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Fraser
2005-Dec-21, 08:16 PM
SUMMARY: NASA's Grace Earth observation satellite has created the first, comprehensive survey of the entire Greenland ice sheet. The spacecraft found that the volume of ice is decreasing by 162 cubic kilometres per year (39 cubic miles), which is higher than all previously published estimates. This ice melt is contributing 0.4 millimeters (.016 inches) per year to global sea level rise. Grace was also able to measure detailed changes in the surface of the sea floor after the Sumatran earthquake and resulting tsunami that happened almost a year ago.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/grace_greenland.html)
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GBendt
2005-Dec-23, 08:53 PM
Hi,

Now we have facts provided by the NASA Grace Earth observation satellite. Next to be done is to examine them and decide on the appropriate measures to keep the ice shield on Greenland, and to keep it from melting.

Otherwise many people will have to leave their homes, and we will have to abandon many renowned places, like New York, Miami, Boston, New Orleans, Los Angeles, Mumbay, Calcutta, Abu Dhabi, Basra, Alexandria, Venice, Marseille, Le Havre, London, Kopenhagen, Hamburg, St. Petersburg, Shanghai and Tokyo, just to mention a few.

Regards,

Günther

ngold
2005-Dec-30, 04:30 AM
SUMMARY: NASA's Grace Earth observation satellite has created the first, comprehensive survey of the entire Greenland ice sheet. The spacecraft found that the volume of ice is decreasing by 162 cubic kilometres per year (39 cubic miles), which is higher than all previously published estimates. This ice melt is contributing 0.4 millimeters (.016 inches) per year to global sea level rise. Grace was also able to measure detailed changes in the surface of the sea floor after the Sumatran earthquake and resulting tsunami that happened almost a year ago.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/grace_greenland.html)
What do you think about this story? post your comments below.

Maybe I don't get it yet. This planet has had ice ages and the like before humans walked the earth. Then the planet adjusted, etc etc etc.

What does .4mm plus the other ice caps around the world melting really mean over the next 50 years?

One inch doesn't drown NYC or the other cities mentioned.

N.

jkmccrann
2005-Dec-30, 06:03 AM
Hi,

Now we have facts provided by the NASA Grace Earth observation satellite. Next to be done is to examine them and decide on the appropriate measures to keep the ice shield on Greenland, and to keep it from melting.

Otherwise many people will have to leave their homes, and we will have to abandon many renowned places, like New York, Miami, Boston, New Orleans, Los Angeles, Mumbay, Calcutta, Abu Dhabi, Basra, Alexandria, Venice, Marseille, Le Havre, London, Kopenhagen, Hamburg, St. Petersburg, Shanghai and Tokyo, just to mention a few.

Regards,

GŁnther

I'm afraid its already too late for some places, why anyone would knowingly move back to New Orleans at the moment is beyond me, particularly when they're only talking about restoring the levees to a level that would not have survived Katrina. If I were a former resident of New Orleans, I would probably need a large financial inducement to return there with that inherent danger still hanging over my head.

Gullible Jones
2006-Jan-01, 10:58 PM
Maybe I don't get it yet. This planet has had ice ages and the like before humans walked the earth. Then the planet adjusted, etc etc etc.

What does .4mm plus the other ice caps around the world melting really mean over the next 50 years?

One inch doesn't drown NYC or the other cities mentioned.

N.


Basically, the problem is that the planet doesn't give a damn about us.

Jakenorrish
2006-Jan-02, 03:57 PM
Basically, the problem is that the planet doesn't give a damn about us.


This is true, though not necessarily a problem. After all, life has to adapt to suit its conditions, and always has. The conditions can be altered to suit the life (for example when we and other species build shelter). I'm just worried that we may well be altering the conditions to the extent that our lives will become a lot more difficult in the not too distant future.

There are quite a few that don't think that current climate change trends are down to mankind and their opinions on this are equally as important as mine however...

Ilya
2006-Jan-03, 03:25 AM
If all ice of Greenland and Antarctica melt, then total amount of inhabitable land on Earth will INCREASE -- because Greenland and Antarctica themselves will become available for colonization.

desertmonk
2006-Jan-03, 01:34 PM
If all ice of Greenland and Antarctica melt, then total amount of inhabitable land on Earth will INCREASE -- because Greenland and Antarctica themselves will become available for colonization.


Then we can look for oil and coal, burn them, and increase the greenhouse gases present in our atmosphere.

Jakenorrish
2006-Jan-03, 04:51 PM
If all ice of Greenland and Antarctica melt, then total amount of inhabitable land on Earth will INCREASE -- because Greenland and Antarctica themselves will become available for colonization.

Nope, the models currently available suggest that the deserts will grow, famine worldwide will be greater due to more extreme weather, so you'd lose more than you'd gain.

ngold
2006-Jan-03, 05:39 PM
Even I agree with that. The economic cost of migration to Greenland and Antarica would be a staggering number. And economic cost invariably translates to quality of life.

Taks
2006-Jan-04, 07:11 AM
Nope, the models currently available suggest that the deserts will grow, famine worldwide will be greater due to more extreme weather, so you'd lose more than you'd gain.i suppose that depends upon the GCM you use. they all seem to predict different things. very few agree on outcomes, and most are extremely sensitive to even minor changes in predicted growth patterns (which dictates greenhouse gas outputs)... this latter bit is a definite knock on robustness, which is sort of necessary when making predictions.

btw, are any of these studies taking into account the fact that the antarctic is actually gaining ice? doesn't that offset greenland's changes (a land mass which coincidentally, used to be much greener, ahem)?

taks

trinitree88
2006-Jan-04, 02:42 PM
Ok. So, How much for an ocean-front lot in Greenland?:lol: