PDA

View Full Version : Good Vibrations: Why Cats Purr



sarongsong
2005-Dec-10, 03:13 AM
"...Is there a difference between a cat's purr of contentment and the purr of a cat that's been injured? Apparently, there is no difference..."
Secret Sounds That Heal (http://www.life-enthusiast.com/treatment/healing/muggenthaler_sounds.htm)

Candy
2005-Dec-10, 03:32 AM
Hey, I feel like I read this somewhere. ;)

sarongsong
2005-Dec-10, 03:52 AM
Yeah (sheepish grin), too much of a good article to be a hijacker.

Candy
2005-Dec-10, 04:19 AM
According to Elizabeth, that statement is an old veterinarian's adage and it's still taught in veterinary schools to this day. That's the first thing she came across when she started out with this research. But no one has done any studies on it. The type of frequencies that are found in the cat's purr are good for healing muscle, tendon, and ligament injuries, as well as for muscle strengthening and toning. They are good for any type of joint injury, wound healing, reduction of infection and swelling, pain relief, and relief of chronic pulmonary disease.
My kitty has an infection now. By keeping her in my lap and purring, along with the antibiotics, should heal her quicker? :shifty:

sarongsong
2005-Dec-10, 04:59 AM
Looks like she's in pretty good hands already (you just know what I'd add to her drinking water)---what kind of infection, and does she still purr when not in your lap?

Candy
2005-Dec-10, 05:08 AM
She has a bladder infection. Oh, what a nightmare.

She purrs when I touch her or vice versa. She kisses my forehead a lot. By touch, that could be simply sleeping on my lap or beside me. She also purrs when she is cleaning herself.

When she first acquired me, it took along time to get her to purr. She was a stray and not human friendly.

Gullible Jones
2005-Dec-10, 06:42 AM
This is indeed old news, actually. In fact, there were some experiments with chickens involving plates that vibrated at the frequencies you're talking about, which IIRC did indeed promote bone growth.

(Hmmm... What exactly is it with chickens and things that vibrate? Why does this keep coming up?)

LurchGS
2005-Dec-10, 07:05 AM
isn't it obvious why cats purr? For the same reason dogs do that thing they do. Because they CAN!

sarongsong
2005-Dec-10, 07:19 AM
...along with the antibiotics, should heal her quicker?Well, you might want to look into ways of helping restore her (good and bad) bacteria as soon as the antibiotics are done; the bad tend to return first.

Candy
2005-Dec-10, 07:24 AM
Well, you might want to look into ways of helping restore her (good and bad) bacteria as soon as the antibiotics are done; the bad tend to return first.
It was my fault. I left last weekend. Normally, I have the neighbor feed her daily and pet her for 15 minutes or so. I thought I would just leave out enough food for three days. I think she felt abandoned and got sick. This happened when I moved two years ago. She doesn't like being left alone for longer than a day. I'm a bad mommy sometimes. :(

Now, have you heard of the Chia Cat Grass Planter?

Sammy
2005-Dec-10, 05:50 PM
I have read in several books about cats that purring iccurs when the cat feels intense emotion, either pleasant or unpleasant.

RE ultrasound/bone growth: this has been recognized for some time, to wit




In 1994, FDA approved the first ultrasound bone growth stimulator. The Sonic Accelerated Fracture Healing System (SAFHS) is for adults with small fractures in the lower leg or lower forearm. A cast or splint is used. It is the first stimulator for the treatment of fractures occurring within seven days before treatment. Studies suggest that mechanical forces of the ultrasound waves transform into electrical impulses as they travel through the tissues.

The SAFHS consists of a portable generator cabled to a small, square treatment module that emits ultrasound pulses at about the same low intensity as sonogram fetal monitors. In some instances, the patient may use the unit at home. Recommended treatment is 20 minutes once a day until the fracture heals.

The SAFHS is not for patients who need additional fixation or surgery, are pregnant or breast-feeding, have bone disease or circulatory problems, or take medicines that may adversely affect remodeling.

In studies, all treated patients--and especially older people--healed faster than those using a placebo. In those age 50 and older, arms healed 40 days faster, and legs 85 days faster. Six years' follow-up did not suggest long-term adverse effects

http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/396_bone.html

I personally doubt that a cat's purr has sufficient energy to inflence bone growth or any other biological process, but I can not cite evidence pro or con. I can say that I always feel relaxed after a seesion of rubbing the tummy of the cat that adopeted us and hearing her rumble at a "low boil" for 5 or 10 minutes.

Stregone
2005-Dec-10, 08:18 PM
Cats purr when they want attention. When they are injured, they would sure like some help, and when they are content they would sure like something else to be content with :)

Gullible Jones
2005-Dec-10, 08:29 PM
The SAFHS is not for patients who need additional fixation or surgery, are pregnant or breast-feeding, have bone disease or circulatory problems, or take medicines that may adversely affect remodeling.

What's with the contraindication in bold? The others seem quite logical, but we're talking about sound here, not chemical substances.

Sammy
2005-Dec-10, 10:29 PM
What's with the contraindication in bold? The others seem quite logical, but we're talking about sound here, not chemical substances.

I think the ultrasound may work by stimulating some hormone or other biochemical process which affects calcium mobilization and deposition. That could affect the production of breast milk or the breast milk composition itself, with adverse effects on the infant.

Gullible Jones
2005-Dec-10, 10:39 PM
Ahh... Affects how the body uses calcium... D'oh. Yes, that would explain it.

Candy
2005-Dec-11, 08:20 AM
Dumb question: why does my cat "make a bed" before lying down to sleep? I heard once that it was due to weening or lack of, but I'm not sure. Does this mean she was just a kitten when she got me? She was and still is around 5-6 pounds. She's a tiny cat - I call it inbred.

Swift
2005-Dec-12, 07:12 AM
I have been around cats all my life and I have never heard an injured cat purr. Maybe I just missed out, but this sounds like nonsense to me. I also agree with Sammy that it would not seem to be enough energy to impact healing.

I have often noticed that cats will purr while eating. This is consistent with an idea I heard years ago, that purring is a signal from a nursing kitten to its mom (and back, mom cats seem to purr while they are nursing).

Candy
2005-Dec-12, 07:26 AM
I have been around cats all my life and I have never heard an injured cat purr. Maybe I just missed out, but this sounds like nonsense to me. I also agree with Sammy that it would not seem to be enough energy to impact healing.
I have. My kitty was in such awful pain, and I didn't even realize it due to purring. She had an abscessed tooth, that has got to be painful, and a different vet simply popped the swelling to extract the infection. It wasn't until a year later that I took her to a different doctor for the same reason. The vet immediately said she had a bad tooth and recommended surgery. The tooth (fang) was pulled.

I'm still kicking myself for letting her go through a whole year in pain. :(

Lianachan
2005-Dec-12, 11:22 AM
Isn't it the case that the cat kingdom is divided into those that can purr (like domestic cats and some big cats) and those that can roar (like lions and some other big cats)? Meaning that cats that purr can't roar, and visa versa?

This isn't at all relevant to the discussion, but it's something that's always vaguely interested me. I suspect my little cat would love to be able to roar.

Swift
2005-Dec-12, 03:19 PM
Isn't it the case that the cat kingdom is divided into those that can purr (like domestic cats and some big cats) and those that can roar (like lions and some other big cats)? Meaning that cats that purr can't roar, and visa versa?

This isn't at all relevant to the discussion, but it's something that's always vaguely interested me. I suspect my little cat would love to be able to roar.
IIRC, lions can purr. I thought the cat kingdom was basically divided into cheetahs (which seem to be different than the others) and everything else. I recall several nature programs talking about the fact that the biggest difference for domesticated cats is their size.

Lianachan
2005-Dec-12, 03:30 PM
IIRC, lions can purr. I thought the cat kingdom was basically divided into cheetahs (which seem to be different than the others) and everything else. I recall several nature programs talking about the fact that the biggest difference for domesticated cats is their size.

San Diego Zoo claim that small cats can purr, but not roar (which, I don't think is disputed...) but that big cats can roar and make a vaguely purry noise that they call chuffling (http://www.sandiegozoo.org/animalbytes/t-smallcat.html). But cheetah's can't roar, they purr..... A quick google search turned up loads and loads of articles about this subject.

Trebuchet
2005-Dec-12, 09:25 PM
I was once told by a guide at an animal park that while domestic cats purr both on inhaling and exhaling, big cats only purr one way. Can't remember which. The exception was the American mountain lion, which purrs both ways.

I'm not sure about injured cats, but I know that all my cats have purred when frightened or stressed, such as during visits to the vet.

Gillianren
2005-Dec-12, 10:27 PM
I have a cat now! He sits on my lap and purrs, except when he decides that he needs to play with the mouse. I guess he heard that cats are supposed to do that . . . .

Candy
2005-Dec-12, 11:00 PM
I have a cat now! He sits on my lap and purrs, except when he decides that he needs to play with the mouse. I guess he heard that cats are supposed to do that . . . .
Cats are very therapeutic. Mine is wedged behind my back and the sofa right now purring away. I'm uncomfortable, but the love that emanates is priceless. Plus, she is warm. Purrrrrr!

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-13, 12:04 AM
It's my impression from all the cats I have lived with and know that a cat purr is a signal that it's harmless and you shouldn't attack it, which means it's linked to an awareness of that possibility.
It's my experience that if you sit with a cat, he purrs until he's completely relaxed then he stops purring.
In my mind this also explains nicely why a stressed, frightened or hurt cat will purr.
As for the healing powers of a cat's purr, the only one I can think of is that it's one of the best relaxants I know of.

LurchGS
2005-Dec-13, 06:46 AM
IIRC, lions can purr. I thought the cat kingdom was basically divided into cheetahs (which seem to be different than the others) and everything else. I recall several nature programs talking about the fact that the biggest difference for domesticated cats is their size.

Cheetas are indeed different from other cats - by bone structure, they're actually more closely related to dogs...