PDA

View Full Version : Teeny Tiny Solar System



Fraser
2005-Dec-01, 04:55 PM
SUMMARY: Astronomers from Penn State University and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics have found a miniature solar system in the making. A failed star with a hundredth the mass of our own Sun seems to have a planet forming disc of dust and gas surrounding it. With only 8 times the mass of Jupiter, this brown dwarf star is more like a large planet, and yet it's capable of forming a planetary system of its own.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/failed_star_system.html)
What do you think about this story? post your comments below.

Doodler
2005-Dec-01, 07:38 PM
Unsurprising, I think its safe to call Jupiter's moon system a form of "mini-star system". As long as there's excess material left after formation for these larger bodies, some kind of disk is going to be there.

jhwegener
2005-Dec-01, 08:38 PM
How big could such a system be and still undetected, if it is closer than our nearest known stellar neighbour (Proxima C?)?
Is there strong theoretical arguments against a system above a certain size(if yes then what argument)?


SUMMARY: Astronomers from Penn State University and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics have found a miniature solar system in the making. A failed star with a hundredth the mass of our own Sun seems to have a planet forming disc of dust and gas surrounding it. With only 8 times the mass of Jupiter, this brown dwarf star is more like a large planet, and yet it's capable of forming a planetary system of its own.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/failed_star_system.html)
What do you think about this story? post your comments below.

galacsi
2005-Dec-02, 10:46 AM
How big could such a system be and still undetected, if it is closer than our nearest known stellar neighbour (Proxima C?)?
Is there strong theoretical arguments against a system above a certain size(if yes then what argument)?

Or can it be mistaken with a much farther object ? Only a comprehensive Parallax study can find the difference.

Grand_Lunar
2005-Dec-02, 05:12 PM
Read this also on NASA's website.
Shows that Jupiter's system could really be considerd a min-solar system in itself.

Curious as to what one would find there...

Greg
2005-Dec-03, 10:55 PM
I had the same thoughts as Doodler. Jupiter is a much smaller object, yet it has moons of significant size around it which clearly formed at the same time as the planet itself. The difference is that Jupiter formed from a disc of leftover material around a central star, whereas the dwarf in this system is the central star.
But still it only makes sense that star formation is a messy business and some matrerial would be leftover and not incorporated into the central star which would later coalesce into planets. Because of this logical argument, I was not really surprised by this finding.

Tim Thompson
2005-Dec-04, 04:28 AM
See the thread "Planetary-mass brown dwarf discovered (http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=35321)", on this very topic, and my post #5 (http://www.bautforum.com/showpost.php?p=616185&postcount=5) in that thread, which links to the published paper. Masses of such things can only be estimated from evolutionary models, and this one could be anything from 5 to 15 Jupiter masses. It has what appears to be a debris disk, or maybe even an accretion disk, but it is not known to have any large "moons" (or "planets") around it.

wayneee
2005-Dec-04, 08:10 AM
Two Gas Giants in our solar system, i start to wonder if thats a bit odd cosmicly. All that Star stuff, and no way to make one huge star with no Gas giants . The Two Gas Giants have always marveled me, frightening in some ways. I had as a child imagine that jupiter could suddenly blow up and become a sun if it were hit by a comet. Luckliy it happened in my life time and I got to watch it Not burst into flame.