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Candy
2005-Nov-29, 07:27 AM
Kiss of Death (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10243950/)

SAGUENAY, Quebec - A 15-year-old girl with a peanut allergy died after kissing her boyfriend, who had just eaten a peanut butter snack, hospital officials said Monday.

About 1.5 million Americans are severely allergic to even the smallest trace of peanuts and peanut allergies account for 50 to 100 deaths in the United States each year. Canadian figures were not immediately available.
What a sad story. I just don’t understand why certain people, me included, are allergic to “things”.

Philip A
2005-Nov-29, 07:41 AM
I don't think anyone knows for sure. One of the current hypotheses is a hyper reaction when the T cells overreact, possibly caused by too much disinfectant when we're young. Because of overprotective parents, we have little exposure to germs, so the T cells treat everything new as something to attack.

All of which seems plausible enough (explains the rise in allergies over the last few years, and the vast discrepancy between 'developed' and 'developing' worlds) but doesn't explain why I, for example, am allergic to the skins of tomatoes, but not the rest of them....

As I said, I don't think anyone knows for certain!

Enzp
2005-Nov-29, 07:47 AM
That is sad. SOme alergies are downright bizarre. I guess that is why we get pretzels instead of nuts on the planes any more.

Candy
2005-Nov-29, 07:58 AM
I don't think anyone knows for sure. One of the current hypotheses is a hyper reaction when the T cells overreact, possibly caused by too much disinfectant when we're young. Because of overprotective parents, we have little exposure to germs, so the T cells treat everything new as something to attack.

All of which seems plausible enough (explains the rise in allergies over the last few years, and the vast discrepancy between 'developed' and 'developing' worlds) but doesn't explain why I, for example, am allergic to the skins of tomatoes, but not the rest of them....

As I said, I don't think anyone knows for certain!
I never had my first awareness of an allergic reaction to something (age 36), until I went into surgery for a "personal reason". I was hooked up to a breathing thing, and became severely allergic to the plastic in my nose or the "oxygen". I'm still not sure what happened.

I think I'm allergic to alcohol (the kind you drink), too.

LurchGS
2005-Nov-29, 08:11 AM
I don't know how old everybody is here, but if you were born in the late 50s or the 60s, it's quite likely you were fed formula instead of breastmilk (science is better than nature, yadda yadda yadda)

There have been a number of studies (I'm told) that link asthma (of which I am a proud supporter) to this 'scientific' feeding. I think I've heard that many allergies show some links to it, too.

I think over-medication is also to blame. Got a sniffle? Here, drink this bottle of sudaphed. etc.

And finally, I think poor nutrition also plays a significan role.

ooops, and really finally, some allergies are a result of overexposure. Latex, for example. My wife is a paramedic. After 5 years in the profession, she's violently allergic to latex - the merest touch raises welts. Continued contact or inhalation of the dust results in laryngeal spasms - without epinepherin, she's in deep deep kimchee

jkmccrann
2005-Nov-29, 09:19 AM
Kiss of Death (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10243950/)


What a sad story. I just don’t understand why certain people, me included, are allergic to “things”.

That is bizarre and sad Candy, :( . Allergies are not something we've ever had a problem with in our family, but reading what Phil A said


I don't think anyone knows for sure. One of the current hypotheses is a hyper reaction when the T cells overreact, possibly caused by too much disinfectant when we're young. Because of overprotective parents, we have little exposure to germs, so the T cells treat everything new as something to attack.


that half rings true, because my folks have certainly never been over-protective. More, get out there and enjoy yourself. Which is definitely the way I'd go about raising any kids of mine, and encouraging them to get out and about, sailing, sporting, hiking, surfing etc. etc. etc.

All very enjoyable, and all very good for you. :)

Maksutov
2005-Nov-29, 09:39 AM
I saw that in a pop-up ad during Monday Night Football. Nothing like trying to enjoy a game, and being informed that a young girl had died of an allergic reaction. Too bad.

That reminds me, the same station a few weeks ago had another pop-up ad for their news show during MNF that reported that a high school cheerleader had fallen off a float and had been crushed to death. I don't mind news, even the rotten variety (i.e., ~99% of the news), but when I'm watching a football game, that's what I want to watch. Time to send that station an email re their intrusive pop-up ads. Enough already.

For me, peanuts, etc., are OK, but it turns out I'm allergic to a particular type of mold that can grow on peanuts. I found this out when what turned out to be an old Snickers bar (my lunch that day), which had been in a vending machine for some time (no FIFO apparently), almost did me in. Hives from head to toe, histamine production to supply a hundred people, and swelling of just about every membrane to the point where my larynx and trachea were closing.

Fortunately the company medical staff got me to the emergency room before I suffocated. The remnants of the Snickers bar were analyzed and mold was found on the peanuts. Apparently it was related, as far as my body was concerned, to penicillin mold. An injection of penicillin almost killed me when I was 19.

Allergies are peculiar things.

kylenano
2005-Nov-29, 10:55 AM
There's also the suggestion that people become sensitised because peanut oil is used in skin creams. Except it's not called peanut oil, it's called arachis oil, so it's not obvious that it's made from peanuts.

I found this through Google: Peanut and nut allergy (http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/313/7052/299)

...although no evidence exists of specific induction of peanut allergy by this route, I prefer not to recommend the use of creams or ointments that contain arachis oil.

Swift
2005-Nov-29, 03:47 PM
This isn't anything new, though I don't know if it is getting more common (and it doesn't make the story about the girl less sad).

Twenty years ago when I was an EMT, I treated a patient who had asthma and a peanut allergy. They had tasted a small spoonful of chili that, unknown to them, had been made with peanut oil. By the time I saw the patient, about 10 minutes after exposure, they were close to respiratory arrest. Our squad had just started carrying Epinephrine (adrenaline) and I administered it. The doctor at the ED said I probably kept the patient out of arrest and may have saved his life. The case was actually written up in the state EMS newsletter, as one of the first uses of Epi in the field (by an EMT) in Rhode Island. One of my prouder moments (you can tell, can't you :o )

SolusLupus
2005-Nov-29, 04:17 PM
I don't know how old everybody is here, but if you were born in the late 50s or the 60s, it's quite likely you were fed formula instead of breastmilk (science is better than nature, yadda yadda yadda)

I'd be the first to debate that science will be, potentially, better than nature. It's especially better when you realize the limitations of current science; formula milk does not carry with it the immunizations of breastmilk. However, eventually, we may easily be able to implant those immunizations into formula.

Also, we may be able to, someday in the far future, put humans through the gene therapy required to rid them of allergies altogether.

Dark Jaguar
2005-Nov-29, 05:02 PM
I had heard before that allergies are caused by a random, though rare, forming of T cells when a new particle is introduced. The difference between this and what's listed above is the show in question never mentioned something like lack of exposure to various infectious agents as a child leading to these mutations, just that they sometimes occur as a random mutation, the harmful variety in this case. However, there may be a benefit in the form of such random mutations allowing someone to become immune to something the body previously couldn't fight off, right? I dunno, that's why I ask.

I myself have a number of grass allergies. Nothing fatal, fortunatly, but all annoying. All my allergies take the form of horrible rashes. I am overly sensitive to things like poison ivy/oak/sumac, and also have a pretty nasty skin reaction to ragweed. I say "am" but ever since a rather itchy and painful childhood I've managed to avoid exposure to these plants for many years. I am completely uncertain as to whether or not I even still have the rash end of the allergies. I do still itch when in contact with most plant material though. The other end, the standard nasal allergies, are pretty much a constant menace, but not consistant. I should probably pay more attention to the weathermn's spore count announcements.

Sammy
2005-Nov-29, 06:33 PM
I had the odd experience of losing what had been a chronic allergy -- to cats. All my life, I could not be in a house with a resident cat for more than a few minutes without having my eyes tear, itch, and close up. It ocurred even when I had no idea a cat was present. Dogs werenot a problem.

In my 50s, it just stopped. When we first looked at the home in which I now live, I found that the then-owners had five cats. I warned the real estate agent that I couldn't stay very long. After 15 minutes, I realized that I was not reacting. I ended up talking to the owners with one of their cats on my lap.

Never been bothered again, and we now have the cat that came out of the woods and adopted us 3 years ago happily in residence.

sts60
2005-Nov-29, 07:41 PM
I don't know how old everybody is here, but if you were born in the late 50s or the 60s, it's quite likely you were fed formula instead of breastmilk (science is better than nature, yadda yadda yadda)

Mid-60s, and I don't remember ;) . But I only have a few "hay fever" type allergies, which have been pretty consistent as long as I remember.

There have been a number of studies (I'm told) that link asthma (of which I am a proud supporter)

You're a proud supporter of asthma? You sicko!

Sorry, couldn't resist.

to this 'scientific' feeding. I think I've heard that many allergies show some links to it, too.

I think over-medication is also to blame. Got a sniffle? Here, drink this bottle of sudaphed. etc.

And finally, I think poor nutrition also plays a significan role.

ooops, and really finally, some allergies are a result of overexposure.

My lay opinion is that there's probably some complex combination of all of these, plus genetic dispositions, that will take a lot more work to unravel.

Latex, for example. My wife is a paramedic. After 5 years in the profession, she's violently allergic to latex - the merest touch raises welts. Continued contact or inhalation of the dust results in laryngeal spasms - without epinepherin, she's in deep deep kimchee

Mmmmm..... kimchee.... Huh? Oh, right. I assume your wife uses nitrile gloves or the like now? I like them better than latex anyway.

Oh, and Swift - nice save! :clap:

Big Brother Dunk
2005-Nov-29, 07:43 PM
A very tragic story. I can't imagine how a parent would feel.

Titana
2005-Nov-29, 08:18 PM
Yes, very sad. Years ago i heard of a pregnant woman who choked to death on peanut butter, but this is the first time i ever heard someone really die because of an alergic reaction to peanut butter.

The only thing i can recall being alergic to is sea food. Although i dont quite understand why. Years ago i use to eat all kinds of sea food, up until the day i quess as the doctor told me i ate a bad fish. Well i sure dont know what was wrong with the fish i ate but it got me very ill. The doctor mentioned something about some kind of intoxocation from some kind a chemical that the fish had.
But anyway i was in the hospital for a least three days do to that and every since then i am very sensitive to sea food, i just cant eat it with out getting sick again.....



Titana.......

LurchGS
2005-Nov-29, 08:28 PM
I'd be the first to debate that science will be, potentially, better than nature. It's especially better when you realize the limitations of current science; formula milk does not carry with it the immunizations of breastmilk. However, eventually, we may easily be able to implant those immunizations into formula.

Also, we may be able to, someday in the far future, put humans through the gene therapy required to rid them of allergies altogether.

No argument - the important part of that paragraph was the 'yadda yadda' - by which I meant to indicate that the prevailing attitude of the time was full of balloon fuel. It's rather like the *still* prevalent notion that babyshoes have to be hard soled and flat 'to force the child's heel to the floor' and so 'they don't develop problems walking' . Excuse me, just how the heck did we learn to walk during the past 3 million years (give or take 6 weeks, 2 days and 17 hours)?

Sorry, I'm ranting again.

suffice to say, my kids are normally dirty, were breastfed (not by me, fortunately) and didn't have shoes until they'd already learned to walk. They seem pretty healthy and well adjusted to me (for an 11 year old and a 13 year old)

SolusLupus
2005-Nov-29, 08:35 PM
Oh, okay. I see what you mean then. That's kinda like pseudoscience, though.

turbo-1
2005-Nov-29, 08:46 PM
Lots of these things are called "allergies" when they are actually toxic reactions. I have a severe "allergy" to fragrance chemicals, and it comes on almost instantaneously - too fast for histamine production to ramp up. If I get near somebody wearing any fragranced cosmetics, fabric softeners, etc, with just one or two breaths my lungs fill with mucus, I get a migraine and my blood pressure spikes dangerously high. After that subsides (many miserable hours later) my joints ache for a couple of days, making it painful to walk.

People with this sensitivity are the "canaries in the coal mine". Why do you think childhood asthma is on the rise? Could it be the chemical soup we make those little fellas breathe? Before you wash your children's clothes in scented detergent and dry it with scented fabric sheets, ask yourself if it's a good idea to make them breathe these chemicals all day. Remember that many of their friends and classmates come to school loaded with scents, too, so they're getting multiple exposures. Some places in Canada have figured this out and have made public buildings "fragrance free".

Beware of "unscented" products. Many of them (like Unscented Oil of Olay moisturizing lotion) contain high concentrations of masking fragrances that are really dangerous because they are very potent, but hard to smell, so you can't easily detect and avoid them. Just check the labels and choose products that say "fragrance free". It's the best thing you can do for your children's respiratory health, along with tossing all air-fresheners and other room-poisoning products.

Swift
2005-Nov-29, 09:01 PM
<snip>
to this 'scientific' feeding. I think I've heard that many allergies show some links to it, too.

I think over-medication is also to blame. Got a sniffle? Here, drink this bottle of sudaphed. etc.

And finally, I think poor nutrition also plays a significan role.

ooops, and really finally, some allergies are a result of overexposure.

My lay opinion is that there's probably some complex combination of all of these, plus genetic dispositions, that will take a lot more work to unravel.

I agree (though I'm no MD or medical expert). I suspect that like antibiotics were one of the triumphs of medicine in the 20th century, understanding and controlling the immune system will be the triumph of 21st. So many medical problems are caused by either hyperactivity (auto-immune diseases) or under-activity (cancer, viral diseases) of the immune system. I also suspect it is a complex interaction of genetics and environmental exposures. And I also suspect that the environmental aspect is not just a question of whether you are exposed to something or not, but is a complex function of substances (with interactions), time, concentration, etc.

I know many people who have had allergies change over time - my Mom overcame a childhood allergy to chocolate to become a world class chocoholic; I have seasonal allergies that appear to be slowly getting worse with time :( .

And thanks for the high-five sts60.

Candy
2005-Nov-29, 09:59 PM
Lots of these things are called "allergies" when they are actually toxic reactions. I have a severe "allergy" to fragrance chemicals, and it comes on almost instantaneously - too fast for histamine production to ramp up. If I get near somebody wearing any fragranced cosmetics, fabric softeners, etc, with just one or two breaths my lungs fill with mucus, I get a migraine and my blood pressure spikes dangerously high. After that subsides (many miserable hours later) my joints ache for a couple of days, making it painful to walk.

People with this sensitivity are the "canaries in the coal mine". Why do you think childhood asthma is on the rise? Could it be the chemical soup we make those little fellas breathe? Before you wash your children's clothes in scented detergent and dry it with scented fabric sheets, ask yourself if it's a good idea to make them breathe these chemicals all day. Remember that many of their friends and classmates come to school loaded with scents, too, so they're getting multiple exposures. Some places in Canada have figured this out and have made public buildings "fragrance free".

Beware of "unscented" products. Many of them (like Unscented Oil of Olay moisturizing lotion) contain high concentrations of masking fragrances that are really dangerous because they are very potent, but hard to smell, so you can't easily detect and avoid them. Just check the labels and choose products that say "fragrance free". It's the best thing you can do for your children's respiratory health, along with tossing all air-fresheners and other room-poisoning products.
I'm not sure if I'm allergic to fragrances, but I only buy hypo-allergenic products anyway. My skin is just so sensitive to everything, true redhead, that I do this out of habit. On a similar note, I only wear "perfumes" on special occasions. I just don't understand why people wear them everyday. There were two women at work that wear strong perfumes. Someone complained, so they were told to tone it down. Thank goodness. It was fun for awhile to make fun of them. I'd say, "Didn't you shower today"? They'd role their eyes at me. http://www.bautforum.com/images/icons/icon10.gif

LurchGS
2005-Nov-29, 10:17 PM
Lots of these things are called "allergies" when they are actually toxic reactions. I have a severe "allergy" to fragrance chemicals, and it comes on almost instantaneously - too fast for histamine production to ramp up. If I get near somebody wearing any fragranced cosmetics, fabric softeners, etc, with just one or two breaths my lungs fill with mucus, I get a migraine and my blood pressure spikes dangerously high. After that subsides (many miserable hours later) my joints ache for a couple of days, making it painful to walk.

People with this sensitivity are the "canaries in the coal mine". Why do you think childhood asthma is on the rise? Could it be the chemical soup we make those little fellas breathe? Before you wash your children's clothes in scented detergent and dry it with scented fabric sheets, ask yourself if it's a good idea to make them breathe these chemicals all day. Remember that many of their friends and classmates come to school loaded with scents, too, so they're getting multiple exposures. Some places in Canada have figured this out and have made public buildings "fragrance free".

Beware of "unscented" products. Many of them (like Unscented Oil of Olay moisturizing lotion) contain high concentrations of masking fragrances that are really dangerous because they are very potent, but hard to smell, so you can't easily detect and avoid them. Just check the labels and choose products that say "fragrance free". It's the best thing you can do for your children's respiratory health, along with tossing all air-fresheners and other room-poisoning products.


well paint me yellow and stick feathers in my.... hair. I'm not THAT sensitive to scents... but occasionally I end up near some woman who insists on using perfume in what I call "the flea dip method". More than once I've had to bail out of an elevator because of one of these daisies. When, oh when, are women going to realize that pefume is most effective when the guy can *almost* smell it? Smelling like a cheap whore is NOT a good thing. Unless you want to kill me, of course.

We Do use unscented stuff, as much as possible... but another issue is the use of cleaning stuff with the windows closed (a problem I don't have - my house is as airtight as OJ's alibi)

And finally (for this post). Indoor wall to wall carpet is EVIL. remove it at once!

Candy
2005-Nov-29, 10:32 PM
And finally (for this post). Indoor wall to wall carpet is EVIL. remove it at once!
Where were you when I gutted this condo? I had beige carpet installed. I never knew the evils of new carpet. There should be a warning label or something before one buys the stuff.

LurchGS
2005-Nov-29, 10:40 PM
y know, I actually agree with you there. Every carpet outgasses - though those of natural fiber (wool, etc) are less noxious. man made fibers release minute quantities of god knows what.
On top of that, carpet traps dirt. There's a commercial that claims carpets are 5 times dirtier than teh street outside. It's right. (I used to clean carpets professionally). The best you can do is let them trap less crud.

My Mother vacuums every day. After 3 years, she and dad decided to replace the carpet. When they pulled it up, the floor underneath was literally covered in dirt and ... stuff. It was *nasty*. It was high quality carpet and high quality padding. made no difference.

On top of that, can you really say that some fuzzy fabric looks better than even cheap hardwood?

Dragon Star
2005-Nov-29, 10:41 PM
Yes, very sad. Years ago i heard of a pregnant woman who choked to death on peanut butter, but this is the first time i ever heard someone really die because of an allergic reaction to peanut butter.

The only thing i can recall being allergic to is sea food. Although i don't quite understand why. Years ago i use to eat all kinds of sea food, up until the day i guess as the doctor told me i ate a bad fish. Well i sure don't know what was wrong with the fish i ate but it got me very ill. The doctor mentioned something about some kind of intoxication from some kind a chemical that the fish had.
But anyway i was in the hospital for a least three days do to that and every since then i am very sensitive to sea food, i just cant eat it with out getting sick again.....



Titana.......

I also am allergic to some sea food, it's weird, I was 7 and was eating shrimp at a restaurant with my family, all the sudden my throat was itchy, REALLY itchy, so I started to swallow to get it to go away, my throat swelled up severely and I could barely breathe, I thought I was going to die...very scary. But the weird part is shrimp is like the ONLY thing I am allergic to as far as sea food goes, I eat King Crab legs all the time...and the only thing I get is a slight tingle if I eat allot of it....which suggests I may be severely allergic to it in the future I am told, always wondered why that happens.

On a some-what related note, I went with one of my friends to Captain D's night before last,(keep in mind he is a big fella...I mean BIG!) he got the all you can eat fried shrimp.....I have never seen such a thing in my life. I still can not believe this is possible, but he ate 502 fried shrimp....the entire place was circled around our table and was chanting him on...one of the guys said that 502 fried shrimp equals roughly 12-15lbs! Amazing! I know this is true because I watched him do it, but I just can't fathom this...502, and he never got sick:surprised. Makes me wonder if I was dreaming!

Jorge
2005-Nov-29, 10:58 PM
I haven't found anything that i'm alergic too (yet).
Although i easly get a cold and i'm coughing 80% of the year.

I work with computer a lot and lately i've been starting to notice If i touch the silicon boards to much my hands turn redish... I only get it with colord boards I don't have it with the plain green once, nor with the black, but i do get it with yellow, orangish, red and blue boards... I sopose its something in the colering chemical use.

Gullible Jones
2005-Nov-30, 01:01 AM
Allergies kind of dumbfound me. Inflamation is understandable, as it performs a useful function, but you'd think that the body would go to great lengths to limit inflamation in the airways. The only good explanation I can come up with is that aniphylactic responses are the result of bugs that evolution has not (yet) weeded out of our immune systems.

(And people wonder why I'm a genetic engineering proponent. GE might be the only way to cure physiological bugs like this, and the woo-woos are against it every step of the way. Grrr.)

paulie jay
2005-Nov-30, 01:18 AM
In Australian schools and childcare centres peanuts and peanut butter is now banned and there have also been severe requests that parents don't feed their children peanut butter before school - just to be on the safe side in case some is still attached to them when they get to school.

I did read somewhere (and I wish I could be more specific about the source) that the reason why more people react to peanuts these days is due to the preparation. The article stated that peanuts are roasted at a different temperature these days, and at this new temperature more of the culprit chemical that causes reaction is released.

It may have been hogwash - I can't even remeber where I read it.

Doodler
2005-Nov-30, 01:25 AM
I've aquired an allergy to penicillin. I had always taken penicillin or its variants for different illnesses when I was growing up (probably more often than I should have, but that's the way this culture works, unfortunately), and a couple years ago, I took Keflex, a derivative, and my throat swelled. My uvula was hanging into my airway, threatening my ability to breath. I drove myself to the hospital, forcing my self to swallow to force my uvula up out of my airway, then was given a benadryl injection and told to avoid penicillin ever again.

Very odd.

Apothis
2005-Nov-30, 01:49 AM
This thread reminded me about something my brother told me last week when I went back to Houston for Thanksgiving. He was on a southwest airlines flight from Orlando to Houston Hobby airport, and they couldn't serve peanuts on the flight because a certain passenger had a severe allergy to peanuts, so they gave out pretzels instead. But it is pretty sad that a simple alergy such as that can cause death.

Candy
2005-Nov-30, 02:16 AM
This thread reminded me about something my brother told me last week when I went back to Houston for Thanksgiving. He was on a southwest airlines flight from Orlando to Houston Hobby airport, and they couldn't serve peanuts on the flight because a certain passenger had a severe allergy to peanuts, so they gave out pretzels instead. But it is pretty sad that a simple alergy such as that can cause death.
United used to serve peanuts on their flights. Back when I first started, 1997, I remember when customer's would call requesting a no peanut flight. We would accommodate. I'm not sure if it became so numerous or expensive that we just stopped serving peanuts altogether. If you call Southwest, and you get lucky enough to be on hold, you will hear "Peanuts, peanuts, peanuts" as one of their advertisements. Having an evil bone in my body, I thought they were saying something else at first. I think they want you to think the same way. ;) Southwest has some of the funniest ads. Yes, I stalk other airlines, and I get paid to do it. :)

Candy
2005-Nov-30, 02:34 AM
Allergies kind of dumbfound me. Inflamation is understandable, as it performs a useful function, but you'd think that the body would go to great lengths to limit inflamation in the airways. The only good explanation I can come up with is that aniphylactic responses are the result of bugs that evolution has not (yet) weeded out of our immune systems.

(And people wonder why I'm a genetic engineering proponent. GE might be the only way to cure physiological bugs like this, and the woo-woos are against it every step of the way. Grrr.)
That's what I went into, aniphylactic shock with the tube up my nose. I started itching uncontrollably. The last thing I remember was saying, "I'm not sure why I am scratching, but..." I then only remember waking up feeling real good (pain killers). I did ask what exactly happened. They told me. After the drugs wore off, I was in terrible pain (not just from the surgery). They must have rough-housed me during or after surgery, because I had some serious bruises on me. I didn't want to know, so I didn't ask about that part. Oh yeah, my throat was scratched up pretty bad. They had to administer oxygen to me an alternative way.

Gullible Jones
2005-Nov-30, 03:11 AM
Sorry, missspelled, it's "anaphylactic". And apparently it actually involves constriction of the muscles around the bronchial tubes, if you can believe that. Now, inflamation of the respiratory tract I get, but I have no idea at all why the body would suddenly decide to suffocate itself.

wayneee
2005-Nov-30, 03:21 AM
I coached Youth Football this year. Out of 29 kids on my squad I had 8 with inhalers. When I was a kid , I recall maybe one kid in my whole school with an inhaler. I did take notice as I coached these kids , as I became a (hard ***) on them, pushing them to thier limits, trying to teach thier bodies how to move in that brief window you have in extreme fatique and collaspe. Thier dependancy on the inhalers started to decrease. I of course monitored them well, and watched thier breathing, took pulses discretly. But if I did not buy into thier overly protective medical practices, they almost became normal. Can we speculate on over diagnosis
As for Peanut Allergies, nothing beats the kiss recieved from a bee. There is a case of one contact equals death. The Peanut kiss is high drama, but it is not surprizing. Bee Deaths account for the most deaths delivered by any allergic reaction.

Candy
2005-Nov-30, 03:22 AM
Sorry, missspelled, it's "anaphylactic". And apparently it actually involves constriction of the muscles around the bronchial tubes, if you can believe that. Now, inflamation of the respiratory tract I get, but I have no idea at all why the body would suddenly decide to suffocate itself.
I copied you, so I misspelled it, too. :lol:

I just couldn't remember what it was called.

Gullible Jones
2005-Nov-30, 03:24 AM
And you just missspelled "missspelled" too. :P

Anyway... Does anyone know the reason for the bronchial constriction responce? As I said, inflamation makes sense, but purposeful suffocation seems quite counterintuitive, to say the least.

Candy
2005-Nov-30, 03:25 AM
Sorry, missspelled, it's "anaphylactic". And apparently it actually involves constriction of the muscles around the bronchial tubes, if you can believe that. Now, inflamation of the respiratory tract I get, but I have no idea at all why the body would suddenly decide to suffocate itself.
Oh yeah, they must have jammed a tube down my "already swollen" throat to make it so freaking sore afterwards. :(

Candy
2005-Nov-30, 03:29 AM
And you just missspelled "missspelled" too. :P

Anyway... Does anyone know the reason for the bronchial constriction responce? As I said, inflamation makes sense, but purposeful suffocation seems quite counterintuitive, to say the least.
No, you misspelled misspelled. I just quoted from you. Are you trying to confuse me young computer genius? :shifty:

teri tait
2005-Nov-30, 03:48 AM
Nothing so fun as being intubated. I was no pulse, no ticker when I had asthma attack. I felt itchy too but I think that was the body reaction to stress. My blood sugar went through the roof & the doctors didn't even think it was asthma, they though I was diabetic coma.
Freakin' doctors...

Candy
2005-Nov-30, 04:09 AM
Nothing so fun as being intubated. I was no pulse, no ticker when I had asthma attack. I felt itchy too but I think that was the body reaction to stress. My blood sugar went through the roof & the doctors didn't even think it was asthma, they though I was diabetic coma.
Freakin' doctors...
I'm glad you are okay now, Teri Tait! I like you. :)

TheBlackCat
2005-Nov-30, 04:28 AM
I don't have any food allergies, although my mother does (cabbage, of all things). Her allergy to cabbage is not serious, she can eat small amounts safely and may even be over it by now (although she doesn't want to test it).

However, I am allergic to just about anything with fur or feathers. I no longer touch dogs or cats. The worst, however random, are horses and guniea pigs. At camp when I was in middle school we went on a horse-riding trip. Within an hour my eyes had swollen up, my nose was running like a faucet, and my breathing was difficult. I was in the infirmary for 3 days. When I was at a friend's house in Argentina (long story), I played with their pet guinea pig. It lightly ran its claws along my arm. Within about 20 minutes my nose was running, my eyes were inflamed, and I had massive welts on my arms where its claws had touched them. I had nearly constant allergies when we had our parrot, Ghosty, that stopped soon after we gave him away. I also have allergies to pollen (especially oak tree pollen) and dust mites. I get really bad allergies after working in our garage for a few hours. That is one intersting thing. Nobody is allergic to dust. Everybody who thinks they are allergic to dust are really allergic to the dust mites that get stirred up with the dust.

My dad has similar allergies, except for one: he is deathly allergic to fire ants. He always carries an up-to-date epinepherine injector with him just on the off chance he runs into a fire ant nest. The first time he had it, I was at one of my sailing regattas and he had been kayaking. He got bitten by a fire ant and his throat and tongue swelled a lot, and the rest of his body swelled noticably. There was red tide so we all assumed it was reaction to that. Luckily EMS knew better or he probably would have died. Apparently that sort of thing is common in our area, so he has to be really careful where he walks.

My sister was allergic to milk as a child (she took tums for calcium instead), but it went away after a few years. She doesn't have any other allergies.

Everybody who I tell that I can't eat chocolate or nuts assume I have allergies. I actually can't eat chocolate because it gives me migraines, and I can't eat nuts because I hate them and if I try to eat something I hate I always throw up (or if I try to eat when I'm not hungry).

Swift
2005-Nov-30, 07:06 AM
Anyway... Does anyone know the reason for the bronchial constriction responce? As I said, inflamation makes sense, but purposeful suffocation seems quite counterintuitive, to say the least.
Bad design? :p
(sorry, wrong thread) ;)

Robert Andersson
2005-Nov-30, 10:58 AM
Everybody who I tell that I can't eat chocolate or nuts assume I have allergies. I actually can't eat chocolate because it gives me migraines, and I can't eat nuts because I hate them and if I try to eat something I hate I always throw up (or if I try to eat when I'm not hungry).
I can relate to that. I usually get headache, extremely thirsty and feel sick of chocolate, especially the dark variety. "Milk chocolate", or whatever it is called, is not so bad, but I'm happy without it. I'm not especially fond of peanuts either, nor "snacks" in general.

sts60
2005-Nov-30, 05:34 PM
Random -

Every carpet outgasses - though those of natural fiber (wool, etc) are less noxious.

Until you burn it, when the wool merrily produces cyanide gas. Of course, if your carpet is on fire, you probably have additional problems.

Southwest has some of the funniest ads.

Having lived in Houston a long time, I always liked SWA. One time, during a stop, a flight attendant (who happened to sound British) asked continuing passengers to remain seated for a head count. A couple of minutes later, he came back on the PA and said "Look, I've asked you once to remain seated. Now sit down or I'll break your bloody legs."

Ilya
2005-Nov-30, 05:46 PM
Peanuts seems to be the most common SEVERE allergy.

I have a severe allergy to fish -- not to "seafood", but specifically to protein of the class Pisces. Fish also smells very bad to me, so it is very unlikely that I would accidentally eat enough of it to send me into anaphylactic shock. One bonus is that I can tell "real seafood" (crabs, etc. which I like a lot) from "fake seafood" just by smell. That particular allergy is inherited -- my uncle has it to even greater degree than I do. BTW, he is an immunologist, and spent an inordinate amount of time researching this important to him topic.

As an aside, for years I could not understand why people say menstruation smells like fish. To me two scents are very different (and the former not nearly as unpleasant). Took a long time to realize that everyone else perceives fish smell the way I perceive... never mind :)

Gullible Jones
2005-Nov-30, 09:37 PM
I wonder what it is in peanuts that provokes such a severe reaction. Maybe one of the proteins mimicks some natural protein-based toxin, or the surface protein of some bacterium or virus? That would explain why such severe allergies are still around, if they're a genetic phenomenon.

(Any enlightenment on the self-suffocation response? Beskep? FP? Anyone know what that could possibly be good for?)

Dragon Star
2005-Dec-01, 12:51 AM
I wonder what it is in peanuts that provokes such a severe reaction. Maybe one of the proteins mimicks some natural protein-based toxin, or the surface protein of some bacterium or virus? That would explain why such severe allergies are still around, if they're a genetic phenomenon.

If true everyone would be affected though....so there is something else involved.:neutral:

Gullible Jones
2005-Dec-01, 01:44 AM
Not necessarily. Sickle cell anemia is still around because having only one set of genes for it gives you some resistance to malaria.

You are right in that my idea doesn't quite hold up though. I don't think, anyway...

Hugh Jass
2005-Dec-01, 02:28 AM
My understanding was/is that food allergies, and some others, have to do with lacking the correct enzymes to deal with certain proteins. Milk is a really good example. Through our life we develop and lose three enzymes, one as a new born that gives way to a second (I think it has to do with when you start to lose baby teeth, but don’t remember where I heard that association) the third happens as puberty is ending and is present through adult hood. This is why for a milk allergy you can grow out of or into it depending on if you develop that particular enzyme or not.

As for anaphylactic shock, again I’m going off of very old memories, but I thought it had something to do with muscle proteins and the body reacting to the invading threat, kind of a lock down mechanism. Bad design? Advantage? There isn’t any, this is one of those cases that our smarts and humanism has overcome a genetic disadvantage

Gullible Jones
2005-Dec-01, 03:09 AM
I don't know... I don't see how a "lock down" mechanism would develope and stay around if it had no benefits.

(Maybe lesser degrees of bronchial constriction are useful under certain conditions, and what you see with asthma and peanut allergies is a runaway version of a potentially helpful response, as with inflamation? I can't figure out any condition under which shrinking airways would fail to do more harm than good, though.)


My understanding was/is that food allergies, and some others, have to do with lacking the correct enzymes to deal with certain proteins. Milk is a really good example. Through our life we develop and lose three enzymes, one as a new born that gives way to a second (I think it has to do with when you start to lose baby teeth, but don’t remember where I heard that association) the third happens as puberty is ending and is present through adult hood. This is why for a milk allergy you can grow out of or into it depending on if you develop that particular enzyme or not.

Those aren't allergies. An allergy is characterized by an overly agressive immune response to a foreign substance.