PDA

View Full Version : Generation X/Y Demarcation



jkmccrann
2005-Dec-12, 01:44 PM
In posting this poll, I realise that there really is no set date to this demarcation, and in fact that people born supposedly into one Generation may more readily associate their cultural viewpoints with a different Generation.

Despite that, inevitably one needs to settle on approximate dates to idenitfy different strate of people in this socio-cultural area. If one accepts (which I do) that the boundary between Generation Y and a subsequent Generation, perhaps Gen. Zed, is September 11, that means Generation Y effectively ends around 1996/97. But what about the other end?

I would personally argue that Generation X ends around 1977, Generation Y thus beginning in 1977/78. No firm reason for this, but an ending around that time means that things like the end of the Cold War, the downing of the Berlin Wall etc. all occured for members of Generation X who were at the very least entering teenagerhood through to their mid 20s at the time, which I think is a fair approximation.

What do the rest of you guys think and what events shape your views on this subject. For those of you out there who don't buy the whole Baby Boomer/Generation X/Generation Y socio-cultural explanation as a way to classify people of a certain age, how do you differentiate age groups?

For me, growing up in Generation Y is the experience of dealing with a helluva lot of new technology crashing into our lives. Technology that changes the processes of a lot of things in our society. Obviously the central technology that comes to mind is based around computers and more specifically PCs. Throughout my youth computing power seemed to come on at an inexorable pace and come ever more into our lives. Things like making notebook computers compulsory for students came in just as I was entering high school, around 12/13 years ago, and now they're commonplace and pretty much every student must have one.

Also mobile phones, starting high-school they were very exotic and certainly no one had them except those who really needed them in their line of work, by the time I was starting at uni, 1998/99, pretty much every one in my age group had a mobile phone, and they were just accepted as something you must have to keep in touch with your friends and organise social outings and events. It's those 2 technologies in particular, and the rise of the Internet, which I associate most strongly with growing up as a member of Generation Y.

What do you guys think?

farmerjumperdon
2005-Dec-12, 02:50 PM
I don't know the exact years demographers have designated for the 14th generation of our nation, but I have not heard it called Y before. What I've seen calls the 13th generation GenX, and the 14th the Millenium Group. (Is Y just because it follows X, or is it a pickup on Y2K?)

There's a very good book titled 13th Gen that is a pretty entertaining and informative read. It's got a great historical overview of all the generations since our culture was founded, but focuses on GenX. A nice antidote to the idea that GenX is just a bunch of lazy slackers, as things almost always look different from a historical perspective.

pumpkinpie
2005-Dec-12, 02:59 PM
I've heard it called Gen Y many times for many years. I believe it's just an unimaginative monkier following Gen X. No specific meaning.

jkmccrann
2005-Dec-12, 03:00 PM
I've seen it referred to as Y in many places, Generation Y (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generation_Y), and for that matter Generation Z (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generation_Z)

As it explains on those pages its Y for 2 reasons. 1 being because it follows X, the other being, because it/we supposedly ask Why? of many things and are out there trying to find the answers to various things, which I suppose resources like the Internet can only help.

I guess the term that is eventually settled on will be a matter for the community, I though am happy to be associated with the apparently inquisitive nature of this generation.

farmerjumperdon
2005-Dec-12, 03:07 PM
I wonder if we'll go to A after Z and work our way back to W; or if some major event will spark a new naming scheme? Maybe if we land on Mars it will be RedGen.

BTW, there was a website of an Italian company named PowerGen that was up a few years ago (don't know if it's still available). In a fun little twist of naming schemes the site was titled, . . . drumroll . . .

PowerGenItalia.

jkmccrann
2005-Dec-12, 03:24 PM
I wonder if we'll go to A after Z and work our way back to W; or if some major event will spark a new naming scheme? Maybe if we land on Mars it will be RedGen.

BTW, there was a website of an Italian company named PowerGen that was up a few years ago (don't know if it's still available). In a fun little twist of naming schemes the site was titled, . . . drumroll . . .

PowerGenItalia.

Really! Well, they do have a good sense of humour there in Italy.

Just checked, the website is still there, but it asked me for a password before I could view it. :(

farmerjumperdon
2005-Dec-12, 03:44 PM
Really! Well, they do have a good sense of humour there in Italy.

Just checked, the website is still there, but it asked me for a password before I could view it. :(

I tried it again too. I got blocked; I think by the webpolice here at work. We are blocked from a lot of stuff, and my guess is the site name itself is enough to send off alarms. I've often wondered how long it will take them to block BAUT.

I did notice that the only capital letter in the name is actually the P. I think the person who told me about it added the capitals G & I for their own emphasis.

GDwarf
2005-Dec-12, 11:56 PM
I beleive that that company changed their name when people pointed out what it meant in English.

Candy
2005-Dec-13, 12:04 AM
I was under the impression that a "generation" was 20 years. I barely made Generation X with my birthdate (1966), so that would mean Generation Y would end with 1990's births. Right? :shifty:

Disinfo Agent
2005-Dec-13, 12:17 AM
What is generation X, anyway? Malcolm X's generation?...

Candy
2005-Dec-13, 12:31 AM
X, as far as I know, symbolized X as in "not knowing". Y meant "why?". I'm not in Marketing any longer, so I haven't kept up on the demographs or meanings.

jkmccrann
2005-Dec-13, 04:48 AM
Generation X. was also labelled by some, and I utterly reject this characterisation, as the `Slacker Generation'. As for how long a generation lasts, all things being equal I agree it would be about 20 years, but certain events generally come to define generations and they don't always happen at such convenient intervals.

If you go to the Wikipedia articles I linked to, you can go back through the years through all the generations back to the mid 18th century, and some of the generations are accepted as having lasted for up to 30 years.

LurchGS
2005-Dec-13, 05:00 AM
I would suggest that ANY generation is regarded as a bunch of slackers by the generation imediately after (at least, in the post industrial revolution era)

I know *I* have always considered a generation to be 18 years...

EvilBob
2005-Dec-13, 05:22 AM
I've often wondered how long it will take them to block BAUT.
My netpolice block it from some of the discussions. I link to the ip rather than the url.
I always thought the Gen X tag came from it being the 10th generation since US Independance - X being roman ten.