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wayneee
2005-Nov-26, 06:18 AM
:rolleyes: :rolleyes: in the spirit of you know your a red neck if .... when you help your richest family member move, then take the wheels off his new home, then your probably a red neck.

if you ever told a date, that your phaser are on stun... then your probably a nerd

SolusLupus
2005-Nov-26, 06:21 AM
If you ever pondered just a bit too long on that nymph chick your charcter ran into in a D&D campaign... you're probably a nerd.

Okay, edited

Van Rijn
2005-Nov-26, 06:30 AM
Generally, "nerd" is considered to be less preferred than "geek." A nerd is socially inept. A geek just doesn't care but can play the game if he really has to.

Enzp
2005-Nov-26, 07:39 AM
If you feel the need to make distinctions like that, you just might be one.

If someone mixes a Star Trek and a Star Wars reference and you take them to task or correct them, you might be one.

If you still own a slide rule, you are definitely one.

Gillianren
2005-Nov-26, 09:03 AM
. . . If you know that an ellipsis (see the beginning of this sentence for an example) only has three periods in it. And what it's called.

SolusLupus
2005-Nov-26, 09:08 AM
Only has three periods in it, AND a space between each period. But that's an English Major thing, not a geek/nerd thing, I think. English Majors rank lower than a nerd ;P

Egarim
2005-Nov-26, 09:14 AM
You might be a nerd if you've never actually met any of your friends.

If someone asks you if you know any other languages and you say you know C++, Perl, Java etc. you might be a nerd.

You might be a geek if you know what 31337 stands for.

You might be a nerd if you understand and think "There's no place like 127.0.0.1, there's no place like 127.0.0.1" is funny.

SolusLupus
2005-Nov-26, 04:52 PM
I'm a nerd because I haven't met my girlfriend IRL yet, and she's also in Singapore =P

Arneb
2005-Nov-26, 05:07 PM
...you know when you've never even once been

ToSeeked! (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=20108) :shifty:

Robert Andersson
2005-Nov-26, 11:27 PM
You might be a nerd if you understand and think "There's no place like 127.0.0.1, there's no place like 127.0.0.1" is funny.
That one *is* funny. Guess I'm a nerd then... (ouch! the ellipsis thingie too)

Jorge
2005-Nov-27, 12:40 AM
You might be a nerd if you've never actually met any of your friends.


Well i got more friends online that offline, so only half... met one of them though when i was in spain.



If someone asks you if you know any other languages and you say you know C++, Perl, Java etc. you might be a nerd.

Well i've anserd php, xhtmk, javascript, vb.net, perl, delphi and vbs to that once



You might be a nerd if you understand and think "There's no place like 127.0.0.1, there's no place like 127.0.0.1" is funny.

Ouch i do but i prefur 192.168.2.4... i can go home from any network pc... much more convient.

LurchGS
2005-Nov-27, 01:02 AM
if you find "there are 10 types of people in the world, those who understand binary and those who don't" funny

(more languages: Python, Dragon)

Dragon Star
2005-Nov-27, 01:11 AM
(more languages: Python, Dragon)

:doh::shifty:

turbo-1
2005-Nov-27, 01:16 AM
If you still own a slide rule, you are definitely one.In engineering school in 1970, calculators were $300 items (Bomar) that had the four basic arithmetic functions. The school thought that less affluent students should not suffer the disadvantage posed by the lack of technology, so calculators were banned, and we all had to use slide rules. I could not possibly have afforded a calculator at the time, so that was just as well. Believe me, I ditched that old K+E as soon as calculators got cheap enough to come into common use. Still got an old HP RPN programmable calculator hanging around here - got to find it and play Moon Lander. Never played? You may still be a geek, but probably not a middle-aged geek.

LurchGS
2005-Nov-27, 01:22 AM
In engineering school in 1970, calculators were $300 items (Bomar) that had the four basic arithmetic functions. The school thought that less affluent students should not suffer the disadvantage posed by the lack of technology, so calculators were banned, and we all had to use slide rules. I could not possibly have afforded a calculator at the time, so that was just as well. Believe me, I ditched that old K+E as soon as calculators got cheap enough to come into common use. Still got an old HP RPN programmable calculator hanging around here - got to find it and play Moon Lander. Never played? You may still be a geek, but probably not a middle-aged geek.

Ditto for 1977 - but Dad made me learn to use a slipstick when I was in gradeschool. Then, for Highschool graduation, gave me an HP RPN programable calculator (and yes, I did play moon lander on it)

This conversation almost makes me wish I'd not been booted from school

Gullible Jones
2005-Nov-27, 02:49 AM
If you get freaked out when Linspire boots up into a graphical root environment, you just might be a geek!

Gillianren
2005-Nov-27, 02:57 AM
My distinction has always been geek=science and nerd=liberal arts. The fact that I have put this much thought into it definitely makes me a nerd.

Moose
2005-Nov-27, 03:15 AM
... when you notice all the strings of lights decorating the department christmas party come in all the traditional lightsaber colors (blue, green, yellow, violet, and red).

True story, I'm afraid.

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2005-Nov-27, 03:19 AM
When you Ask your Girlfriend, To Give you, The Captain Kirk Special ...

And she Understands ...

And, DOES It!!!!

:dance:

Van Rijn
2005-Nov-27, 03:23 AM
Ditto for 1977 - but Dad made me learn to use a slipstick when I was in gradeschool. Then, for Highschool graduation, gave me an HP RPN programable calculator (and yes, I did play moon lander on it)


Heh. I still have three slipsticks sitting around somewhere, two were my father's, one mine. I haven't touched them in ages. In truth, I didn't have the chance to become that good with the sliderule before it became obsolete - I got my first calculator (a four function) when I was around 12.

You know you are a geek if you can remember when you got your first calculator, your first scientific calculator (~1976, TI-30 (http://www.vintagecalculators.com/html/texas_instruments_ti-30.html)) and your first programmable calculator (1978, TI-59 (http://www.ti59.com/)). I was in heaven when I got my TI-30, and I spent far too many hours writing programs for the TI-59. I ended up wearing out the mag-card reader all too soon ...

aurora
2005-Nov-27, 03:57 AM
If you carry a GPS and a PDA around with you everywhere. And if you know how to program a PDA.

If everyone looks at you whenever a person in a group asks a question about the current location, exact time, or the time a particular star will rise or set tonight.

SolusLupus
2005-Nov-27, 04:13 AM
When you Ask your Girlfriend, To Give you, The Captain Kirk Special ...

Yes, that's a geekish/nerdish thing.


And she Understands ...

And, DOES It!!!!

:dance:

No, this is just a Nerd's fantasy come true. Which, actually, can make them somewhat less of a nerd o_O Having a girlfriend in the first place helps that.

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2005-Nov-27, 04:19 AM
Yes, that's a geekish/nerdish thing.



No, this is just a Nerd's fantasy come true. Which, actually, can make them somewhat less of a nerd o_O Having a girlfriend in the first place helps that.
True ....

So, Where Do I Get, The Green Body Paint, anyway?

:shhh:

crosscountry
2005-Nov-27, 04:23 AM
I don't like this game.


I prefer to call those people dweebs and nerds.


being a nerd myself I have to stand up for us. NERDS UNITE!!!

crosscountry
2005-Nov-27, 04:24 AM
Generally, "nerd" is considered to be less preferred than "geek." A nerd is socially inept. A geek just doesn't care but can play the game if he really has to.


disagree. Nerds can still work out and play basketball.:naughty:

geeks and dweebs are the math and computer people that dwell in the computer labs and play video games on the weekends.


nerds go out and have fun but are still smart come Monday.

LurchGS
2005-Nov-27, 04:29 AM
If you carry a GPS and a PDA around with you everywhere. And if you know how to program a PDA.

If everyone looks at you whenever a person in a group asks a question about the current location, exact time, or the time a particular star will rise or set tonight.

what are you if you carry two phones (one GPS), a pager, a pda, a laptop, a VHF radio and a multitool? oh, and an old Parker fountain pen with green ink

Dragon Star
2005-Nov-27, 05:25 AM
what are you if you carry two phones (one GPS), a pager, a pda, a laptop, a VHF radio and a multitool? oh, and an old Parker fountain pen with green ink

:eh: Nope, you don't qualify...sorry.:lol:

hippietrekx
2005-Nov-27, 06:09 AM
... when you notice all the strings of lights decorating the department christmas party come in all the traditional lightsaber colors (blue, green, yellow, violet, and red).

True story, I'm afraid.

Actually, there are NO yellow light sabers, though blasters come in the colors above plus orange. (I know this because I stayed up for over 27 hours to watch all six episodes in story-order for 14 hours 17 minutes, and watched for things like that, including Luke's changing saber color from blue to green to blue to green to... {he has two, really. Found out in episode six in a passing comment by Vader})

^Spotting that makes me a dweeb/dork/nerd/geek/socially inept monster/outcast/freak/whatever :shhh:

You're a geek when...

... you run your own website. Your own comic book website.

... you've made your own slime like that in Ghostbusters.

... you can write essays for English on the political relevance and relation to America's political climate in Star Trek. (I got a 99%. Missed a comma. Darn those little buggers, anyway...)

... you go to international science fair competions and the best part of the trip was meeting that one scientist who guest starred on Nova!

--hipster, the eternally geeky

P.S. ...you have a shirt that says, "Geek: It's a tough job, but someone has to to it," which you wear in public. Where people see you.

Gemini
2005-Nov-27, 06:20 AM
...Or If you are nervous when you are wearing red.

TheBlackCat
2005-Nov-27, 07:16 AM
When your TI-89 graphing calculator is more important to you than your pen or pencil in class.

When you know what a slide rule actually is and what it is used for

When every electronic appliance in your living room is networked together

When you have a bookshelf entirely devoted to books on computer software

When you have more than one book completely devoted to mathematical constants

When you use pencils all the time but can't remember the last time you sharpened one.

When you have a large drawer completely devoted to pieces of dissected electronics equipment

When your parents save their broken electronics so you can dissect them

When you store the phone numbers of your friends and family on your watch

When you know so much about comics or books you have never read that experts in the series think you are a loyal fan. Could also apply to movies or TV shows

When you own comics adaptations that rabid comic book fans didn't even know existed

When you routinely use more than computer 2 operating systems

Candy
2005-Nov-27, 07:45 AM
disagree. Nerds can still work out and play basketball.:naughty:

geeks and dweebs are the math and computer people that dwell in the computer labs and play video games on the weekends.


nerds go out and have fun but are still smart come Monday.
What am I?

It's Saturday night, and I'm at home watching Columbo Goes to College. I'll go to sleep soon. This is the norm for the last 9 years.

All my current friends are my online BAUT buddies.

cjl
2005-Nov-27, 07:53 AM
when your TI-89 graphing calculator is more important to you than your pen or pencil in class
Guilty


when you have a bookshelf entirely devoted to books on computer software
Guilty


when your parents save their broken electronics so you can dissect them
Guilty


when you have more than one book completely devoted to mathematical constraints
Guilty


when you have a large drawer completely devoted to pieces of dissected electronics equipment
Guilty


when you store the phone numbers of your friends and family on your watch
Guilty


when you routinely use more than 2 computer operating systems
Guilty


How about:
when you are not embarrased to be seen in public wearing a shirt that says "Actually, as a matter of fact, I AM a rocket scientist" (Guilty)

LurchGS
2005-Nov-27, 08:06 AM
When every electronic appliance in your living room is networked together



wimp - you need to network every electronic applilance in the house. (well, except the microwave and 'fridge - but She Who Must Be Obeyed put the kabosh on that)




When you have a bookshelf entirely devoted to books on computer software


bookshelf or bookcase.. I'll see if I can take a photo of the computer book collection...



When you have more than one book completely devoted to mathematical constants


ok. I have to check on that - I think it's only one...



When you use pencils all the time but can't remember the last time you sharpened one.


what's a pencil?



When you have a large drawer completely devoted to pieces of dissected electronics equipment



Let me introduce you to my garage...



When your parents save their broken electronics so you can dissect them



Well, being the parent, I get to do the giving. My youngest son's room looks like an explosion at Apple. Oddly, most of the stuff works.

he frightens me sometimes



When you store the phone numbers of your friends and family on your watch

hah! what sane nerd/geek wears a watch? Every computer has a clock, every microwave has a clock. most cars have clocks. Pdas have clocks. watches are for telling you how much air you have in your tank.



When you know so much about comics or books you have never read that experts in the series think you are a loyal fan. Could also apply to movies or TV shows


you betcha!



When you own comics adaptations that rabid comic book fans didn't even know existed

To be honest, aside from the first three Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comics, i've nothing. I'd LOVE a set of Bun-Buns though


When you routinely use more than computer 2 operating systems

variations in flavor don't count, either, though I think Mac OS X is sufficiently different from OS X to qualify as two. Windows is windows is windows. Linux is Linux...

I also know the three local pizza parlor phone numbers by heart

I know Dr Sagan was wrong in his estimation of human habital planets (well, 'know' is too strong a word, but his logic is flawed)

Dogs think I'm god, but small children scream in panic (ok, maybe this isn't a measure of geekness)

All three toilets in the house leak. I have the parts to fix them. I have the know-how. But the parts have been sitting on my workbench for at least 3 months

I know what wellstone is

Moose
2005-Nov-27, 02:33 PM
Actually, there are NO yellow light sabers, though blasters come in the colors above plus orange. (I know this because I stayed up for over 27 hours to watch all six episodes in story-order for 14 hours 17 minutes, and watched for things like that, including Luke's changing saber color from blue to green to blue to green to... {he has two, really. Found out in episode six in a passing comment by Vader})

Extended universe, actually. Star Wars: Revelations and both KotORs for source material. Yellow is considered one of the traditionals. Curiously enough, Mace Windu's purple was not traditional. (Nor was Anakin's cyan, for that matter.)

Rumor has it (and this, IIRC, draws from the RPG) that Mace Windu's preferred fighting style Juyo/Ferocity borrows from Sith forms.

genebujold
2005-Nov-27, 04:29 PM
hah! what sane nerd/geek wears a watch? Every computer has a clock, every microwave has a clock. most cars have clocks. Pdas have clocks. watches are for telling you how much air you have in your tank.

And the current pressure altitude, the temperature, and a rough (+/- 5 degrees) magnetic heading!

When it's calibrated with a correct altitude, it does a fair job of rendering an altimeter setting, too.

Moose
2005-Nov-27, 04:38 PM
Heck, my 15 year old plain vanilla analog wristwatch serves me well enough as a compass-of-last-resort (+-10 degrees) during daylight hours.

LurchGS
2005-Nov-27, 04:50 PM
And the current pressure altitude, the temperature, and a rough (+/- 5 degrees) magnetic heading!

When it's calibrated with a correct altitude, it does a fair job of rendering an altimeter setting, too.

but...but... that's what the GPS is for...

Donnie B.
2005-Nov-27, 09:57 PM
You know you're a geek when you question the qualifications of anyone claiming geekness on the basis of computer languages who doesn't list at least one assembly language.

Jorge
2005-Nov-27, 11:03 PM
(more languages: Python, Dragon)

Ruby is one too, i supose you can consider shell scripts and batch a language too.


... you run your own website. Your own comic book website.

Well not about comic books but with some how to's for Apache HTTPD Server, Photoshop tutorials and a PHP Image Gallery script and other stuff.

---

I cary a PDA with me 90% of the time too... Pocket Stars is on there so i can check when i'm on vacation.

More your a geek when:
- Knowing what 101 stands for counts as being geek too.
- When a program doesn't do what you want, you write your own (hey i done that a few times)
- Knowing how to write a network application
- Learning how to hack a computer network so you can lockdown your own.
- Having the only secure Wifi in the street

Jorge
2005-Nov-28, 11:42 PM
Knowing with the funny stuff in my signiture is :)
I wonder if anyone here can read it?

Robert Andersson
2005-Nov-29, 12:01 AM
Knowing with the funny stuff in my signiture is :)
I wonder if anyone here can read it?
It's your geek code (http//www.geekcode.com/) right? I'd almost forgotten about that thing.

Those who wants to know Jorge's geeky secrets can translate it here (http://www.kluge.net/ungeek.html) ;)

genebujold
2005-Nov-29, 12:46 AM
Heck, my 15 year old plain vanilla analog wristwatch serves me well enough as a compass-of-last-resort (+-10 degrees) during daylight hours.

Yes, and that's a neat trick! Sssh! Secret pilot stuff!

Moose
2005-Nov-29, 01:38 AM
Hate to break it to you, Gene, but it's an open secret in the Canadian Cub Scouts, where I learned it.

For kicks in scouts, I've competed against my partner patrol and a venturer group on a pioneering course using only analogs. No compasses. It took some educated guesses, fair pacing, and a bit of luck to keep us close enough on course to find each marker. My patrol finished second after the more experienced venturer patrol.

Josh
2005-Nov-29, 02:25 AM
... when you're a moderator on a space and astronomy web forum?

wayneee
2005-Nov-29, 03:38 AM
If you waited for two months for the Fourth Book in the Covenant Series and threw the book out the window and refused to eat for two days after getting to chapter 4. (Retrieved book ten minutes later, but yelled explatives at it for a few hours ) Finished reading it , and waited for book 5

genebujold
2005-Nov-29, 03:41 AM
Hate to break it to you, Gene, but it's an open secret in the Canadian Cub Scouts, where I learned it.

For kicks in scouts, I've competed against my partner patrol and a venturer group on a pioneering course using only analogs. No compasses. It took some educated guesses, fair pacing, and a bit of luck to keep us close enough on course to find each marker. My patrol finished second after the more experienced venturer patrol.

Yeah, well, I spent my earlier years (pre-military) hiking the backcountry armed with nothing more than a topo and a compass. And I'm not talking about weekend hikes, but 5+ week hikes of places like the Desolation Wilderness Area east of Lake Tahoe.

In January.

crosscountry
2005-Nov-29, 05:16 AM
when you spend more time reading this site than studying/working


your SO (significant other) gets mad because of all that time on here.

LurchGS
2005-Nov-29, 06:15 AM
... you know the difference between "you're" and "your"

... you have more than one DVD player - more than two if you count computers

... you know that pizza and caffeine are the two primary food groups

TheBlackCat
2005-Nov-29, 07:06 AM
... you have more than one DVD player - more than two if you count computers

I'm guilty of this one (2, 4 including computers). My parents have 4 DVD players, 2 single-disc players and 2 5-disc changers (8 total including computers). My sister also has 2 including her computer. That makes 14 DVD players in our family.

Edit: forgot to mention that this includes 2 DVD burners and 3 VCR/DVD players.

LurchGS
2005-Nov-29, 07:10 AM
I'm guilty of this one (2, 4 including computers). My parents have 4 DVD players, 2 single-disc players and 2 5-disc changers (8 total including computers). My sister also has 2 including her computer. That makes 14 DVD players in our family.

LOL,that's more than we have... sisters: 1 each (total, 3), parents:3, me: 5

Donnie B.
2005-Nov-29, 03:49 PM
Do multi-disc players count as one or five? ;)

crosscountry
2005-Nov-29, 03:56 PM
five.




.... if you check the weather on your cell phone.

Van Rijn
2005-Nov-29, 10:25 PM
Do multi-disc players count as one or five? ;)

Or 301? (And the disks in the machine cost substantially more than the machine itself.)

LurchGS
2005-Nov-29, 10:33 PM
Do multi-disc players count as one or five? ;)


Despite what some of the barbarians on this thread would have you believe, it only counts as one. Even if it can hold 301 - the part that counts is the read head. (or, in my case, the read/write head)

-----

avast, ye heathens! Back, I say!

Jorge
2005-Nov-29, 11:09 PM
It's your geek code (http://http//www.geekcode.com/) right? I'd almost forgotten about that thing.

Those who wants to know Jorge's geeky secrets can translate it here (http://www.kluge.net/ungeek.html) ;)

Indeed it is geek code :)
I used to be able to read it without the need of a translater... although that gift has been lost.

Your a geek when you start laughing outload when you see someone wearing a T with pebkac on it and one get sit and then slwoly backaway from you.

wayneee
2005-Nov-30, 02:29 AM
when you tread in a large pile of bear droppings, and your first initial reaction is not disgust but exhilaration(based on a true story)

Candy
2005-Nov-30, 04:01 AM
I have an HP "something" calculator, first bought in 1984-5, for Purdue Calculas. After the battery ran out, I put it to storage. Apparently, it is a Geek's dream due to the button design. I'll try to dig it out for you "dorks". :p

TheBlackCat
2005-Nov-30, 04:35 AM
Is it a postfix calculator? They don't make them anymore as far as I know so I imagine one would be a collector's item.

Candy
2005-Nov-30, 04:56 AM
Is it a postfix calculator? They don't make them anymore as far as I know so I imagine one would be a collector's item.
So it's worth more than I paid for it (about $70)? :shifty:

crosscountry
2005-Nov-30, 05:35 AM
I got a TI-86 for sale. book and batteries included if you bribe me.

LurchGS
2005-Nov-30, 05:36 AM
...if you know that William Shatner is only 4 days older than Leonard Nimoy

Candy
2005-Nov-30, 05:43 AM
I got a TI-86 for sale. book and batteries included if you bribe me.
So I have hot commodity on my hands? Nice!

crosscountry
2005-Nov-30, 05:54 AM
So I have hot commodity on my hands? Nice!

is that your bribe

http://img61.imageshack.us/img61/2410/naughty4ma.gif

TheBlackCat
2005-Nov-30, 05:59 AM
So it's worth more than I paid for it (about $70)? :shifty:

I have no idea, that would depend on what sort of calculator it is. My post was more of a question than a statement.

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2005-Nov-30, 06:43 AM
...if you know that William Shatner is only 4 days older than Leonard Nimoy
... And, That their BOTH Jewish ....

"You can spin the dreidel, with Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock-ah!"

:whistle:

Van Rijn
2005-Nov-30, 07:10 AM
Is it a postfix calculator? They don't make them anymore as far as I know so I imagine one would be a collector's item.

They still can do RPN, but the new ones (like the HP-49) don't need to. My HP-48GX (which I've had awhile) is RPN. I can do postfix fine, but I never really fell in love with it. So, for variety, I have a TI-89 Titanium.

I don't really need them as much these days, but when you want one, you want one ...

Candy
2005-Nov-30, 09:32 AM
... And, That their BOTH Jewish ....

"You can spin the dreidel, with Captain Kirk and Mr. Spock-ah!"

:whistle:
I thought Shatner was Canadian. ;)

Enzp
2005-Nov-30, 10:12 AM
Funny, he doesn't LOOK Canadian...

Candy
2005-Nov-30, 10:30 AM
Funny, he doesn't LOOK Canadian...
Well, he's lost a lot of "bacon".

Gullible Jones
2005-Nov-30, 09:46 PM
Another one: you just might be a geek if you think an 81 is a really bad grade. :o

Nicolas
2005-Nov-30, 10:05 PM
I just finished a MatLAB simulation that had a nerve pulse function as input, a muscular model (mathematical model that is! :D) as transfer function and as output...

the angle in which a tiny eye muscle is rotated as function fof time.


But ladies and gentlemen, there is a but here!!! I am NOT a geek, because making this simulation was mandatory :o

wayneee
2005-Dec-01, 03:33 AM
You know as I read some of your posts , I am begining to feel rather 'Cool'.
Im a regular Fonzi compared to you folks, or maybe Im simply not a Techno-Nerd. Nerds come in many different shapes and schools. I would say Math is Greek to me , but I understand Greek. (latin actualy)

teri tait
2005-Dec-01, 05:05 AM
Upon hearing the phrase "S & M", you immediately think of science & math.

Halcyon Dayz
2005-Dec-01, 05:13 AM
You are so sick. :)

teri tait
2005-Dec-01, 05:19 AM
You are so sick. :)

That's why I'm here

teri tait
2005-Dec-01, 05:27 AM
Arsenic is just a heavy metal...not a Heavy Metal band

Ilya
2005-Dec-01, 05:34 AM
And Styx is a river and not just the band.

And you are a nerd if you know whose quote it is.

teri tait
2005-Dec-01, 05:34 AM
You have a Stephen Hawkings calendar...

teri tait
2005-Dec-01, 05:54 AM
"She blinded me with science" is your ringtone

teri tait
2005-Dec-01, 06:09 AM
You watch "Jeopardy" and know all the answers...before the contestants

crosscountry
2005-Dec-01, 06:30 AM
Another one: you just might be a geek if you think an 81 is a really bad grade. :o



but it was a good year to be born:)

teri tait
2005-Dec-01, 12:09 PM
You have the "Bill Nye, Science Guy" lost episodes dvd, signed by Bill

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-02, 03:14 AM
You watch "Jeopardy" and know all the answers...before the contestants
Well, you do:) They are shown on the screen before being read to the contestants, so you have several seconds longer than they have to get the question right.

Van Rijn
2005-Dec-02, 03:18 AM
You watch "Jeopardy" and know all the answers...before the contestants

Can't match that one. If it is a science related subject, I can usually clean up, but some of those other subjects ... whew! Strangely enough, contestants that do well on other subjects usually don't do well on science.

Enzp
2005-Dec-02, 07:42 AM
"I'll take 'The Rapists' for $200, Alex."

"That's 'Therapists', Sean."

Harvestar
2005-Dec-02, 08:55 AM
... if you were president of your Quiz Bowl/Academic Challenge/etc. Team

... if you were voted most likely to be on Jeopardy

... you helped plan a Con with your online friends

... you get elated when your Geek Rating goes up

... you're thrilled to be engaged to someone with a higher Geek score

... you consider getting meteorite wedding rings

... you have more than one sword on display at home

... you have a wall of space/astronomy pictures

... upon seeing this site, you immediately start drooling and buy their rodeo jacket (with 52 pockets and a PAN): http://www.scottevest.com/ (my fiance did that - I'm drooling over their cargo pants - it's hard to find flattering looking cargo pants)

tyrie2001
2005-Dec-02, 09:24 AM
... if you use the Star Wars theme tune as background music for your PowerPoint presentation in Chemistry, then at the end have Albert Einstein saying "time for questions" in a Darth Vader voice (as my friend Bart did).


And Styx is a river and not just the band.

And you are a nerd if you know whose quote it is.

Robot Devil. Futurama Episode 4ACV18 The Devil's Hands are Idol Playthings

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-02, 03:37 PM
... if you have bookshelves standing free in the room because you've run out of wall.

Jorge
2005-Dec-02, 11:53 PM
... upon seeing this site, you immediately start drooling and buy their rodeo jacket (with 52 pockets and a PAN): http://www.scottevest.com/ (my fiance did that - I'm drooling over their cargo pants - it's hard to find flattering looking cargo pants)

Man those cargo pants do look sweet.
I never have a place to put my PDA and cellphone in regular pants. (i've torn 3 pockets sofar :/)

hippietrekx
2005-Dec-03, 05:56 AM
When you know so much about comics or books you have never read that experts in the series think you are a loyal fan. Could also apply to movies or TV shows

*waves* I've never so much as seen an X-men comic, or seen the movies. Yet I have a website dedicated almost entiely to the franchise.

--hipster

P.S. Thanks for that info about the lightsabers, Moose. I'm isolated and can't find extended universe stuff... :(

teri tait
2005-Dec-03, 05:44 PM
"Metropolis" is your all time favorite movie

Harvestar
2005-Dec-04, 01:56 AM
... if you have bookshelves standing free in the room because you've run out of wall.

... or if you have a bookshelf in the bathroom since you've run out of room for them elsewhere.

Van Rijn
2005-Dec-04, 03:03 AM
... or if you have a bookshelf in the bathroom since you've run out of room for them elsewhere.

... you identify with the housekeeeping habits of the papermasters in the R.O.D. series, and you found the book burning scene very moving.

... you know what I'm talking about.

hippietrekx
2005-Dec-04, 05:48 AM
"Metropolis" is your all time favorite movie

Maybe not my all-time favorite, but certaintly up there!:D

I especially liked the 1980's re-release with background music by Queen and Pat Benatar (sp?). But that might just make me a dork instead.

Ok... You know you're a geek if you just seven bought knock-off light-up lightsabers dubbed "sound and light swords" from a dollar store. Not for you, but as Christmas gifts for the other seven people who sit at the lunch table.

You know they're geeks if you know at least one of them will exclaim, "I heart you!" when they recieve it... :dance:

--hipster

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2005-Dec-04, 06:04 AM
Maybe not my all-time favorite, but certaintly up there!:D

I especially liked the 1980's re-release with background music by Queen and Pat Benatar (sp?). But that might just make me a dork instead.

Ok... You know you're a geek if you just seven bought knock-off light-up lightsabers dubbed "sound and light swords" from a dollar store. Not for you, but as Christmas gifts for the other seven people who sit at the lunch table.

You know they're geeks if you know at least one of them will exclaim, "I heart you!" when they recieve it... :dance:

--hipster
If you Sit at The Geek Table, By CHOICE ....

:lol:

teri tait
2005-Dec-04, 06:05 AM
Maybe not my all-time favorite, but certaintly up there!:D

I especially liked the 1980's re-release with background music by Queen and Pat Benatar (sp?). But that might just make me a dork instead.

--hipster

OMG! I totally love that version, my dad bought it! It is a timeless classic really...I had to watch it with my dad doing his 'Cliff Clavin' narrative, with my brother rewinding it every 10 minutes just in case I missed some nuance while nodding politely at my Pop's comments!
(He's got tons of Buster Keaton stuff too)

Here's one:

...If you own and operate more than one cell phone per family member...

Teri

teri tait
2005-Dec-04, 06:09 AM
If you Sit at The Geek Table, By CHOICE ....

:lol:


If it wasn't the geek table until YOU sat at it!

TMT

TheBlackCat
2005-Dec-04, 06:14 AM
... you own over $100 worth of contemporary CDs full of music in a language you do not understand, imported from a country you have never been to, with inserts you cannot read (opera does not count)

... when a number of these CD's belong to your favorite artist

... when you have two copies of every song on your hard drive, one for listening to on your computer and other for your personal media player because you have so many songs that they won't all fit unless you reduce the bit rate

... when you have more than four mice connected to the same computer

... when you carry around an electronic dictionary/thesaurus around with you

... when you carry it because you use it all the time

... when you carry it in order to play hangman when you are bored

... when you develop strategies for the best way to beat hangman

... when you draw pictures on your graphing calculator when you are bored with hangman

... when you play "snakes" on your CD player when you are bored with hangman and drawing on your calculator

... when you have the software and hardware needed to connect your graphing calculator to your computer

... when you bought it not for games, but to download digitial signal processing and linear circuit analysis software

... when you downloaded this software because you wanted it, not because it would help you in class

... when your teachers stop calling on you in class in order to give the other students a chance

... when it takes less than a week after they first meet you for them to start doing this

... when you develop mathematical algorithms for solving Rubic's cubes (I knew a math teacher who did this)

crosscountry
2005-Dec-04, 04:06 PM
If you Sit at The Geek Table, By CHOICE ....

:lol:



if people sit with you, because it's the geek table. :wink;

teri tait
2005-Dec-04, 04:09 PM
I usually sit by myself and if someone talks to me I start choking in classic geek fashion ;)

mugaliens
2005-Dec-04, 07:44 PM
That one *is* funny. Guess I'm a nerd then... (ouch! the ellipsis thingie too)

What if I understand it but do not see the humor in it?

Is a geek a half-nerd? Is that any relation to a scruffy nerf-herder? (from Star Wars).

Ouch! I must be a nerd.

Jorge
2005-Dec-04, 10:40 PM
When you send emails via terminal/cmd just because you can, and do'nt feel like opening webmail/outlook.

When you compile Apache 2.2.0 with 64bit before anyone of the apache group has done that (i did this today)

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-05, 12:52 AM
... when you have sent email using telnet to port 25.
... when you didn't have to look up the syntax of SMTP to do so
... and it was for a legitimate purpose other than testing the mailserver.

Jorge
2005-Dec-05, 01:04 AM
telenet 127.0.0.1 25
EHLO localhost
MAIL FROM: jorge@localhost
RCPT TO: backup@localhost
DATA
Subject: Backup filex.bak
From: jorge@localhost
To: backup@localhost

filex.bak
.
QUIT

:D

Moose
2005-Dec-05, 02:43 AM
Jorge, unless you're using a special client, you lose marks for a typo on line 1. ;)

Otherwise, very good. :p

You know you're a geek when you see a THX splash spoof that reads "The Audience is Otaku" and laugh at the truth in the joke. Bonus geek marks for knowing where you are, and even more so if you can take a stab at what you're likely to see.

mickal555
2005-Dec-05, 05:43 AM
... when your teachers stop calling on you in class in order to give the other students a chance

... when it takes less than a week after they first meet you for them to start doing this


My science teacher does this :razz: and if nobody knows the answer he'd ask me...

Candy
2005-Dec-05, 08:31 AM
My teachers call on me while rolling their eyes. It's very irritating to me. I just ask questions they are sometimes unable to answer. I don't mean to, I just like to know how things work. I can't wait to see what the next level of education holds for me. :rolleyes:

I would purposely sit at the geek table to open them up to the real world. I kind of felt sorry for them. Hey, perhaps, that's why I was voted most irresistable in High School. I did not fit any "norm". :razz:

mugaliens
2005-Dec-05, 06:19 PM
When you compose a 118-card Fortran program off the top of your head and it comipiles without errors, actually runs, and produces the right answer, you're a certified genius extraordinairre.

When you it simply compiles without errors and actually runs, but some errors are involved, you are merely a genius.

When it doesn't run, you're still brilliant for avoiding compiling errors.

When it fails to compile, you are a nerd for using Fortran punch cards.

If you know how to program but not using Fortran punch cards you are a geek.

if you confuse "compile" and "compost" you are one of the rest of us.

Moose
2005-Dec-05, 07:19 PM
When you compose a 118-card Fortran program off the top of your head and it comipiles without errors, actually runs, and produces the right answer, you're a certified genius extraordinairre.

If you accidentally drop that 118-card deck, then put it back together in a couple of minutes despite the cards being totally unnumbered, then it compiles, runs, and produces the right answer on the first try; you're Mel.

And if you know who Mel is, then you're a geek.

Jorge
2005-Dec-05, 10:45 PM
Jorge, unless you're using a special client, you lose marks for a typo on line 1. ;)

Otherwise, very good. :p


Are you talking about

EHLO?

If so, it is accepted also, HELO should work on all SMTP server EHLO only one newer.


4. The EHLO command

A client SMTP supporting SMTP service extensions should start an SMTP
session by issuing the EHLO command instead of the HELO command. If
the SMTP server supports the SMTP service extensions it will give a
successful response (see section 4.3), a failure response (see 4.4),
or an error response (4.5). If the SMTP server does not support any
SMTP service extensions it will generate an error response (see
section 4.5).
Taken From: http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1869.txt

Your a geek if you know stuff like this and can find the rfc's to prove/check it in only 3 minutes.

Van Rijn
2005-Dec-06, 12:05 AM
And if you know who Mel is, then you're a geek.

How could I forget?
The Story of Mel (http://catb.org/~esr/jargon/html/story-of-mel.html) had me rolling on the floor the first few times I read it. You just have to admire someone like that.

I have an older paper copy of "The New Hacker's Dictionary." The first time I read The Jargon File (http://catb.org/~esr/jargon/html/online-preface.html) I wore myself out from laughter, and learned many important terms.

Moose
2005-Dec-06, 01:00 AM
Are you talking about

EHLO?


The previous line 1. (Sorry, I should have said line 0. I've been stuck in windows-land a bit too long. *sheepish grin*)

Unless you're using a non-default client, or are from before my time, I'm pretty sure it's spelled "telnet", not "telenet". :razz:

I'm not ashamed to admit I would have had to look up the rest. It's been a while since I've had much need to chat up a mail server.

Never did take the time to figure out pop3, either.

teri tait
2005-Dec-06, 01:17 AM
You email yourself reminder notes

Moose
2005-Dec-06, 01:18 AM
How could I forget?
The Story of Mel (http://catb.org/%7Eesr/jargon/html/story-of-mel.html) had me rolling on the floor the first few times I read it. You just have to admire someone like that.

I'd first encountered The Story of Mel in my college senior year. It took me three or four years of off-and-on study (spending an hour or two on it maybe three times a year) to understand the stunt Mel pulled.

When I finally understood, it was a little like what I imagine I'd feel were I to come to understand why the Mona Lisa was smirking.

Candy
2005-Dec-06, 01:33 AM
My heÂd now hurts from reÂding thÂt threÂd.

hippietrekx
2005-Dec-06, 02:13 AM
My science teacher does this :razz: and if nobody knows the answer he'd ask me...

Me, too. Except it's in any class, not just science, lol!:p

--hipster

Van Rijn
2005-Dec-06, 03:11 AM
I'd first encountered The Story of Mel in my college senior year. It took me three or four years of off-and-on study (spending an hour or two on it maybe three times a year) to understand the stunt Mel pulled.

When I finally understood, it was a little like what I imagine I'd feel were I to come to understand why the Mona Lisa was smirking.

Heh. I had the advantage of learning 6502 assembly pretty early (before I took an assembly class, actually - made the class much easier). The 6502 only has a few registers and most operations are memery mapped. It can do some fun things with indexing, and I did do a bit of self modifying code, though not too often. Also, I had studied Wozniak's Apple Monitor code. I won't go into it here, but Wozniak easily matched Mel - to save one byte, or one chip, he would go through amazing contortions. Truly awe inspiring.

It isn't like I would expect to duplicate Mel, but these weren't foreign concepts.

turbo-1
2005-Dec-06, 03:55 AM
When you compose a 118-card Fortran program off the top of your head and it comipiles without errors, actually runs, and produces the right answer, you're a certified genius extraordinairre.

When you it simply compiles without errors and actually runs, but some errors are involved, you are merely a genius.

When it doesn't run, you're still brilliant for avoiding compiling errors.

When it fails to compile, you are a nerd for using Fortran punch cards.

If you know how to program but not using Fortran punch cards you are a geek.

if you confuse "compile" and "compost" you are one of the rest of us.I will take you to task for statement 4. In 1970, using anything but IBM punch cards was inaccessable to students. You write your program, you key it in and punch your cards, you carefully order your cards and wrap them with a rubber band, and hope that the green and white striped fan-fold printout is appropriately thick and satisfying. Unless you were modeling something pretty basic, a thin printout stack was not a good sign.

TheBlackCat
2005-Dec-06, 04:28 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v89/toddrme/UT04.gif

(image hosted by me)

Candy
2005-Dec-06, 04:39 AM
I remember that! :lol:

teri tait
2005-Dec-06, 05:32 AM
...when you're father is your favorite 'hero' because he knows everthing

...when you get in trouble in kindergarten for doing all the work before the teacher explains it because you learned how to read at age 3

...when you're in 5th grade and your math class consists of yourself and 2 other students, no teacher and you set your own pace

...you are inducted into National Jr Honor Society at 12

Enzp
2005-Dec-06, 08:17 AM
If you recall what an IBM 026 was. (Card punch keyboard and machine)

Oh geez, I still have some decks in boxes in the atttic.

The old IBM card punchers, deck sorters, card prrinters and so on had these prgramming boards behind a hatch near the floor. It was a tray full of holes and jumper wires plugged into the holes to set up its function. I have a couple of these, complete with a whole spaghetti mess of jumper wires of all colors. I always thought they would make very cool cribbage boards.

If you know what I am talking about and had similar thoughts, you might be a geek.

Donnie B.
2005-Dec-06, 03:12 PM
...if you cringe when you read the title of this thread. Any real nerd knows it should be "you're", not "your".

darkhunter
2005-Dec-06, 04:17 PM
People try to make you feel better by saying "You're NOT a nerd"--they just don't realize how proud we are of our nerdhood/geekdom....

edited for spellleng

Argos
2005-Dec-06, 08:52 PM
..you think there are only lsz.s(s(z)) kinds of people in the world...

Jorge
2005-Dec-06, 10:26 PM
The previous line 1. (Sorry, I should have said line 0. I've been stuck in windows-land a bit too long. *sheepish grin*)

Unless you're using a non-default client, or are from before my time, I'm pretty sure it's spelled "telnet", not "telenet". :razz:

I'm not ashamed to admit I would have had to look up the rest. It's been a while since I've had much need to chat up a mail server.

Never did take the time to figure out pop3, either.

Ah your right...
Telenet is a local internet provider -_-

It's just a typo.

I can do pop too... well not with attachments though...
If i look at the rfc's.

Ilya
2005-Dec-06, 10:52 PM
If you recall what an IBM 026 was. (Card punch keyboard and machine).
That's not a geek, that's a geezer.

Ilya
2005-Dec-06, 10:53 PM
...if you cringe when you read the title of this thread. Any real nerd knows it should be "you're", not "your".
I never noticed. Math nerds do not care about such things.

Jorge
2005-Dec-06, 11:02 PM
I never noticed. Math nerds do not care about such things.

Nor do programers aperently...
I didn't nothice it either...
then again:
Mi Spieling Ist Very Guud dont u tink?

Candy
2005-Dec-07, 12:24 AM
...when you get in trouble in kindergarten for doing all the work before the teacher explains it because you learned how to read at age 3

...you are inducted into National Jr Honor Society at 12
Similar here, I could read and write in cursive by age 4. My teacher told me I was not allowed to do that, because the other children had not learned it, yet. I respected all teachers, so I thought she was correct.

Ditto on the NJHS.

Egarim
2005-Dec-07, 01:46 AM
...if you cringe when you read the title of this thread. Any real nerd knows it should be "you're", not "your".
I'm surprised it took so long for someone to point that out.

Ilya
2005-Dec-07, 01:53 AM
My heĀd now hurts from reĀding thĀt threĀd.
I copied it into Microsoft Word and auto-replaced all Ā's with nothing. Not really necessary though, because I read it years ago.

I never met Mel, but frankly I neither admire such people nor understand why anyone else admires them. (Some) programmers may think of themselves as artists, but they are paid to be engineers. Imagine that your car were designed like one of Mel's programs. It would get world's best gas mileage until the first gasket clogged. Then it would have to be junked because that gasket were completely unaccessible, and removing any one component would catastrophically affect everything else.

Sorry, but if I ran a software company, I would never hire Mel.

Van Rijn
2005-Dec-07, 02:14 AM
I copied it into Microsoft Word and auto-replaced all Ā's with nothing. Not really necessary though, because I read it years ago.


Huh. I read that in Firefox, and they didn't show up. They do in IE. There are plenty of other copies, for instance:

http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/mel.html



I never met Mel, but frankly I neither admire such people nor understand why anyone else admires them. (Some) programmers may think of themselves as artists, but they are paid to be engineers. Imagine that your car were designed like one of Mel's programs. It would get world's best gas mileage until the first gasket clogged. Then it would have to be junked because that gasket were completely unaccessible, and removing any one component would catastrophically affect everything else.

Sorry, but if I ran a software company, I would never hire Mel.

You work in another era and a different environment. Mel predated the structured programming era. He was working when speed and bytes really counted, but programs tended to be much shorter. The rules were different. Hardware was expensive, programmer time was relatively cheap. You still sometimes see the same thing in mass produced hardware where you want to keep the cost down so you may go with a low end microcontroller, but even that is fading as bigger chips keep getting cheaper.

Some of the tricks Wozniak used meant the difference between an affordable computer and something nobody could have purchased. And if you think art wasn't involved, you never looked.

Moose
2005-Dec-07, 02:53 AM
And if you think art wasn't involved, you never looked.

And in any case, Ilya, the difference between the more adventurous "bare-metal" code necessary in ancient computing (such as Mel's solution), and the inefficient (but far quicker to develop) mass-market visual basic junk is the difference between Munch's The Scream (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Scream) and a Velvet Kramer print. Either will cover a defect in your walls, but The Scream is worth hanging for its own sake.

Elegant and aggressive code is worth studying for its own sake, even if it's not appropriate to the task (or even any practical task at all).

Moose
2005-Dec-07, 03:05 AM
Art (http://www.catb.org/~esr/jargon/html/O/Obfuscated-C-Contest.html).

crosscountry
2005-Dec-08, 03:48 AM
I'd first encountered The Story of Mel in my college senior year. It took me three or four years of off-and-on study (spending an hour or two on it maybe three times a year) to understand the stunt Mel pulled.

When I finally understood, it was a little like what I imagine I'd feel were I to come to understand why the Mona Lisa was smirking.


Al Pacino knows why. Watch "The Devil's Advocate"

TheBlackCat
2005-Dec-10, 08:00 AM
-you read sprite comics religiously

-you actually know what a sprite comic is

Speaking of sprite comics, the latest 8-Bit theater has a reference to Carl Sagan and skepticism. The title is "The Dragon-Haunted World", and the whole episode is an obvious reference to Sagan's "dragon in the garage" argument, although I doubt anybody who hasn't read the book would pick up on it:
8-Bit Theater (http://www.nuklearpower.com/daily.php?date=051210). If you don't get it, the blue-haired guy in brown has steadfastly refused to believe in the existance of dragons for about the past 70 comics (note he is an elf).

crosscountry
2005-Dec-10, 08:19 AM
you can multiply and/or divide in binary.

Candy
2005-Dec-10, 08:21 AM
although I doubt anybody who hasn't read the book would pick up on it:
The owner of these books is most definitely a geek (or nerd). :p

teri tait
2005-Dec-10, 08:32 AM
...when you're father is your favorite 'hero' because he knows everthing

...when you get in trouble in kindergarten for doing all the work before the teacher explains it because you learned how to read at age 3

...when you're in 5th grade and your math class consists of yourself and 2 other students, no teacher and you set your own pace

...you are inducted into National Jr Honor Society at 12

You try to squeeze one whole math books lesson answers on one page of notebook paper...just because it was funny. John Hancock's idea but we 3 all did it!

LurchGS
2005-Dec-10, 08:36 AM
I'm surprised it took so long for someone to point that out.


waaaahh! nobody loves me. Look at page two (post #48 on this thread)

teri tait
2005-Dec-10, 08:45 AM
... you know the difference between "you're" and "your"

... you have more than one DVD player - more than two if you count computers

... you know that pizza and caffeine are the two primary food groups


Everyone knows chocolate and love 2 major foody groups
Caffiene...more of a dessert

Your and you're...yep that bugs me too.

Are your're happy now?

LurchGS
2005-Dec-10, 08:46 AM
Similar here, I could read and write in cursive by age 4. My teacher told me I was not allowed to do that, because the other children had not learned it, yet. I respected all teachers, so I thought she was correct.

Ditto on the NJHS.

never did understand that attitude iin school. If the student is capable, stop holding him back! I spent 12 years fighthing that system. My parents spent 23. If a student is disruptive in class, find out why he's bored!

Not that I was ever disruptive, of course. There's better ways to be stubborn. Like, do all the assignments ahead of time and store them in a folder in your desk. Then, when it's assigned, take it out and hand it in. Spend the rest of the class time reading (or working on assignments that are hard)

-----

you want it when?

five_distinct
2005-Dec-10, 04:10 PM
never did understand that attitude iin school. If the student is capable, stop holding him back! I spent 12 years fighthing that system. My parents spent 23. If a student is disruptive in class, find out why he's bored!

Not that I was ever disruptive, of course. There's better ways to be stubborn. Like, do all the assignments ahead of time and store them in a folder in your desk. Then, when it's assigned, take it out and hand it in. Spend the rest of the class time reading (or working on assignments that are hard)

-----

you want it when?

I was actually "uninvited" from highschool, despite my high grades, because I would only go a couple times a week.

So then all through college, for a lot of my courses, I would only go 3 times: First class, midterm, and final.

Except the fashion course I took...I never missed a class :D

I should add that I've noticed (among people my age, anyway) that declaring yourself a nerd or a geek without actually knowing anything about anything has become trés chic.

crosscountry
2005-Dec-10, 06:00 PM
The owner of these books is most definitely a geek (or nerd). :p


I'm sure he or she has some very redeeming qualities.:razz:

crosscountry
2005-Dec-10, 06:02 PM
never did understand that attitude iin school. If the student is capable, stop holding him back! I spent 12 years fighthing that system. My parents spent 23. If a student is disruptive in class, find out why he's bored!

Not that I was ever disruptive, of course. There's better ways to be stubborn. Like, do all the assignments ahead of time and store them in a folder in your desk. Then, when it's assigned, take it out and hand it in. Spend the rest of the class time reading (or working on assignments that are hard)

-----

you want it when?



I never thought of doing the assignments early. I was always the kid that didn't have to pay attention to understand the material. That got me into trouble way too much. The teachers loved me because I made good grades but then hated me for disrupting the class.

The best year I had in school was the 3rd grade. They bumped me from 1st to 3rd because I was ahead of the other kids. Finally I wasn't ahead and actually had to try to keep up (just for a little while anyway)

teri tait
2005-Dec-10, 07:03 PM
You get a laminated hall pass from your favorite teacher (Mr Pastos) so you can go to the cafeteria and pick up his lunch for him. (He had a game leg)
...and use said pass ruthlessly, to wander the halls at all hours and make faces at the windows in classrooms where your friends are.

Candy
2005-Dec-10, 07:22 PM
I'm sure he or she has some very redeeming qualities.:razz:
Yes, you do he does. ;)

I often did my homework early. It was like an obsession. If you gave me the weekly assignments for the semester, then they would get done by week 2 or 3. I started doing this after a winter blizzard, and the school's started handing out "snow packets". If you missed a day of school due to snow, then you had a pre-planned assignment. I liked it so much, that I started doing them out of habit for all assignments. I still do it today.

... if you've been paid to do another's homework assignment. This is the reason I've changed my major so many times. I settled for Marketing then Management for the final degree's, because I was extremely good at the subject(s).

teri tait
2005-Dec-10, 07:27 PM
A true nerd would never let anyone copy them!! I used to love 'setting the curve' in class...I'm evil that way

Gemini
2005-Dec-10, 08:10 PM
I did my work early in 5-7th and despised writing in cursive. I learned to read at age 5 or so. I used to be a rebel but my Kindergarten teacher yr 1 (repeat) coddled and coerced me into a muted neutrality. I rarely talk at school because I'm afraid no one will listen, I stutter alot lately.:( (rant over)

Oh yeah, and you might be one if you're a member of an astronomy related forum
:)

Gillianren
2005-Dec-11, 04:22 AM
I once wrote someone else's paper for a college class (I was in high school) about a movie I had not yet seen at that point. I got (he got) a B+ on it. Ten years later, and he still owes me a favor. Then again, I moved away, so it's kind of hard for me to collect.

You see, he typed too slow. So I told him to dictate. Turns out he didn't know what he wanted to say, so I wrote it for him. I can't stand to watch incompetence!

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2005-Dec-11, 04:37 AM
I did my work early in 5-7th and despised writing in cursive. I learned to read at age 5 or so. I used to be a rebel but my Kindergarten teacher yr 1 (repeat) coddled and coerced me into a muted neutrality. I rarely talk at school because I'm afraid no one will listen, I stutter alot lately.:( (rant over)

Oh yeah, and you might be one if you're a member of an astronomy related forum
:)
Yes ...

ALWAYS, a Possibility!!!!

:dance:

LurchGS
2005-Dec-11, 07:17 AM
guess that leaves me out.

dirty bad

mickal555
2005-Dec-11, 10:02 AM
I always do my assignments the night before they are due...

crosscountry
2005-Dec-11, 03:49 PM
I once wrote someone else's paper for a college class (I was in high school) about a movie I had not yet seen at that point. I got (he got) a B+ on it. Ten years later, and he still owes me a favor. Then again, I moved away, so it's kind of hard for me to collect.

You see, he typed too slow. So I told him to dictate. Turns out he didn't know what he wanted to say, so I wrote it for him. I can't stand to watch incompetence!


I did that one time. The guy had put off all his assingments until the end of the year. There there simply wasn't enough time to complete his tasks. I don't know what I made on the paper, nor do I remember what is covered. He sure was appreciative though.

We were good friends then, but I haven't heard from him in several years.

mugaliens
2005-Dec-11, 04:02 PM
Coffee in the states doesn't vary much from place to place (restaurants). Over here it ranges from heavenly to boiler compound.

But's always good for all-nighters.

Gemini
2005-Dec-11, 07:57 PM
I always do my assignments the night before they are due...

ditto :) (I only Know a few smilies)

Jorge
2005-Dec-11, 11:02 PM
Your a geek if you know all the "odd" questions on quizes(sp?) oneelse knows.
I usualy have that, my knowlege is usualy of less common subjects

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-12, 12:17 AM
... when the physics teacher in highschool actually paid you to stay behind and help prepare for next day's experiments.

mugaliens
2005-Dec-12, 12:58 AM
When the physics teacher showed up twenty minutes late for class so after five you hopped up and began the lesson.

TheBlackCat
2005-Dec-12, 05:25 AM
When you develop your on entirely new numbering system
That uses a base other than base-10
That uses multiple bases simultaneously
When you develop both a simple LED display variation on your numbering system and an easily hand-written variation.

crosscountry
2005-Dec-12, 07:45 AM
When you develop your on entirely new numbering system


I don't think it's possible to come up with a new numbering system. They've been around for quite a while.



That said, I independently originated (in my own mine without prior knowledge) a base 5 number system that I employ while swiming. I use my left hand to count laps, each full hand is one finger on the right hand. - Base 5


I usually get tired before having to use toes.

TheBlackCat
2005-Dec-12, 08:34 AM
I meant a numbering notation. The symbols that correspond to a given number. The number systems in common use in the US are either some subset the standard decimal symbols, decimal symbols plus a few letters for hexadecimal, or Roman numeral symbols. I came up with a new set of symbols that are both binary and hexadecimal at the same time Each symbol is easy to write by hand (every one can be written without taking your pen or pencil off the paper and is made of 2 or 3 lines, except the 0 which is 4 lines), can be displayed by a computer or LED display (using only four LEDs per digit), cannot be mistaken for one another even if written or displayed in a sloppy manner, and is not similar to any currently used numbers, mathematical symbols, or Roman or Greek letters comonly used in mathematics.

Tobin Dax
2005-Dec-12, 09:07 AM
I used to love 'setting the curve' in class...I'm evil that way

In my HS "Accelerated Biology" class, I would argue that I never actually set the curve because it was the second-highest grade that did. :D

Oh, and:
. . . if you're eight years out of high school and still bitter about not making the advanced/honors/smart-kid program, unlike all your friends, and you still don't see how that could have happened.


(Edit) TBC, I'm intrigued. Care to share that with us?

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-12, 11:08 AM
I don't think it's possible to come up with a new numbering system. They've been around for quite a while.

That said, I independently originated (in my own mine without prior knowledge) a base 5 number system that I employ while swiming. I use my left hand to count laps, each full hand is one finger on the right hand. - Base 5

When counting on my fingers I tend to use binary, it allows counting to 31 on just one hand as opposed to your 25 using two.

I remember playing around with various numbering systems, including one at base 3 using the digits -1, 0 and 1, another one with base faculty ie. digit n (counting from least significant and starting with 1) counted for n!

crosscountry
2005-Dec-13, 03:07 AM
When counting on my fingers I tend to use binary, it allows counting to 31 on just one hand as opposed to your 25 using two.

I remember playing around with various numbering systems, including one at base 3 using the digits -1, 0 and 1, another one with base faculty ie. digit n (counting from least significant and starting with 1) counted for n!


actually it's 30 5 left and 25 right.

Ilya
2005-Dec-13, 03:31 AM
I don't think it's possible to come up with a new numbering system. They've been around for quite a while.

That said, I independently originated (in my own mine without prior knowledge) a base 5 number system that I employ while swiming. I use my left hand to count laps, each full hand is one finger on the right hand. - Base 5

I usually get tired before having to use toes.
After 30 laps? Wimp!

To hell with numbering system, you are a REAL geek if you invent your own LANGUAGE! (J.R.R. Tolkein, please stand up!)

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2005-Dec-13, 03:43 AM
After 30 laps? Wimp!

To hell with numbering system, you are a REAL geek if you invent your own LANGUAGE! (J.R.R. Tolkein, please stand up!)
... If you Just HAVE, to Say:

Please Stand up, Please Stand Up!!!

:dance:

TheBlackCat
2005-Dec-13, 03:43 AM
(Edit) TBC, I'm intrigued. Care to share that with us?

Sure. Here is the graphical version I made. The top symbol in each line is the hand-written symbol, the middle symbol is the digitial symbol, and the bottom is the decimal equivalent. The far left symbol shows which lines correspond to which bits in a binary number.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v89/toddrme/numberingsystem.jpg

Basically the important parts are the four lines making the sides of a square, rotated 45 degrees so the corners are facing up, down, left, and right. The presence of one of the side of the square means the binary value of the bit corresponding to that location has a value of 1, while the absence of that side means the binary bit is 0. The bits proceed clockwise starting at the upper-left (both arbitrary decisions). So the upper-right line corresponds to the first bit, the lower-right line corresponds to the second bit, the lower-left line corresponds to the third bit, and the upper left line corresponds to the fourth bit. So the decimal number of 10 would have a binary value of 1010. In my notation this would mean there is a line in the lower right and a line in the upper left. For 0 there is simply a vertical line.

This is all there is to the digital display of the numbers. There are some complications to writing them by hand that leads to some additional parts of the hand-written version. For instance, in digital displays the numbers are all lined up in a neat row and specifically-spaced columns. Numbers that have the same shape (1 and 4 which both look like back-slashes and 2 and 8 which both look like forward-slashes) can be easily told apart based on their location in the row and column of the digitial display. However, you cannot count on this with hand-written numbers. Sloppy hand writing or non-lined paper could make 1 and 4 indistinguishable and 2 and 8 indistinguishable. For these four numbers a horizontal line passing between the left and righ corner of the square is added. You can tell the numbers apart whether they are on the left or right side of the line and whether they are above or below the line. This line is also used for 5 and 10 so the lines are connected and so the numbers can be written without taking your pencil off the paper. 9 looks like a carat and 3 and 12 look like greater than and less than signs, so a line going from the middle of the square to either the top or right corner are used to identify these. 0 loks like a one, so a small loop is added to the bottom of the vertical line signifying zero in order to identify it. All of these are, once again, arbitrary, although having the short lines going from the center to the one place is supposed to signify that is the first bit.

Most the arbitrary decision I made are based on standard western europen conventions, they could easily be changed. All other mathematical symbols stay the same.

There are several advantages to this. First, as long as someone knows the starting place and the direction the bits progress anyone can read the numbers without having to learn a set of arbitrary symbols. People from different cultures that use different conventions would simply have to tell each other the starting place and rotation direction and the numbers could be tranlsated pretty much effortlessly. It would also be easier for computers to handle. You would need 5 buttons, the 4 sides and a "store" button. You would hit the 0-4 buttons corresponding to the current digit, their binary values would be stored to temporary memory, then hit the "store" button and the computer or calculator would simply right the bits entered since the previous "store" command to the correct places in a binary number and then proceed to the next 4-bit set. No mathematical calculations would have to be carried out at all to convert key presses into memory.

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2005-Dec-13, 03:54 AM
All I Can Say, is WOW!!!!

For a Book Series, I'm Writing, I was Trying, to Come Up, With a Base-11 System, For Use, By an Inter-Stellar Community ...

After That Display, I'm Thinking your Idea, Would Work, Much Better ...

Any Chance, we Could Come To, Some Kind of, Arrangement?

crosscountry
2005-Dec-13, 04:09 AM
After 30 laps? Wimp!

To hell with numbering system, you are a REAL geek if you invent your own LANGUAGE! (J.R.R. Tolkein, please stand up!)


I don't swim that much anymore. (for the record, a lap is 2 lengths; some people confuse that)

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-13, 11:46 AM
After 30 laps? Wimp!

To hell with numbering system, you are a REAL geek if you invent your own LANGUAGE! (J.R.R. Tolkein, please stand up!)
Who's J.R.R. Tolkein and what language did he invent?

crosscountry
2005-Dec-13, 05:17 PM
he invented 3 IIRC. the Elven Languages of Middle Earth. they had their own alpha-numeric characters, syntax, grammer, and vocabulary independent of languages on earth.

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-13, 05:57 PM
No, that was J.R.R. Tolkien, I was asking about J.R.R. Tolkein.
I'm starting to sound like the Monty Python bookshop scetch, but it's a pet peeeve I'll comment on it every time. :)

... when you see Monty Python connections everywhere.

Candy
2005-Dec-13, 06:32 PM
No, that was J.R.R. Tolkien, I was asking about J.R.R. Tolkein.
I'm starting to sound like the Monty Python bookshop sketch, but it's a pet peeve I'll comment on it every time. :)

... when you see Monty Python connections everywhere.
HenrikOlsen, are you attending the TAM4? I've almost got my school and work schedules ironed out. You crack me up! :shifty:

Candy
2005-Dec-13, 06:41 PM
I always wanted one of those geek awards, are there really any...
BTW back to topic:
I like to play computer gamed and i am 733t i normally pwn everyone in my house LAN parties... anybody wanna come along. i can tell you what kindda games we play.
I've been wanting to visit London. I'm not sure about the dates, yet. I'm thinking the week of July 4th, though. When are these LAN parties of yours? :shifty:

You should ask the geek award question on the geek thread. I bet there are some folks that would love to get one started. Hey, the BA and Frasier could start one. This could get the forum and websites really kicking with Universities vs Independent Teams fighting to be the Ultimate Geek. :think:

I thought this would be cool if it's something interesting to everyone - the Ultimate Geek Award. :)

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-14, 01:34 AM
HenrikOlsen, are you attending the TAM4? I've almost got my school and work schedules ironed out. You crack me up! :shifty:
I live in Denmark so the trip would be a bit out of my expense limit:(
I did order the schepchicks calendar (http://skepchick.mu.nu/), so I'll be there in spirit through whoever was helped to get there.

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2005-Dec-14, 05:12 AM
No, that was J.R.R. Tolkien, I was asking about J.R.R. Tolkein.
I'm starting to sound like the Monty Python bookshop scetch, but it's a pet peeeve I'll comment on it every time. :)

... when you see Monty Python connections everywhere.
OK ....

Maybe I'm Just Being Dense, But, What's The Joke, here?

Enzp
2005-Dec-14, 05:20 AM
Spelling police.

Enzp
2005-Dec-14, 05:22 AM
Or to tip the hat to my favorite Barney Miller eposide:

What's wrong?
E I?
E I.
Oh.

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-14, 05:49 AM
Maybe I'm Just Being Dense, But, What's The Joke, here?
Paraphrasing Python:
Do you have any books by J.R.R.Tolkien?
Yes we do.
That's Tolkein with E-I, the well-known Flemish author.
No, in that case we don't have any.

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-15, 05:49 AM
... when you have a tattoo because a character in your favorite tv series had it ... and the character was the librarian.

SolusLupus
2005-Dec-15, 07:25 PM
When you build your own game system because D&D, GURPS, etc., just don't cut it for you.

Guess what I'm going to be doing? =D

01101001
2005-Dec-16, 05:59 AM
You're a geek if you express nerd like this:

http://www.01101001.com/images/nerd_t.gif (http://www.01101001.com/images/nerd.gif)

You're a nerd if you express geek like this:

http://www.01101001.com/images/geek_t.gif (http://www.01101001.com/images/geek.gif)

Candy
2005-Dec-16, 07:20 AM
You'e a geek if you google {image} Phil Plait and the above "like" appears. Try it, I did. :)

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-16, 07:34 AM
http://www.iaeste.dk/~henrik/images/GN.pngNerd, Geek, what's the difference?
My first attempt at an ambigram, they're actually fun to make.

Candy
2005-Dec-16, 04:52 PM
http://www.iaeste.dk/~henrik/images/GN.pngNerd, Geek, what's the difference?
My first attempt at an ambigram, they're actually fun to make.
It kind of looks like queen, too. :shifty:

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-16, 07:05 PM
I said fun, not good :)

Jorge
2005-Dec-16, 10:13 PM
I said fun, not good :)

There not bad...
and hey, your not making money with them just having fun so it doesn't mather if there not perfect :)

Jorge
2006-Jan-14, 11:17 PM
When your cell phone can be used for: calling (not like i use that), texting, e-mailing, taking picture (2MP) and recording video...

When you watch all the media recorded with your cellphone on your PDA via bluetooth while your cell is in your pocket :)

teri tait
2006-Jan-14, 11:44 PM
You're a geek if you express nerd like this:

http://www.01101001.com/images/nerd_t.gif (http://www.01101001.com/images/nerd.gif)

You're a nerd if you express geek like this:

http://www.01101001.com/images/geek_t.gif (http://www.01101001.com/images/geek.gif)

I want to wallpaper my home with this beautiful writing...does that make me a geek or a nerd or an incredibly bad interior designer?

It doesn't matter, I LOVE THIS STUFF!!

Soltras
2006-Jan-15, 07:21 AM
You're a geek like me if the first thing you noticed when you saw this thread was the bad grammar in its title.

The_Radiation_Specialist
2006-Jan-15, 09:37 AM
. . . when you can name all the moons of Uranus in order of orbit period and in reverse.

. . . when you figure out the solution to a programming problem while in the shower.

. . . when you forget a person's name but not their e-mail address.

. . . when you know the first 50 decimals of pi and e by heart.

. . . when you download programs from the net to calculate a billion decimals of pi on you PC.

. . . when the first thing you do when you see a guitar is to explain how the turning of tuners decreases/increase the frequency.

. . . when your room is cleaner after a major earthquake.

. . . when you steal scientific (radiation, biohazard) warnings for personal use.

. . . when you use scientific (radiation, biohazard) warnings for your avatar in a space/astronomy related forum. :shifty:

teri tait
2006-Jan-15, 11:37 AM
...If you know what an ampersand is & what it does in a sentence, you may a booknerd.

Jorge
2006-Jan-15, 10:10 PM
. . . when you figure out the solution to a programming problem while in the shower.

I have this sometimes, also while sitting in a car/bus/train or during and exame (yes -_-)


. . . when you forget a person's name but not their e-mail address.

I don't have that... but i remember all IP's + subnets off all school computer & the once in my homenetwork... but i have a hard time remembering phone numbers


. . . when you steal scientific (radiation, biohazard) warnings for personal use.

Actually i have a biohazard sign on my fridge... saying i store LN2 and some other stuff...

It seems quite effective to keep poeple away from it.
(I tried to get some LN2 to cool my PC last year... couln't get hold of this :()

Jorge
2006-Jan-15, 10:11 PM
... you do a google search/wikipedia search on flirting, to realize you where flirting with a girl at a political gathering (don't ask) earlier and didn't realize this.
I sort of got the cleu when 4 poeple asked if i like the girl

teri tait
2006-Jan-16, 02:59 AM
...if you fall in love with the ideal man and he is the best inventor, poet, and a genius of scientific experimentation ever!

:)

(At least in your eyes ;))

Tog
2006-Jan-16, 08:35 AM
When you build your own game system because D&D, GURPS, etc., just don't cut it for you.

Guess what I'm going to be doing? =D

I've completly reworked the Palladium combat system to make it more 'realistic', and I made up my own system that resulted in 37 pages for rules for hand to hand combat and required a calculator to determine a hit or miss. All based on experiences teaching Kenpo Karate and studying other forms. ;)

My nerd/geek definitions have been:

Nerd- a person who goes out of their way to learn something for the sake of knowing it.

Geek- a person who goes out of their way to learn something for the sake of impressing others with that knowledge.

I'm a nerd, with geekish leanings. I know that the Enterprise traveling at warp 7 is travelling at 656.13c*, I have no hope of ever using that knowledge to get a date.

Of all the Geeks, baseball geeks make me the most nuts. When I hear the announcer say something like, "... Comes up to bat. He's hitting .456 against right handed pitchers, on natural grass, during night games, above 2500 feet, when the temperature is over 75..." I just cringe, because I'm sure no one actually looked that up anyplace. Someone with access just knew it.

The giveaway phrases for a nerd are: "Well, actually..."; "Accoring to..."; etc
The giveaway phrase for a geek is: "Okay, but did YOU know...";"

*For the Enterprise D the formula is warp factor^3.3333~. For TOS, it's warp factor^3.

Carnifex
2006-Jan-16, 11:55 AM
No, that is 656.135396 :p

...when you say person did a mistake because he or she approximated fifth valuable digit incorrectly :)

Jorge
2006-Jan-16, 09:16 PM
then i'm an astronomy nerd and a computer geek/nerd.

I learn about astronomy because its fun, no-)one around here knows i'm interested in it.

I learn about computer because it intrests me... and i happen to like help poeple with then... but i also like to carry bleeding edge gadgets :)

The_Radiation_Specialist
2006-Jan-16, 09:29 PM
Jorge,
just visited your website...very cool... you truly are a nerd/geek! :)

Jorge
2006-Jan-16, 10:10 PM
Jorge,
just visited your website...very cool... you truly are a nerd/geek! :)

I always forget i got a profile on here... i was about to ask... how did you find it lol.

Basicly PHP programing is my hobby, configuring apache was esention for setting up a dev server and got carried a little bit out of hand... photoshop is needed for creating nice layouts so it is only natural...

But what good i all the knowledge i achieved... if i do'nt share.

actually what i was trying to say... thanks for the kind words :razz:

Tobin Dax
2006-Jan-20, 05:45 AM
*For the Enterprise D the formula is warp factor^3.3333~. For TOS, it's warp factor^3.

Well, I'll be, you're right. I knew the x^3 for TOS, but I've never read or heard that it's x^4/3 in the modern era. Had to check that with the TNG Tech Manual. I still get to keep my Trek Geek license, though. Trust me. :D

Candy
2006-Jan-20, 06:13 AM
...if you fall in love with the ideal man and he is the best inventor, poet, and a genius of scientific experimentation ever!

:)

(At least in your eyes ;))
Nikola Tesla? :shifty:

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2006-Jan-20, 06:21 AM
Well, I'll be, you're right. I knew the x^3 for TOS, but I've never read or heard that it's x^4/3 in the modern era. Had to check that with the TNG Tech Manual. I still get to keep my Trek Geek license, though. Trust me. :D
If you Correct Someone's Exponent, As it Is Actually, x10/3 ...

Especially, If you Superscript, Said Exponent ...

Sorry, Fellow TREKKIE!

:p

Tog
2006-Jan-20, 08:10 AM
If you Correct Someone's Exponent, As it Is Actually, x10/3 ...

Especially, If you Superscript, Said Exponent ...

Sorry, Fellow TREKKIE!

:p

When you know the conversion factors to go from imperial to metric to more decimal places than your calculator's convesion functions.

When doing any calculation that covers a period longer than 4 years, you use 365.2422.

If you work at a problem for so long that by the time you figure it out, you forgot why you wanted to know. (guilty)

OT: I'm not really a Trekkie in the pure sense. I liked the shows (didn't watch Voyager past the second episode) but the only two conventions I ever attended were under duress. (GF at the time was big into it). The sad part was I would have placed very well in the trivia contest (matching plot to episode title), and in a of 10 people on stage actually playing the game, no one could figure out the following Wheel of Fortune style puzzle:
Place (may have even been "location on Enterprise D")
T _ _
F _ R _ _ R D
Until they had the vowels. :wall:

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2006-Jan-20, 05:17 PM
When you know the conversion factors to go from imperial to metric to more decimal places than your calculator's convesion functions.

When doing any calculation that covers a period longer than 4 years, you use 365.2422.

If you work at a problem for so long that by the time you figure it out, you forgot why you wanted to know. (guilty)

OT: I'm not really a Trekkie in the pure sense. I liked the shows (didn't watch Voyager past the second episode) but the only two conventions I ever attended were under duress. (GF at the time was big into it). The sad part was I would have placed very well in the trivia contest (matching plot to episode title), and in a of 10 people on stage actually playing the game, no one could figure out the following Wheel of Fortune style puzzle:
Place (may have even been "location on Enterprise D")
T _ _
F _ R _ _ R D
Until they had the vowels. :wall:
I'm Going, to Have to Spin The Wheel, Pat ...

How About, an "N"?

I'll Spin, Again ...

"W"!

My Guess?

That's Simple, TEN FORWARD!

Harvestar
2006-Jan-21, 12:21 AM
... if you actually know one of the male contestants on "Beauty and the Geek 2" (one of my fellow grad students went to CalTech with the rubics cube astrophysicist guy)

... if you think some of the male contestants on Beauty and the Geek remind you of your officemates, classmates, friends, and/or fiance.

... if you get annoyed that they don't have any female version of Beauty and the Geek

... if your fiance is super thrilled at the cool Edgerton shirt of the bullet slicing through the playing card you got him for his birthday

... if you're annoyed that they didn't have the Edgerton shirt in your size

... if you're thrilled about the backpacking solar panel you got for Christmas

Tobin Dax
2006-Jan-22, 02:46 AM
If you Correct Someone's Exponent, As it Is Actually, x10/3 ...

Especially, If you Superscript, Said Exponent ...

Sorry, Fellow TREKKIE!

:p

Hey! Someone's ability to accurately rewrite decimals as fractions when they're excited over a new revelation has nothing to do with their status as a Trekkie. I'm almost willing to start a Trek Trivia thread just to prove my point for that poor soul. (Plus, 4/3 made sense somehow as I brain-farted to equations of state in cosmology.)


Back on topic:
... if you don't watch Beauty and the Geek because you're too frightened or embarrassed, and you're not going to think about which one it is.

ToSeek
2006-Jan-23, 03:47 PM
If you Correct Someone's Exponent, As it Is Actually, x10/3 ...

Especially, If you Superscript, Said Exponent ...

Sorry, Fellow TREKKIE!

:p

And that's only for warp factor 1-9. Between 9 and 10, it goes asymptotic, so there's no warp factor greater than 10.

Tog
2006-Jan-23, 07:42 PM
And that's only for warp factor 1-9. Between 9 and 10, it goes asymptotic, so there's no warp factor greater than 10.

Except for few odd episodes where Kirk & co were being taken to the Andromeda Galaxy and the final ep of TNG, when one ship was described as doing warp 14. (long after the no arp 10 thing was supposed to be set in stone. Nice writing ST staff...:shhh:

sarongsong
2006-Jan-30, 09:06 PM
You know your a geek or a nerd if...you find yourself playing on the smartest team in basketball (http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-plaschke29jan29,0,86244.story?coll=la-home-sports)?
...The only two Caltech fans in the gym are stomping loudly on the bleachers...http://bautforum.com/images/icons/icon7.gif]x

Candy
2006-Jan-30, 09:23 PM
you find yourself playing on the smartest team in basketball (http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-plaschke29jan29,0,86244.story?coll=la-home-sports)? :)

"The probability of us winning a game is barely detectable, it involves many variables, it's very small but it's there," says Yang Hai, a sophomore guard. "We do have a mathematical chance of winning. But it has to fall into the chaos theory."

Caltech's roster has only six players who had high school varsity basketball experience and eight who were high school valedictorians.
During the handshake line after one loss a couple of years ago, the opponents were dismissively greeting the Beavers with, "Great game, now go find a cure for cancer."

One of the players on that team, Gustavo Olm, finally fired back.

"When I do find a cure for cancer," he said, "I ain't giving it to you."
This is great! (full length article) (http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-plaschke29jan29,0,7655195,full.column) :lol:

sarongsong
2006-Jan-31, 12:06 AM
Yeah, it had me ROFL at Sunday brunch---I trust you approve Caltech's undergrad M/F ratio: 614/282 ?

Jorge
2006-Jan-31, 09:41 PM
You know your a geek when...
you carry a PDA that allows you to connect to wifi where ever you are (aka using unprotected networks)... if there is non avaible and you feel like spending money you link it to your G3 phone to surf at good speeds.

Tobin Dax
2006-Feb-02, 03:14 AM
During the handshake line after one loss a couple of years ago, the opponents were dismissively greeting the Beavers with, "Great game, now go find a cure for cancer."

Well, whatever happened in that game (or any, really) Oregon State is unquestionably superior to CalTech. Heck, geography is the most obvious example of that. :D Go Beavs!

[/hijack]

Torsten
2006-Feb-02, 04:33 AM
Answer (http://www.bautforum.com/showpost.php?p=453883&postcount=72) in a similarly titled thread.

So I need a break from work. A week somewhere hot would do. But instead of a week in the Caribbean, I registered for AAAS Annual Meeting (http://www.aaas.org/meetings/Annual_Meeting/) in St. Louis in a couple of weeks. The registration process asks for the main purpose of attending the meeting. I answered "fun".

A proud nerd.

sarongsong
2006-Feb-03, 12:04 AM
Caltech seems to be on a roll...
Students in Tutus Saved From Mountain Road (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/02/01/AR2006020101681.html)
..."You've got to remember that common sense is not factored into the intelligence quotient," said Deputy Greg Gabriel, who leads the Altadena Search and Rescue team...

Kelfazin
2006-Feb-03, 03:17 AM
You know you're a geek...
-if you've ever told a joke with the punchline "No, because it was outside the plane of the ecliptic!"

-if you've ever been stopped on the way into the office by somebody asking "I was on my way home last night and saw a bright light over the mountins that lasted 10 seconds, what did I see?"

-if know what LASER stands for and can explain exactly how they work.

Gillianren
2006-Feb-03, 08:18 PM
- If you get phone calls from people at work asking you when WWI started. (No, really. They just knew I'd know.)

Side note--I'm from Altadena. You've no idea how rare mention of it is anywhere; having seen it here, I had to jump in.

AtomicDog
2007-Jun-12, 06:53 PM
..You know that it's "Spider-Man", not "Spiderman."

Noclevername
2007-Jun-12, 06:57 PM
You make neutronium jokes: "Hey, that elevator was so crowded, my neutrons were touchin' each other! Bada-bing!"

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-12, 06:59 PM
You make neutronium jokes: "Hey, that elevator was so crowded, my neutrons where touchin' each other! Bada-bing!"


You're a geek, aren't ya? :)

Noclevername
2007-Jun-12, 07:01 PM
You're a geek, aren't ya? :)

How'd you know?
:whistle:

JohnBStone
2007-Jun-12, 08:12 PM
When your signature is more geeky than you?

Noclevername
2007-Jun-12, 08:21 PM
When you nitpick other geeks' nitpicks?

Noclevername
2007-Jun-12, 08:23 PM
When you point out that the title of this thread should say "you're" instead of "your".

ADDED: Now it's fixed, so it's not funny anymore.

Fazor
2007-Jun-12, 08:41 PM
When you're dissapointed that spider-man underwear are not available in your size?

Gillianren
2007-Jun-12, 08:56 PM
..You know that it's "Spider-Man", not "Spiderman."

. . . And you correct the people at Suncoast whose sign is punctuated incorrectly.

Fazor
2007-Jun-12, 09:02 PM
..You know that it's "Spider-Man", not "Spiderman."

Jeeze I missed this one until Gillian pointed it out, and am apparently guilty of it from my post! ...of course, I've never claimed not to be a geek...

Edit: and per Jerry Seinfield, wouldn't Spiderman be Jewish? :)

Noclevername
2007-Jun-13, 03:22 AM
...When you spend an hour debating which is better, Order of the Stick or Schlock Mercenary, and why.

...When you spend an hour doing anything having to do with a webcomic.

Noclevername
2007-Jun-13, 03:33 AM
...When you have space dreams. (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=57448)

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-13, 03:43 AM
. . . If you know that an ellipsis (see the beginning of this sentence for an example) only has three periods in it. And what it's called.

I just want to be a gramatically correct geek . . . :)

Is there always a space between the last letter and the first period? Like this . . .

Is there always a space between the last period and the first character? . . . Like this

Gillianren
2007-Jun-13, 06:41 AM
I just want to be a gramatically correct geek . . . :)

Is there always a space between the last letter and the first period? Like this . . .

Is there always a space between the last period and the first character? . . . Like this

Yes and yes. Also, when you're ending a sentence with it, you still do need the period that ends your sentence--and there's a space between the last period of the ellipsis and that period as well.

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-13, 02:08 PM
Ah, you're slipping Gillian! I misspelled 'grammatically'. :)

Gillianren
2007-Jun-13, 08:05 PM
Seriously. Do you want me to start correcting every error I see around here? (R.A.F.'s posts alone . . . .)

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-13, 10:34 PM
This is great! (full length article) (http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-plaschke29jan29,0,7655195,full.column) :lol:
HOW did this get on this thread???????

LurchGS
2007-Jun-14, 04:20 AM
You wish you were more like RIff or Bun-Bun, but you know in your heart of hearts you are Torg

torque of the town
2007-Jun-14, 09:58 AM
When you take a personal dislike to one of the 'bots' in U.T. :(


David

Noclevername
2007-Jun-15, 02:58 AM
If you get just about every reference on this thread, you're an UBER-geek.

(Reads thread.)

Oh, no!!

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-16, 01:18 AM
If you're posting here on a Friday night! :whistle:

Tobin Dax
2007-Jun-16, 03:00 AM
If you're posting here on a Friday night! :whistle:

That doesn't necessarily preclude being a geek. Now, posting *consistently* on Friday nights might do it. :) :shifty:

Tucson_Tim
2007-Jun-16, 03:07 AM
That doesn't necessarily preclude being a geek. Now, posting *consistently* on Friday nights might do it. :) :shifty:

Well, I have an excuse. I'm married. My life is over. "The full catastrophe" (from Zorba the Greek).

Oh crap, my wife just saw this. Sorry honey, I was just joking. Really . . . (sounds of being hit over the head with a blunt instrument).

ZaphodBeeblebrox
2007-Jun-16, 04:57 AM
Well, I have an excuse. I'm married. My life is over. "The full catastrophe" (from Zorba the Greek).

Oh crap, my wife just saw this. Sorry honey, I was just joking. Really . . . (sounds of being hit over the head with a blunt instrument).
Hmmm ...

Juust Remember ...

A Good Friend Wiill Help you Move, a BEST Friend Wiill Help you Move The Body!

LurchGS
2007-Jun-16, 05:17 AM
I'm safe - the wifeoid just got home from a week in the mountains, being medical staff to a girl scout camp. She's exhausted. And, asleep. I can say what I want to say, and there's not a thing she can do about it.

You are an admiral of the nerd fleet if you have more than one copy of "Battle Beyond the Stars" (in which Richard Thomas' ship is described anatomically by both men and women - but using very different segments of human anatomy. The women all say one thing, the guys all say another.)

and you OWN the fleet if you recognize lines ripped from MST3K in other movies and shows.

-------------------

"Wall mounted keyboards! It must be.... THE FUTURE!" T. Servo

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-16, 03:20 PM
You are a nerdette if:
1) The size of a man's brain matters more than the size of a man's biceps
2) You own more books than clothes
3) You would rather read 'SciAm' than 'People' or 'US'
4) All of your heroes when you were growing up were scientists
5) All of your crushes when you were growing up were scientists (real or fictional)

tofu
2007-Jun-16, 04:00 PM
you put fertilizer on only 1/2 of your lawn - the other half is your control group.

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-16, 04:58 PM
you put fertilizer on only 1/2 of your lawn - the other half is your control group.

Good one!:lol:

Gillianren
2007-Jun-16, 07:48 PM
2) You own more books than clothes

What on Earth would I do with 1300 items of clothing?

Paracelsus
2007-Jun-16, 07:55 PM
What on Earth would I do with 1300 items of clothing?

ROFL!

Wow, you've got a big library! I've had to pare mine down so much due to multiple moves that mine number about 300-400 maybe. I wound up throwing out quite a few books that I was actually quite fond of. :(