makes you feel any better, your post helped inspire me to upgrade the security of my front door. It is right next to a window and the inner part of the deadbolt was a simple lever that, if the window were broken, could be operated from the outside. I replaced it with a deadbolt that takes a key on both sides. One small step.

My condolences also. This is always painful. I shouldn't say it, but it hasn't happened to me for quite some time. It always hurts when it happens, especially when they take something of sentimental value.

On the deadbolt: When you are in the house, you should have the key in the lock. In case there is a fire, you don't want to make it impossible to get out that door. I have glass next to the front door as well. I had a piece of thick plexiglass cut to size, and custom fitted it. On the outside there is still glass, but there is an air gap and then the layer of plexiglass. It provides some insulation value, and if someone tries to bash in the glass they'll get a rude surprise.

AGN Fuel
2005-Nov-09, 10:42 PM
Thank you for your thoughts, folks. I do appreciate it.


If it had any possible value, then it was just another valuable in the loot bag. I mean, really, why on Earth would you think someone breaking into a house and stealing stuff would possess the presence of mind to say "hmm, this looks like it belongs to a kid, maybe I shouldn't traumatize her and just steal the adult stuff?"

:think:

I should have been clearer in the OP - the 'Jewel Box' taken was a rather cheap pink box with a little ballerina on top - i.e. very clearly something that belonged to a young girl. She leaves (left) it open on her dresser, and even a cursory glance at it would have shown the contents to be $2 beads, chains, coloured stones collected on holidays, etc. In other words - absolutely nothing of any value whatsoever except to little girl to whom it belonged.

I have no doubt whatsoever that whoever did this didn't give a fig for whether or not the kids were traumatized (after all, of the 50-odd DVDs we lost, probably a quarter were kids movies). However, I would have thought that even this loser could work out that the blackmarket resale value of plastic rings is probably low. This was just an act of *******ry.

Hugh Jass
2005-Nov-10, 02:30 AM
Maybe keep an eye on ebay for one person that happens to be selling all those DVDs. It's a long shot, but something. I THINK there are ways of traking people back down through ebay if you can show they are selling stollen goods.

My heart goes out to you and yours. I know if I was in your situation I'd be wanting to hunt them down.

AGN Fuel
2005-Nov-10, 02:52 AM
Maybe keep an eye on ebay for one person that happens to be selling all those DVDs. It's a long shot, but something. I THINK there are ways of traking people back down through ebay if you can show they are selling stollen goods.

My heart goes out to you and yours. I know if I was in your situation I'd be wanting to hunt them down.

Thanks man - that's a good call. I had checked out the local pawn shops/cash converters/DVD exchanges, but I forgot about eBay.

I'll check it out. Thanks again!

LurchGS
2005-Nov-13, 12:48 AM
AGN, serious bummer!

I've been fortuntate to have never been burgled (Unless you count the time one of my boy's friends came into the house while we were gone and took some PS2 games).

If you live in an urban area, get a neighborhood watch going. Even if you are not friendly with your neighbors (I'm NOT gregarious, and I don't even know my neighbors names), if everybody keeps an eye on the neighborhood, strangers will stand out.
We rarely bother to lock our door, unless we are going to be gone for hours.

Also, if you are not allergic, dogs are really good deterrents. Any size works, though I admit I have a personal preference for larger dogs. Fewer things are percieved threats to them.

If you really feel the need, a monitored alarm system is rarely a bad investment, especially if it includes fire and hazardous gasses. Do a lot of research before you choose one, though - they vary widely in their responses and response times.

Huge - good call on e-bay. There ARE ways to trace people back, but I think you need to get the police involved, etc. it's even more fun if they want to use PayPal.

AGN, much as I hate to say it, you should consider whether you or any member of your family has done something to make somebody mad. The taking of your daughter's jewelry box sounds an awful lot like it was motivated by spite. Generally, burglars have a pretty good eye for what's worth taking, and they have limited carrying capacity. They are unlikely to waste the time or the energy it would take to even *investigate* a small child's room.

In addition to e-bay, take a look at any local flea-markets, if such exist (we have a rather large one here)

Best of luck!

Jeff Root
2005-Nov-13, 01:29 AM
> Generally, burglars have a pretty good eye for what's worth taking

And there are some really, really stupid burglars.

Someone got into my apartment building-- I don't remember if
this happened before locks were put on the outside doors-- then
did an impressive job on the locked, steel laundry room door to
reach the washer and dryer. They did an even more impressive
job peeling open the heavy steel box built into the washer which
collects payment. It must have been quite an effort, and rather
dissappointing to find the box filled with nothing but broken
plastic tokens.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis

montebianco
2005-Nov-13, 01:33 AM
Someone got into my apartment building-- I don't remember if
this happened before locks were put on the outside doors-- then
did an impressive job on the locked, steel laundry room door to
reach the washer and dryer. They did an even more impressive
job peeling open the heavy steel box built into the washer which
collects payment. It must have been quite an effort, and rather
dissappointing to find the box filled with nothing but broken
plastic tokens.

Long, long time ago, but someone in the building I lived in at that time discovered that it was possible to pop the coins in the slots and push the slide back a very precise distance, nearly all the way but not quite, the machines would start, but the coins would not drop into the box, but come back out as the slide returned to the default position...

Hugh Jass
2005-Nov-13, 08:13 AM
Thanks man...

Man?!?! Are you really from NSW? :lol: I thought mate was the proper term.;)

Anyway I have been lucky in my life as far as holding on to my possessions, except when I was explaining to my wife about this post I remembered something that would, might get sympathy at least in this board. When I was 8 we were living "in transition" between towns and my parents were just trying to save some money since we were only going to be in this one spot for a few months, it was a small apartment they could pay month to month, in a nasty area. Anyway they went on a vacation for two weeks and my brothers and I were at my grandparents. Someone broke into our garage, which was holding most of our boxed up possessions we didn't have room in this crappy little apartment to unpack, including quite a few personal belongings of my own. Well they weren't able to open the garage very far and were really only able to take what they could squeeze out of the boxes in the first row nearest the door, which happend to be my ENTIRE collection of starwars toys. And it was a good one.

AGN I feel for your daughter. I still remember how I felt then. Really it was a different thing. I knew we were just passing through, but every memory I have of that place, the apartment, the neighborhood, the town, that whole summer, just brings out anger. I'm actually getting angry again typing about it. I was never scared, didn't feel violated, though I think my parents did (there were a few other things taken, but I don't have any memory of that, my starwars c'mon) just anger. I know as adults we feel violated, victimized, and often think children feel the same thing, or just confused. Even young children undersand a lot more than many give them credit for, but their feelings are just different.

Wish you well in trying to get back to normal.

LurchGS
2005-Nov-18, 06:49 AM
Man?!?! Are you really from NSW? :lol: I thought mate was the proper term.;)

Anyway I have been lucky in my life as far as holding on to my possessions, except when I was explaining to my wife about this post I remembered something that would, might get sympathy at least in this board. When I was 8 we were living "in transition" between towns and my parents were just trying to save some money since we were only going to be in this one spot for a few months, it was a small apartment they could pay month to month, in a nasty area.

On the other side of the coin (and I'm not trying to upset people), I spent a year or so living in a deplorable neighborhood - south side of Chicago. I was a single college student - and did what most college guys my age did - amassed a goodly collection of stereo gear and records (yeah, vinyl). I lived in a 6 story apartment building with next to nothing for locks.
Not to put too fine a point on it, I stood out like a flashlight in a cave.

My neighbors certainly knew what I had, so I imagine everybody within a block knewI *never* had anything stolen, nor did I have my apartment broken into. (I had a robery attempt on the EL once, but that doesn't count).

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if Only I knew now what I used to know then

farmerjumperdon
2005-Nov-18, 03:24 PM
I've had a couple things ripped off and it is a very uncomfortable thing - the whole feeling of having your space and belongings violated. What I worry about most are my photos. I've kind of become the family histographer(?).

Anyway, I've inherited all these amazing old pictures and would just freak out if they ever were lost. So I'm on a campaign to get them all scanned and stored, with duplicate back-ups. What a task, but oh so cool rummaging thru them.

Candy
2005-Nov-18, 07:37 PM
Anyway, I've inherited all these amazing old pictures and would just freak out if they ever were lost. So I'm on a campaign to get them all scanned and stored, with duplicate back-ups. What a task, but oh so cool rummaging thru them.
That's neat. I've got some that I want scanned, too. My family keeps sending me all these old photo's of myself. I like some of them. I'll send them over to you farmerjumperdon. ;)

farmerjumperdon
2005-Nov-18, 08:57 PM
I've got it down to an assembly line process. In about 4 hours over the last 2 evenings I've probably scanned about 150 pictures and organized them into folders. I'm about a quarter of the way through, but I think I'll create some discs now before my machine hiccups and sends me into a maddened rage. It always seems to do that at the most inopportune time.

One thing I would advise people of: Label and document while someone is still around you remembers who people are. Very few of the snapshots I have are dated (though nowadays most equipment does that for you). I've also got a whole pile in which I can't identify all or some of the people. I've got this awesome 11X14 of a family wedding group photo from the late 40's, and I have no idea who about 8 or 10 of the 50 people are. I'll have to try and run them by my 2 surviving aunts, but their memories are failing. If you're the sentimental type, make sure to capture each generations memories before the people are gone.

LurchGS
2005-Nov-19, 12:50 AM
I've got it down to an assembly line process. In about 4 hours over the last 2 evenings I've probably scanned about 150 pictures and organized them into folders. I'm about a quarter of the way through, but I think I'll create some discs now before my machine hiccups and sends me into a maddened rage. It always seems to do that at the most inopportune time.

One thing I would advise people of: Label and document while someone is still around you remembers who people are. Very few of the snapshots I have are dated (though nowadays most equipment does that for you). I've also got a whole pile in which I can't identify all or some of the people. I've got this awesome 11X14 of a family wedding group photo from the late 40's, and I have no idea who about 8 or 10 of the 50 people are. I'll have to try and run them by my 2 surviving aunts, but their memories are failing. If you're the sentimental type, make sure to capture each generations memories before the people are gone.

Nothing snipped-

You should come over and help my mother - she's been at it for ..4 years now, I think. Maybe longer. We have a LOT of photos. Well, she and Dad do - I've already done most of mine (one of the benefits of being a geek, I guess)

Now I'm in the middle of porting all my video tapes to VCD or DVD - family tapes first, of course, but also irreplaceable shows - MST3K and the like (yes, I know I can get many of them online.. but not anywhere near all of them)

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Where's MagicVoice when you need her?