PDA

View Full Version : Narnia...



peter eldergill
2005-Nov-27, 06:04 PM
I've just borrowed the entire Chronicles of Narnia from a friend and it appears that The Lion, Witch and the Wardrobe is not the first book, something about the Magiacians nephew appears to be the first book, althought the copyright of The Lion seems to be 1950 and the Magician seems to be 1955

Does anyone know what order I should read these in or if it will make a difference?

Also in the front of the book, the Lion is listed second and Magician first

Pete

IsaacKuo
2005-Nov-27, 06:07 PM
When in doubt, always read in the order of release. That's the order in which the original readers would have read.

TheBlackCat
2005-Nov-27, 07:32 PM
I agree with Isaac. Most series, even if the release dates are out of the chronological order for the series, are written so they should be read in release order not chronological order.

genebujold
2005-Nov-27, 07:45 PM
More about The Author: http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2005/012/9.28.html

GDwarf
2005-Nov-27, 08:06 PM
Magician's Nephew is written later then the Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, but it is supposed to be read first.
IIRC it's Magician's Nephew followed by the books in order of release.

Donnie B.
2005-Nov-27, 09:39 PM
The Magician's Nephew makes sense to read first because it occurs first in the internal chronology of the stories. It was, in fact, the second-last of the seven books to be written.

It so happens that TMN was the first of the Narnia stories I read, but unfortunately I didn't read the rest in the right sequence, either by publishing date or internal chronology. Fortunately, each book is self-contained; the series can really be read in any order (though it's best to save The Last Battle for last).

FWIW, the single-volume edition of the Chronicles (the one with the color versions of the original illustrations) has the stories arranged by internal chronology, not by date of initial publication. That is, TMN is first, followed by LWW, HHB, PC, VDT, SC, and LB. It seems the producers of the upcoming movie chose the opposite approach, however, since LWW is the first Narnia film.

Donnie B.
2005-Nov-27, 09:42 PM
Magician's Nephew is written later then the Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, but it is supposed to be read first.
IIRC it's Magician's Nephew followed by the books in order of release.Well, The Horse and His Boy is also out of place in the internal chronology. In fact, it takes place entirely within the time frame covered in LWW (though after the major events in that book).

peter eldergill
2005-Nov-27, 10:55 PM
Thanks folks, I'll read Magician first..it seems it won't take long!

Pete

Gillianren
2005-Nov-28, 01:12 AM
I was just discussing this (on the phone, with an actual human being I see in person sometimes!). I read 'em as C. S. Lewis wrote 'em. In fact, this means that I prefer my older American-release copies to the recently released versions, as the older American release copies include certain changes he made that, according to my copy of Companion to Narnia, he preferred to the original. The newer editions go back to the old British version.

(For the record: the most notable change, aside from Fenris Ulf's name, is the end of the Dark Island chapter of Voyage of the Dawn Treader.)

(Yes, I've put way too much thought into this.)

Eroica
2005-Nov-28, 04:21 PM
The Chronicles of Narnia: Publication and Reading Order (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronicles_of_Narnia#The_books:_publication_and_re ading_order)

I read them all in narrative order recently, but I think I waited too long to start. I know I would have loved them as a child, but I hated them as an adult.

Lianachan
2005-Nov-28, 04:35 PM
The Chronicles of Narnia: Publication and Reading Order (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronicles_of_Narnia#The_books:_publication_and_re ading_order)

I read them all in narrative order recently, but I think I waited too long to start. I know I would have loved them as a child, but I hated them as an adult.

I read them all as a child, and did indeed love them. I re-read them a couple of years ago, and found the language to be a tad dated. At one point Lucy "made love to them all", for example, and various characters were frequently "gay". The language of many contemporary books (Lord Of The Rings, for example) hasn't dated in such a way (my example being intentionally archaic in the first place).

peter eldergill
2005-Nov-28, 07:15 PM
The Chronicles of Narnia: Publication and Reading Order (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronicles_of_Narnia#The_books:_publication_and_re ading_order)

I read them all in narrative order recently, but I think I waited too long to start. I know I would have loved them as a child, but I hated them as an adult.

From Wikipedia....I sould have known!!

Thanks. An interesting entry

Pete

Swift
2005-Nov-28, 07:49 PM
<snip>
It seems the producers of the upcoming movie chose the opposite approach, however, since LWW is the first Narnia film.
As an outsider (I have not read the books) I would guess that one reason for this is that it is the most widely know of the books (I knew there were others, but didn't even know their names :o ).

genebujold
2005-Nov-29, 12:07 AM
Anyone read his other works, such as Perelandra?

Gillianren
2005-Nov-29, 12:33 AM
The language of many contemporary books (Lord Of The Rings, for example) hasn't dated in such a way (my example being intentionally archaic in the first place).

I'm going to assume that, by "contemporary," you mean "contemporary to The Chronicles of Narnia"; I'm also going to have to disagree. I agree that the problem with Lord of the Rings is not dated language, but I can cite many, many books from that approximate time period whose language is equally dated, if not more so. (As an example, look at any hard-boiled detective novel of the time. There are others, even other children's books, but that's the most obvious example.)

Lianachan
2005-Nov-29, 01:37 AM
I'm going to assume that, by "contemporary," you mean "contemporary to The Chronicles of Narnia";Indeed, yes.
I agree that the problem with Lord of the Rings is not dated languageThat's not agreeing with me - I never mentioned any problems with Lord Of The Rings at all (and would only ever do so if sorely pressed).

Are there modern, and/or perhaps American, editions of the Narnia books with modified language at all? I don't think this dating of language is a problem, it was just something that I really noticed for the first time during my relatively recent re-reading of the entire series.

jaeger
2005-Nov-29, 04:41 AM
Anyone read his other works, such as Perelandra?

Yep, many years ago while in college. Preferred "Out of the Silent Planet" to "Perelandra" and "That Hideous Strength" and had difficulty slogging through the series. It was at a time (late 60s/early 70s) when Tolkein's popularity had inspired the publishing (mainly by Ballantine Books) of a whole raft of fantasy books by lesser known, but still very good authors such as William Morris, Lord Dunsany. and E.R. Eddison. C.S. Lewis's Perelandra series was less adventerous and "wonderous" compared to the other fantasy books. I still have about 70 paperbacks of that genre in my library and haven't touched most of them since I read them over 30 years ago. Might give the Perelandra series a try again as a do like C.S. Lewis as a writer.

BTW: I still think the best of the lot is Eddison's "The Worm Ouroboros" (even compared to Tolkein) once you can get past Eddison's "Elizabethan" prose style.

Gillianren
2005-Nov-29, 06:16 AM
Are there modern, and/or perhaps American, editions of the Narnia books with modified language at all? I don't think this dating of language is a problem, it was just something that I really noticed for the first time during my relatively recent re-reading of the entire series.

Actually, the current American editions restore, as I said, things changed in the older American editions. Those things changed tend to be minor, except, again, the name of Fenris Ulf (I'm curious which name they'll give him in the movie!) and the end of the Dark Island chapter (I'm too lazy to get up and get my copy to look up the chapter name/number) of Voyage of the Dawn Treader. However, blessedly, I know of no "updating" of Narnia and its language, I concept I find frankly appalling.

Lianachan
2005-Nov-29, 08:36 AM
However, blessedly, I know of no "updating" of Narnia and its language, I concept I find frankly appalling.Indeed. I would too. I only asked if you knew if such things existed, I wasn't suggesting that I'd prefer to read such abominations.

publiusr
2005-Dec-02, 11:04 PM
Yep, many years ago while in college. Preferred "Out of the Silent Planet" to "Perelandra" and "That Hideous Strength" and had difficulty slogging through the series. It was at a time (late 60s/early 70s) when Tolkein's popularity had inspired the publishing (mainly by Ballantine Books) of a whole raft of fantasy books by lesser known, but still very good authors such as William Morris, Lord Dunsany. and E.R. Eddison. C.S. Lewis's Perelandra series was less adventerous and "wonderous" compared to the other fantasy books. I still have about 70 paperbacks of that genre in my library and haven't touched most of them since I read them over 30 years ago. Might give the Perelandra series a try again as a do like C.S. Lewis as a writer.

BTW: I still think the best of the lot is Eddison's "The Worm Ouroboros" (even compared to Tolkein) once you can get past Eddison's "Elizabethan" prose style.

I also loved "Out of the Silent Planet" though the villian of the peace was a scientist and it seemed very anti-space exploration. But it did have a nice flow to it.

mugaliens
2005-Dec-03, 12:17 AM
I've enjoyed Lewis as a writer. I think the Lion, Witch, etc., enjoyed so much following because it's mystery, adventure, and the authority figure appeals to so many little children.

ngc3314
2005-Dec-03, 04:21 PM
I also loved "Out of the Silent Planet" though the villian of the peace was a scientist and it seemed very anti-space exploration. But it did have a nice flow to it.

There was a brief correspondence on this issue between Lewis and Clarke (hmm, that pairing sounds familiar). Lewis apparently had a great deal of sympathy for the view he expressed in one bit of writing about the extent of space being "God's quarantine regulation" and wondered if it might be a Bad Thing for humanity to go bursting out into the cosmos. Clarke, of course, begged to differ. Lewis finished one letter more or less writing, "I'm sure you're all very wicked people - but wouldn't the world be dull if we were all alike!". The letters (such few as survive) are wrapped up with stories by each illustrating their points in a volume called From Narnia to a Space Odyssey. Interestingly, early on, each wrote stories that you might attribute to the other.

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-04, 11:20 PM
... (late 60s/early 70s) when Tolkein's popularity ...

... compared to Tolkein) once you ...
What is it with that misspelling that makes it so hard to stamp out?
I've noticed it happening with Niels Borh as well (misspelled as Neils).

Joff
2005-Dec-04, 11:41 PM
What is it with that misspelling that makes it so hard to stamp out?
I've noticed it happening with Niels Borh as well (misspelled as Neils).Does Niels Bohr have the same problem too? ;)

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-06, 11:35 AM
Oops, that was a typo and not because I think that's how it's spelled.

parallaxicality
2005-Dec-06, 11:55 AM
How interesting that Arthur C Clarke, who wrote one of the difinitive works of atheist fiction, Childhood's End, was a correspondant of CS Lewis!

It's things like that that make the agnostic in me happy. We can all get along. And can I say how refreshing it is to see such a determinedly unreligious board as this take on Lewis without descending into spite and fury, as seems to be happening over on the IMDB board with a depressing regularity.

Oh, and I've been thinking of reading The Screwtape Letters; can I have a secularist's view on it?

ToSeek
2005-Dec-06, 04:12 PM
Oh, and I've been thinking of reading The Screwtape Letters; can I have a secularist's view on it?

I'm as secularist as they come, and I think The Screwtape Letters is great. It's really very humanist in tone, at least more than you'd expect, focusing more on how you should behave in this world rather than how you should prepare yourself for the next. There are numerous exceptions, of course, but even those are interesting in how Lewis sees them and presents them.

GDwarf
2005-Dec-06, 10:05 PM
The Screwtape letters are very good, and rather insightful, about the little things that add up to being 'damned', the interesting thing about them is that, odds are, you know people who match the characters/ have the same problems as the characters.