PDA

View Full Version : Strange stories of 2005



Titana
2005-Dec-19, 10:43 PM
These are some of the most strange stories reported on Yahoo news this year.


http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20051218/od_afp/yearoffbeatstrange;_ylt=Alo5Zw6aKC3Ke.jZT.OGLoUDW7 oF;_ylu=X3oDMTBiMW04NW9mBHNlYwMlJVRPUCUl


Two stories that were kind a funny to me is this one:



- In Japan, police were so upset to hear that a student who was caught up in a traffic accident had to get to an important exam that they gave him a full escort with sirens, arriving with 10 minutes to spare.


And this one:


An Iraqi man who enjoyed a night of love with a British woman in Cyprus got into hot water because of his bad English. He had apparently decided to say "Yes" to whatever she requested -- which worked fine until she thought to ask him, after the fact, whether he had AIDS. "Yes," he answered -- erroneously as it later turned out.




Titana.;)

Swift
2005-Dec-19, 10:52 PM
An Iraqi man who enjoyed a night of love with a British woman in Cyprus got into hot water because of his bad English. He had apparently decided to say "Yes" to whatever she requested -- which worked fine until she thought to ask him, after the fact, whether he had AIDS. "Yes," he answered -- erroneously as it later turned out.

Maybe that belongs in the lost in translation thread. I noted before that non-English speakers will often use "yes" to mean "yes, I heard you" rather than "yes, that is correct" or "yes, I understand you". I wonder if that is true the other way?

Candy
2005-Dec-19, 11:04 PM
Funny, most of those stories made it on BABB/BAUT. :lol:

LurchGS
2005-Dec-19, 11:45 PM
Maybe that belongs in the lost in translation thread. I noted before that non-English speakers will often use "yes" to mean "yes, I heard you" rather than "yes, that is correct" or "yes, I understand you". I wonder if that is true the other way?


I think that's a common practice across any fuzzy language line. It's far easier to say 'yes' and end the line of questioning than it is to say "WTF are you talking about?"

Actually, now that I think on it a moment, it happens within the same language, too. I can't begin to tell the number of customers I've walked step by step through a process, asked them if they understand the steps (I know they don't have a clue what's happening behind the scenes), only to have them call every day for the next three weeks asking the same questions.

It's why I hired account managers - I don't deal well with customers

Titana
2005-Dec-20, 12:06 AM
I think that's a common practice across any fuzzy language line. It's far easier to say 'yes' and end the line of questioning than it is to say "WTF are you talking about?"

:lol:



I quess it is far easier to say yes and end the line there. Long ago i use to work for a Chinese man that hardly speaked english and i remember every time i would ask him something he would always say yes. I quess it is so a person dont think that they dont understand. Thinking about it, i should of asked him for a raise. I am sure he would not have said no.......:D



Titana.