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Glom
2005-Dec-18, 07:49 PM
There is a destination that Stargate SG-1 is powerless to prevent itself from reaching. After eight years of fussing over Vikings and Romans and Ancient Egyptians, the Christian bombshell is about to be dropped upon us.

The Ori are symbolised by fire. From their perspective it makes sense because fire is illumination and hence enlightenment. However, as Daniel observes in 'Origin', fire has become a symbol of demonic imagery in our culture and he postulates the Ancients, in some way or another, have influenced this. It is clearly established by Orlin in 'The Fourth Horseman part 1' (Christian reference if there ever was one) that the Ori are the enemy of the Ancients. From that perspective, it makes sense that they would establish fire to be a symbol of evil.

Now let's consider the Ori's MO. They offer enlightenment in exchange for servitude. The offer is hollow and made to serve the Ori's own interests. But they, through their priors, tempt people down the path of evil, the path contrary to the belief of the Ancients. This behaviour is remarkably similar to that of none other than the Devil himself. The Ori are the devil both in appearance and behaviour.

Then there's Jesus. He was killed, rose to heaven, and then returned briefly for a farewell. We know from 'Maternal Instinct' that enlightened people ascend when they die. They can also appear human even when they are ascended as we saw Orlin and Daniel do. The pattern fits perfectly.

It is only a matter of time before Jesus gets brought into this.

nomuse
2005-Dec-19, 03:12 AM
That might actually be refreshing. I'm just thinking of all the other stories that shied away at the last moment from taking on the actual Christian figures -- like Marvel Comics and their "No, he's not really the Son of Satan; he's the son of some OTHER demon co-incidentally named Satan."

At least in the early seasons the SG-1 attitude was "okay, there's beings with power, and sometimes they helped us and we're grateful and all that. But if they want worship -- well, they can just eat my shorts." I remember Jack in an early episode, in the middle of a bought of accelerated aging, tearing down a temple and delivering an impassioned speech against blind worship of anyone or any thing.

But even today, could a show get away with having a character stand up and say "Hey, that Christ fellow was a good person. And he had some cool technology. But saying his dad created the universe -- well, that's just a bunch of hooey."


Now if you'll excuse me I have an Agostica celebration to plan. ;)

Avatar28
2005-Dec-23, 10:56 AM
I really don't think they'll go in that direction, at least not in so many words. What imagery or hidden messages one gets out of that, well, that's their own business, but officially the story is about nothing more than what's told on screen.

novaderrik
2005-Dec-23, 05:57 PM
Xena had to deal with Christian angels, so why not the SG1 crew?

Roy Batty
2005-Dec-24, 02:03 PM
Wasn't Baal meant to be representative of Satan? a Semitic god at any rate.

Gillianren
2005-Dec-24, 08:52 PM
Baal was a Canaanite God whose name is the subject of several puns in the Bible. If I remember properly, his name was Baalzebub, which means "lord of something-or-other"--I don't remember what--but the Hebrew name for him was Beelzebub, which means "lord of dung" or "lord of the flies," depending on who you ask.

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-25, 05:08 PM
It's common to have the gods of a vanquished religion become the demons of the next.
I'm looking forward to the next one, with its tales of the demon who told his followers they should be happy while dashing babies against rocks.1







1(Psalm 137:8-9)

parallaxicality
2005-Dec-26, 11:53 AM
Baal was a Canaanite God whose name is the subject of several puns in the Bible. If I remember properly, his name was Baalzebub, which means "lord of something-or-other"--I don't remember what--but the Hebrew name for him was Beelzebub, which means "lord of dung" or "lord of the flies," depending on who you ask.

Ba'al means "lord"; according to one theory, his name was originally "Ba'al Zebul," which means "lord of the high", but this was degraded by the Israelites into "Ba'al Zebub," meaning "lord of the flies". It's just a hypothesis though.

"Baldrick, eternity in the clutches of Beelzebub, and all his hellish minions, will be a picnic compared to five minutes with me... and this pencil."