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wayneee
2005-Dec-21, 10:27 PM
I have noted through out my years, that nerds and Geeks, at least back in the late and early Seventies , found each other playing Dungeon and Dragons, and other various games. Who here is guilty , and give me a story of your favorite game. Im looking for memorable expieriences, not the whole campaign.

wayneee
2005-Dec-21, 10:41 PM
I started to play D&D back in 1978,We were young and borrowed heavily from Tolkien in our own games. In 1980 I DMed a large game that lsted for 3 years and involved 15 players and approx. 80 NPC's . It was The Lord of the Rings, with players taking the place of Ring Party, Gondor Party , Forces of Sauron , Forces of Sarumon. Well my evil players were better than my good , the ring was rescued from the meddlesome Good folk and order was restored. So you see Happy ending !

Swift
2005-Dec-21, 11:12 PM
I played with one group when I was in grad school around 83/84 and with a different group around 86/87. The DM for the second group was pretty nice, didn't want to wait a long time for level 1 characters to really become something, and so we started with some pretty impressive characters. I had a great female elf fighter. I also was good about staying in character; one of the guys in our group was kind of a jerk (in real life) and his thief character was being a jerk (in a rude, sexual way) to my elf - I caught the jerk (but not the DM) by complete surprise when I rolled a surprise attack and taught him a lesson.

The first DM was my friend Nick and he had a weird sense of humor. One time our party found itself in a weird hallway - he's describing it in typical DM style (its brightly lit, no there is no obvious light source, it curves gently to the right, the walls are kind of shiny, but not like any metal or stone,....). We finally figured out we were on the Enterprise. :p

aurora
2005-Dec-21, 11:18 PM
I bought the white box D&D set back around 1976, and introduced a number of college friends to it. We played off and on for a couple of years, until computers were within our reach and then we migrated to playing on computers instead of with paper and pencil.

Taks
2005-Dec-21, 11:23 PM
i'm heavily into fantasy computer role-playing games, particularly D&D. i've been playing D&D in various forms since the early 80s.

taks

LurchGS
2005-Dec-21, 11:27 PM
hay! I stil have my white box set (bought also in 76) -0 I have another set from a few years later, a few books, and about 6 billion dice.

most of our quests lasted only a month or two, but involved non-stop play from friday evening to Monday morning (monday morning classes were full of punch-drunk students). Also involved dense blue clouds of smoke and dozens of pizzas shared among 10 or so players.

Musashi
2005-Dec-21, 11:28 PM
I was playing an Urban Arcana game and we were still pretty lowlevel, around level 3 iirc. We stumbled upon an underground arena where some goblinkin were pitting some of their hapless kind up against an Owlbear. We had a machine gun up in one vanatage point and opened up on the goblins from there. Meanwhile, my character slipped down a rope and ended up on the arena floor shooting away as more and more goblins and then hobgoblins poured through the entrance. Finally they had had enough and fled, leaving me standing next to a wounded and upset Owlbear. It turned toward my character, lifted him over his head and started roaring. I thought it was all over, there was no way I could withstand an attack from this creature, but as the roaring continued, I realized that it was cheering and added my own weak yells to the celebration.

Same game, but a few adventures earlier there was a disturbance at the local theater. We armed up and headed over, but the cops were already cordoning the area off. We had no right to be there (and probably no right to be armed as well as we were in public). My character strolled up to the cop in charge and said something like, "We're a special unit with the HRT, we'll take over here." It was a desperation move. The DM looked at me with a "that's your plan?" look and asked for a bluff roll. I picked up the die and started thinking about new character concepts. Then I rolled a 20. We got inside, almost pulled it off but then total disaster struck. My character was nearly killed and another character was kidnapped. Also, a couple of the guys got some terribly weird disease.

In that campaign, my character ended nearly every episode in the hospital. Fun game though.

Moose
2005-Dec-21, 11:50 PM
I've played off-and-on throughout much of my life. Being in a small town, our group was similarly fairly small, rarely more than four or five people at a time, including the DM. Three of us switched off DMing duties as the mood took us.

My group had an unspoken policy that we were there for the story and the fun, so killing or maiming characters was verbotten. Unfortunately, we also had a munchkin. (A Paladin, of course.) As a result, and to this day, I tend to pick on them somewhat. You'd be surprised what they can live through. *nasty grin* In my defense, I do give fair warning about my DMing quirk and suggest a non-paladin role-playable character up-front.

I am absolutely brutal to NPCs, though, and tend to go through 'em like popcorn.

My favorite DM pranks were during a transition adventure, IIRC, called "Through the Mirror" or something like that. It was a straightforward exercise in Alice-style RPG cliché, but I used DM priviledge to spice it up. Nothing ended up being what it was assumed to be (and what the module prescribed, for that matter.)

So we end up on the obligatory chessboard. The sides were White and Black, and of course our munchkin assumes this had anything to do with alignment. The knights were malicious critters not terribly unlike centaurs, but with a touch that sapped wisdom. So this white knight bars their way. The paladin, not wanting to kill what he assumed to be a good critter (he never bothered to check), suggested arm wrestling. Hilarity ensued, and I managed to score a pair of wisdom points.

They of course (wrongly) deduced that since the "white" tabarded critters were evil and hostile, that the black tabarded critters might just be good. They try to negociate with the next black "soldier" they run into. Hilarity ensued again.

In the ensuing fight, the mage gets the bright idea to cast improved invisibility on an NPC, a rogue. She takes umbrage at his having cast a spell on her without her consent, and starts beating up the mage mid-melée until he dispelled the spell.

Then there was the exploding Humpty-Dumpty, the 20-foot bees and ants, and the "wall of aluminium siding" custom spell to help fend off (herd, actually) a multitude of creepy-crawlies that were only dangerous in multitudes.

*chuckle* I put them through the wringer more than once on that adventure. Good times.

Dragon Star
2005-Dec-21, 11:55 PM
As some of you know I play Magic, which is the first trading card game (I expect everyone who plays D&D knows what it is) I love to go on Fridays with friends out to the card shop.

Glad to know I am not alone with game playing....:shifty:

Moose
2005-Dec-22, 12:03 AM
Ah yes, Magic, The Gathering Of My Money. I remember that addiction well. I still have my modest box of ULs. Unfortunately, my friends mostly teethed during the Betas. Only so much an UL deck can do against moxen, icy manipulators, and the dreaded black lotus. *rolls eyes*

I once created a "shutdown" blue enchantment deck (with some white support, mostly for the CoPs) designed to mana starve my opponent by drowning him in upkeep, and poking him to death with a small legion of Tims, Pirate ships, and Tim-sticks.

I won, eventually. The game took almost three hours to conclude. *grin* He made me promise to never EVER use that deck again. *lol*

Dragon Star
2005-Dec-22, 12:09 AM
Ah yes, Magic, The Gathering Of My Money. I remember that addiction well. I still have my modest box of ULs. Unfortunately, my friends mostly teethed during the Betas. Only so much an UL deck can do against moxen, icy manipulators, and the dreaded black lotus. *rolls eyes*

I once created a "shutdown" blue enchantment deck (with some white support, mostly for the CoPs) designed to mana starve my opponent by drowning him in upkeep, and poking him to death with a small legion of Tims, Pirate ships, and Tim-sticks.

I won, eventually. The game took almost three hours to conclude. *grin* He made me promise to never EVER use that deck again. *lol*

lol, yea...it is starting to get quite popular again.

...My best deck is a mono black deck where I sacrifice my creatures, and in turn make you sacrifice your own, it is really good. So I take it you don't play anymore?

Moose
2005-Dec-22, 12:22 AM
...My best deck is a mono black deck where I sacrifice my creatures, and in turn make you sacrifice your own, it is really good. So I take it you don't play anymore?

No, not really. I gave it up about the time UL got superceded by 3e. It's been long enough since I've played that I've pretty much forgotten how. I still like the card art, though. Disintegrate remains my favorite card to this day. No subtlety whatsoever.

wayneee
2005-Dec-22, 12:24 AM
As some of you know I play Magic, which is the first trading card game (I expect everyone who plays D&D knows what it is) I love to go on Fridays with friends out to the card shop.

Glad to know I am not alone with game playing....:shifty:
I personely know the guy who did alot of the Art Work for the First Series of Magic Cards . He was an original member of our Role players Rick Edmond. He used to do full renditions of our Characters. His Art was very Marvel like .:dance:

Dragon Star
2005-Dec-22, 12:54 AM
The art for magic is great, Here are some examples for those of you who don't know about magic..As a note, I like the darker art, the game is not demented as some of you may thing from the art, but each card tells a story, and some of the stories are not so happy.

Hells Caretaker (http://www.wizards.com/magic/images/mtgcom/wallpapers/Wallpaper_HellsCaretaker_1280x960.jpg)

Grozoth (http://www.wizards.com/magic/images/mtgcom/wallpapers/Wallpaper_Grozoth_1280x1024.jpg)

Hand of Cruelty (http://www.wizards.com/magic/images/mtgcom/wallpapers/Wallpaper_HandOfCruelty_1280x960.jpg)

Serra Angel (http://www.wizards.com/magic/images/mtgcom/wallpapers/Wallpaper_SerraAngel_1280x960.jpg)

Ilya
2005-Dec-22, 03:06 AM
Not my favorite campaign/adventure, but probably favorite game moment. It was at an RPG convention, so we were playing one-use characters in a standalone adventure. We start out stripped of all equipment and imprisoned in an orc dungeon, with orcs getting ready to prepare dinner (us). Each of us is in a separate cell with iron bars. On of the characters is a half-ogre fighter with stats you would expect from a half-ogre. My character (human monk) shouts the half-ogre's name to get his attention, then yells "If you don't break this door, you will NEVER EAT AGAIN!".

Everyone cracked up, the DM rolled a few dice, then turned to the guy playing the half-ogre: "You just ripped the cell door off its hinges".

The rest of that adventure was almost as good.

SolusLupus
2005-Dec-22, 03:27 AM
I read and memorized the Advanced D&D manuals... I never actually played them, I just grew up with wonder at the idea of fantasy. I made many dungeons and stories mentally, but never really played them out.

It was D&D 3rd edition where I really went for some fun. Someone in our SCA group joined up the D&D group, and we went at it; he made an entire world that was a cross between the world of Conan and D&D concepts... it was great.

Other than that, haven't actually played much recently; played a few online games, but they don't last long.

wayneee
2005-Dec-22, 04:41 AM
Not my favorite campaign/adventure, but probably favorite game moment. It was at an RPG convention, so we were playing one-use characters in a standalone adventure. We start out stripped of all equipment and imprisoned in an orc dungeon, with orcs getting ready to prepare dinner (us). Each of us is in a separate cell with iron bars. On of the characters is a half-ogre fighter with stats you would expect from a half-ogre. My character (human monk) shouts the half-ogre's name to get his attention, then yells "If you don't break this door, you will NEVER EAT AGAIN!".

Everyone cracked up, the DM rolled a few dice, then turned to the guy playing the half-ogre: "You just ripped the cell door off its hinges".

The rest of that adventure was almost as good.

That was my problem as a DM, I never routed for the Player Charcters. I never initiated good out comes, or gave unsought clues to get the campaign moving. I once needed to trash an entire 9 pages of Dungeon and 20 NPCs because the party found two Rubies and decided they could sell them for more Gold than they were going to get to kill a Vampire. So they decide to leave the way they came, and well it turns out the Castle is no longer on the Material Plane. The only way back was to kill the Vampire. So they spent a lot of time at the door that they came in opening and closing it, getting angry that repititions of closing and opening isnt working. All along making qquite a bit of racket.

Thats the other thing I do , if a monster is Genius , I play them as Genius. The Vampire allowed them to play with the door for a bit , watching as a little cat from the outside. Finally one of the knuckle heads decides its an illusion and decides to just run out into this Misty world. He runs and runs , my vampire follows curiously, and well kills the 5th level ranger easily. All along the others have ventured out a bit yelling for him( i had brought the knucklehead into the other room to kill him) I brought him in and made him call back to them as if he had found something (now that he was dead , he wanted company, so he role played well) TThey follow his voice to a well, Hes leaning over it, as if he is trying to reach deep down into it. WEll the thief is the first to reach him, There is always that one guy who wants to touch the treasure first. He leans over the well next to his dead party mate. Suddenly the thief seems to lean to much and fall into the welland the dead Ranger seems to try grab him but falls with him. Now there are three, a Cleric , a Magic User and a Dwarf Fighter.

Everyone runs to the well, and no one is prepared for 4 Gargoles, well the Magic user dies in Round Two the Dwarf gets badly damgaed but Rolled in front of me two 20's and only missed twice, the Cleric by some miracle killed one by him self and was untouched untill there was only one left. By the time the battle was over the Magic user's body was missing.

Now there was Two, They used up all of the clerics spells healing. They no longer could see the castle , a compass that they had didnt seem to work, they decided in all their wisdom to actualy go down into the well , maybe to save thier friends, and there wasnt realy anywhere else they could see to go.

For a touching Moment in time I had sympathy for them......but it passed and i ROLLED TO SEE IF THEY TIED A SECURE KNOT on thier rope, They were dropping torches down the well they could see thier friends down there. Hey they were moving to (animate Dead Spell by our friendly nieghborhood Vampire) The Cleric climbs down as the Dwarf waits up top . I wait until the Cleric reaches the bottom then Vampy casualy strolls up to the Dwarf. NOise , bang Clutter... crunch Eiiiiiieeeeeeeeeeeee!!!
Now there is only one
The Cleric listens and sees glimpses of this for a moment , until he needs to face his Dead party mates , now zombies. Amazingly he lived through it, and succeded in burning the Zombies. My vampire simply pulled up the rope and looked down at the Cleric. " I will give you a choice my friend, come up here and be imortal and let me feed. or stay there with your friends."

Cleric being Cleric , shouts some Religous thing , and prays for devine intervention. I Gave it Roll of Course, Percentiles. Would you believe Double 00. The Dead Ranger behind my back saw the Roll and hooted. I tell them it takes two 00's for devine intervention. I roll , and infront of all I rolled just that.:evil:

SolusLupus
2005-Dec-22, 08:22 AM
As a DM, I'm rather lenient for the characters. I honestly see the game as a story, not as a set of arbitrary objectives; and I also see it as a story that the group is telling together, not the DM trying to purposefully kill off the characters, and get peeved when the outcome doesn't do that. Of course, I also say that stupidity shouldn't be rewarded; if the characters do something dumb, they should pay the consequences.

If you slap a viking chick on the rump, be prepared to have a few fingers broken.

Yoshua
2005-Dec-22, 10:47 AM
I suppose it is kind of sad, I've owned D&D manuals from the original basic boxed set and first edition advanced rules up till some second edition stuff. But I've never been in a campaign that even got past character creation.

My group tended to play a super hero roleplaying game called Champions from Hero Games. A very fun game. Our campaign lasted some 5ish years or so (and was still going on when I moved, so not sure when it died off).

Champions, unlike D&D, was an open ended point based system. You paid for statistics and powers by taking on disadvantages to your character (like secret or public identity, dependant NPC's (think Jimmy Olsen), and the like) or you could make powers themselves cheaper by taking limitations on them. Main rule to this was that a disadvantage or limitation that never came up was worth nothing. I definitly preferred this system as I could make the character I wanted to play. D&D required a cooperative GM to do that, even then you probably would make comprimises (and by stock rules, it's just dumb luck if you get a character you want to play).

I think the funniest and shortest campaign I was in was our miserable attempt at a rolemaster campaign. It only lasted one session, in which I managed to kill the campaign. I'd chosen some oddball casting class, it sounded neat but didn't start off all that impressive (then again, no rolemaster class does). Well not far into our first adventure we run into some massive demonic creature. I was pretty well convinced that we were dead, but I was gonna go down kicking, punching, and biting. I cast my puny little light bolt spell at it (believe that was the name of it, it was literally the weakest offensive spell in rolemaster). Now in rolemaster, natural rolls of 20 are critical hits, after which you roll again for the crit chart, subsequent 20's move you on you higher crit charts which tend to have very nasty results. Well three 20's later... the demon was quite dead. Except, oops, we weren't actually supposed to kill or even fight said demon. GM is rather ticked off with me, and that was the last session we did. (course it was his own fault, he was the DM, if the demon wasn't supposed to die, he can just say "nothing happens" or some such)

mickal555
2005-Dec-22, 11:27 AM
D&D scares me...

Moose
2005-Dec-22, 11:28 AM
Well three 20's later... the demon was quite dead. Except, oops, we weren't actually supposed to kill or even fight said demon. GM is rather ticked off with me, and that was the last session we did. (course it was his own fault, he was the DM, if the demon wasn't supposed to die, he can just say "nothing happens" or some such)

Absolutely. Sheesh. In my campaigns, rolls that can mess up the storyline are basically just for show, if they are visible to the players at all.

Heck, even my "wall of aluminium siding" custom spell was a way to get my players moving again. One of the mages fancied himself a wall spell enthusiast, and was trying to entice a local NPC mage resident to the surreal mirror pocket plane to do some spell trading. "I know a lot of wall spells". "That's nice, so do I." I didn't want them to feel too domestic in what was essentially the only safe spot in the adventure.

Moose
2005-Dec-22, 11:37 AM
I definitly preferred this system as I could make the character I wanted to play. D&D required a cooperative GM to do that, even then you probably would make comprimises (and by stock rules, it's just dumb luck if you get a character you want to play).

Oh yeah. My policy was that if a character concept sounded promising on the role playing side, wasn't inherently unbalanced, but wasn't possible under the core rules, I'd find a way to make it possible up to and including hand-assigning the stats. They'd always pay for it (through the nose) in game, but that's really what they were looking for to begin with. I've been there far too many times to be unsympathetic.

Generally, if we were building fresh, I'd start characters around level 3 or 4 so I didn't have to fudge rolls too much (or too obviously), so that usually gave me enough leeway according to 3rd ed rules that if a player wanted to do something exotic, I could accomodate it without too much trouble. My players didn't abuse it (much). :D

Yoshua
2005-Dec-22, 12:01 PM
Oh yeah. My policy was that if a character concept sounded promising on the roll playing side, wasn't inherently unbalanced, but wasn't possible under the core rules, I'd find a way to make it possible up to and including hand-assigning the stats. They'd always pay for it (through the nose) in game, but that's really what they were looking for to begin with. I've been there far too many times to be unsympathetic.

Generally, if we were building fresh, I'd start characters around level 3 or 4 so I didn't have to fudge rolls too much (or too obviously), so that usually gave me enough leeway according to 3rd ed rules that if a player wanted to do something exotic, I could accomodate it without too much trouble. My players didn't abuse it (much). :D

That's what I liked about Hero system. It was designed from the ground up to accomodate player concepts without letting them run amok (after all you had to pay for everything with disadvantages and usually you'd have a total point cap). The system wasn't totally perfect, certain interpertations of the rules could allow some outlandish loopholes that resulted in very low point characters that could topple the likes of Galactus single handed. But such things were pretty easily nixed by any half awake GM that cared about their campaign.

D&D, least up till 2nd edition just seemed to require too much fudging of the rules to be enjoyable to me. Though a friend of mine did some up with some modified rules for Hero to make it somewhat more D&D like for his fantasy campaign. It came out pretty well and that was a fun campaign (least while I was around for it).

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-22, 01:46 PM
I started out playing AD&D in the late '80s with a group of people (including PeterFab (http://bautforum.com/member.php?u=3902)) that I still play with (with a few additions and some who have dropped away) every other weekend.
We've tried various systems from AD&D over RoleMaster to GURPS, with a bit of In Nomine thrown in for fun, but mostly we stay with GURPS because it's so easy to make interesting characters in that system.
Sometimes when we don't feel like roleplaying, we go for Frag (http://www.sjgames.com/frag/) or Munchkin (http://www.sjgames.com/munchkin/game/) instead.

Doodler
2005-Dec-22, 02:56 PM
Ah, AD&D, how I miss the 2nd Edition.

A few of my characters have had rather fascinating ends. Like the 18 year old Fighter who just had to find out what was in that potion bottle, and ended up a seven year old...

Then there was the overly amorous female troll...

Rough crowd I played with. LOL.

five_distinct
2005-Dec-22, 03:43 PM
I played MTG for a few years when I was younger and bored in the summertime with some of my friends...

We got into it as Unlimited was going out and Revised was coming in and stayed in probably through 4th Edition and Ice Age really, and I've bought a few packs on and off since then... but I can't say I've played a game in a couple years at least.

five_distinct
2005-Dec-22, 03:44 PM
The art for magic is great, Here are some examples for those of you who don't know about magic..As a note, I like the darker art, the game is not demented as some of you may thing from the art, but each card tells a story, and some of the stories are not so happy.

Hells Caretaker (http://www.wizards.com/magic/images/mtgcom/wallpapers/Wallpaper_HellsCaretaker_1280x960.jpg)

Grozoth (http://www.wizards.com/magic/images/mtgcom/wallpapers/Wallpaper_Grozoth_1280x1024.jpg)

Hand of Cruelty (http://www.wizards.com/magic/images/mtgcom/wallpapers/Wallpaper_HandOfCruelty_1280x960.jpg)

Serra Angel (http://www.wizards.com/magic/images/mtgcom/wallpapers/Wallpaper_SerraAngel_1280x960.jpg)

Eh, I like the original art better. I like the art of the original Shivan Dragon.

Dragon Star
2005-Dec-22, 05:47 PM
Eh, I like the original art better. I like the art of the original Shivan Dragon.


The reason I don't like the original art as much is that it lacks detail, not that it is bad, but I like looking through my cards and finding something new in the detail that I never noticed before. A lot of the old art didn't show the creatures in any kind of surrounding, no background or animation of movement.

A lot has happened since Unlimited/Revised, you should look back into it, it has changed a lot! (Oh, and for you people who kept cards from these old sets, they aren't worth any money, You should give them to someone who still plays, like...ME!):D

wayneee
2005-Dec-22, 09:22 PM
There has got to another Killer DM in here. I used to hate the STory line DM's. Everything was to complete the story, as if anything you did , the result would be the same. We had a few of them in our group, they would would usualy fudge rolls, make extenuating circumstances, overload charachters with magic. (find things like +15 vorpal swords) Never killed a Player Character, just gave them bad karma or something. Those games never kept my intrest for very long. We had a few Girls in our Role Players Club. The Girls were notoriusly 'Monty Halls' Once giving out 5 Hammer of Thunder Bolts in one Treasure chest and an Artifact for everyone. They drove me nuts, but most of the sexualy repressed teenagers in the club defended them like a Paladin in a Temple.
It sounds crazy I know, but my fantasy play has to feel as if it is real. The most sacred quality is freedom of choice . The most frustrating thing as a DM I suffered through is when faced with the problem the player Character looks right at you and asks 'Well what should I do now?" or even "How can beat that thing?" I used to look at them and ask" who are you asking?"
They would say "you, the DM."
I would say "Who am I.? Im just some minor God of chance, with a twisted manevolence. Are you sure you want my advise?"
They would usualy say something like " Tell me what to do!"
I would ask what direction are the facing
then if they are facing a wall ., I tell them that they notice a cockroach wiggling its antenae at them climbing up the wall as if to get higher or closer to thier ear. I switch it up once in awhile. They ususaly fall for it and put thier heads closer to the roach. I tell them they hear a voice very faint, I make them roll to hear better. eventualy they hear thier answer it says "spueeeee click clik spek speeeeee clik tk tk tk !"
They ask what it means , to where I go in to my speech of' Who am I ?'

GDwarf
2005-Dec-22, 10:42 PM
There has got to another Killer DM in here. I used to hate the STory line DM's. Everything was to complete the story, as if anything you did , the result would be the same. We had a few of them in our group, they would would usualy fudge rolls, make extenuating circumstances, overload charachters with magic. (find things like +15 vorpal swords) Never killed a Player Character, just gave them bad karma or something. Those games never kept my intrest for very long. We had a few Girls in our Role Players Club. The Girls were notoriusly 'Monty Halls' Once giving out 5 Hammer of Thunder Bolts in one Treasure chest and an Artifact for everyone. They drove me nuts, but most of the sexualy repressed teenagers in the club defended them like a Paladin in a Temple.
It sounds crazy I know, but my fantasy play has to feel as if it is real. The most sacred quality is freedom of choice . The most frustrating thing as a DM I suffered through is when faced with the problem the player Character looks right at you and asks 'Well what should I do now?" or even "How can beat that thing?" I used to look at them and ask" who are you asking?"
They would say "you, the DM."
I would say "Who am I.? Im just some minor God of chance, with a twisted manevolence. Are you sure you want my advise?"
They would usualy say something like " Tell me what to do!"
I would ask what direction are the facing
then if they are facing a wall ., I tell them that they notice a cockroach wiggling its antenae at them climbing up the wall as if to get higher or closer to thier ear. I switch it up once in awhile. They ususaly fall for it and put thier heads closer to the roach. I tell them they hear a voice very faint, I make them roll to hear better. eventualy they hear thier answer it says "spueeeee click clik spek speeeeee clik tk tk tk !"
They ask what it means , to where I go in to my speech of' Who am I ?'
DMs that won't let the players lose aren't any fun, no arguments here, but ones that live solely to kill the PCs tend to be worse. The ideal DM finds a nice balance between the two, if a character does something really stupid, he pays for it, if, however, he's going to die because he rolled a one on a simple skill that he uses every day it might not be such a bad idea to fudge the roll a little. You might be surprised at some of the horror stories told on the DnD boards, doubtless most of them are exaggerated, but you get DMs who honestly seem to think that it's their job to make the party fail, no matter what. 'I roll my gather information roll." "You ask the wrong question and a mob comes to kill you." "I run away" "You can't, they've surrounded you, they get a surprise round..." etc.

I have the PHB and have played DnD online (Amazing group in NWN, not quite DnD, but it was very close, what with their custom scripts etc.) I am, however, growing tired of looking for players in my area, they all either won't let me play because I'm under 18, or they play at noon on Tuesdays, hardly useful to me. As such I have really no stories to tell.

Doodler
2005-Dec-22, 10:59 PM
Neverwinter Nights was a fantastic conversion of the system. Especially on semi-persistant servers when playing in Dungeon Master mode.

Moose
2005-Dec-22, 11:10 PM
DMs that won't let the players lose aren't any fun, no arguments here, but ones that live solely to kill the PCs tend to be worse. The ideal DM finds a nice balance between the two, if a character does something really stupid, he pays for it, if, however, he's going to die because he rolled a one on a simple skill that he uses every day it might not be such a bad idea to fudge the roll a little.

I should clarify something.

There was a story floating around at one point that a player (one of the SW games, IIRC) would intentionally shoot himself in the head before every battle as an intimidation technique, knowing that he had far more than enough hit points to survive it (and the battle).

If I were DMing that situation, I would invoke the "unresisted attack" rule and that character would drop dead, with what's left of his head smeared across 10 feet of wall behind him.

A stupid action will have consequences. A deliberately stupid action will have dire consequences. Thankfully, my players weren't stupid, and definitely not deliberately stupid. Not even our munchkin.

(Although, I did put the Paladin's head through a brick and aluminium siding wall (with resulting injuries) when he made the mistake of 1) trying to wrestle a 20 foot flying bee to the ground with insufficient ballast, and 2) letting go to try and draw his munchkin greatsword. I believe my exact words were "... to within an inch of your life ..." when the cleric showed up to pour what was left of his brains back into his ears. Our munchkin learned something about ballistic physics and inelastic collisions that day, I will say. The NPC local mage was quite upset at the damage to his home, especially as the bees and ants were only a threat to those who insisted upon remaining outdoors when they swarmed.)

In any case, raise dead and/or resurrect spells are common enough in DND. Their mere existance devalues death as much of a threat. So long as the cleric survives, the rogue can feel free to remove traps the hard way. *shrug*

One consequence of our unspoken "don't create needless hard feelings" policy was that nobody bothered to keep raise dead or resurrect spells close to hand. The players behaved as if there was no coming back if their characters died. We all believed it as far as suspension of disbelief could take us, so the DMs could use the threat of imminent death to its full effect, even if we didn't have to invoke it.

When watching Lord of the Rings, you know darn well that Frodo isn't going to die, even while he was dying. That doesn't make his story any less compelling. Not when told by a good storyteller, anyway.

As for the implied correlation between "story driven" and "monty haul" campaigns, I think you'll find it's a logical fallacy. It's been my experience that roll players tend to monty haul far more than role players. I assure you (with the possible exception of the munchkin who never DMed anyway), we strove for the latter.

Moose
2005-Dec-22, 11:18 PM
Neverwinter Nights was a fantastic conversion of the system. Especially on semi-persistant servers when playing in Dungeon Master mode.

Yeah, it's a lot of fun. Unfortunately, though, the respawn models and/or inevitable damage reduction on bosses are often set so as to make it impossible to play finesse rogues.

If you're anything other than a half-orc fighter with a double-axe or a buffing dire-mace cleric, it's almost impossible to make any sort of headway. Couple that with a difficult timezone as mine, and you're there twiddling your thumbs most of the evening waiting for someone with whom you can tag along.

Combine that with the invariable countermeasures against hide in plain sight which make it far too arduous to be any sort of a sneak rogue unless you take a shadowdancer level...

It's why I gave up NWN multiplay. Can't stand the armors anyway. My preferred character, a female elvish (1 part) fighter / (2 part) rogue, never wore armor (because of the smell), instead, she relied on her stiffened dex and on mage and monk gear to protect her.

darkhunter
2005-Dec-23, 12:06 AM
There has got to another Killer DM in here.

[Raises hand]

Guilty--to a point.

I don't "cheat", I don't fudge rolls against the characters, I just use every thing that the enemy has to it's most effecient and deadly manner.

I don't abide outright stupidity in the campaigns I GM (Rifts, D&D/Pallidium Fantasy RPG). I don't set out to kill the players*, but I am fairly deadly. New players in my world(s) tend to think I'm an easy mark right off the bat because I'm fairly lenient in character creation--if they can logically explain how the became their character (i.e. a really good backstory) I tend to let them play it. Their beleif in my good nature usually comes to a halt when they realize that there's always something bigger and meaner than they are hanging around, and that some NPC's are actually spies for the bad guy(s)....and what they do in one champaign affects the world history for their next one :)

My memorable characters:

Black Eagle. Started as a fighter, died a lot. Changed class to a thief--died a lot, then finally became a cleric--then died a lot. He eventually retired with 1 point of con left from his original 18, and had a fondness for carrots as a result of being shape-shifted into a rabbit for much o one adventure. For the record--he wasn't stupid, just unluck in that every single time we were ambushed, he would dodge out of the way and purley by chance (the DM rolled where we could see it--no fudging) would end up right in the middle of the bad guys...

Darkhunter (NPC Dragon)--I put him in one part of a cave so the party would go the way I wanted them to (had plans for that section later on). The party attacked him and got in a really good shot with a magic arrow and he made a run for it--badly wounded in the tail. He later joined forces with an evil high level mage to destroy the party--mage double crosses him by turning him into a dracoliche that the mage thinks he can control (big mistake--the mage didn't survive the experience).

At the end of the day, I've had an anchient deep wyrm dracoliche running around in my world for most of it's recorded history. No party has been able to defeat him--even with a one-shot adventure with the party custom building some very high level characters to defeat him (anything in any of the monsterous compeniums with a human + intelligence goes, a million exp, and gold to by any macic items in any referece book (to include dragon magazine....).

In my current Rifts campain I have a partial conversion borg and "water elemental" Dee-Bee on a secret mission to find out what happened to an expedition in search of "Project Archangel" (Moved from Washington state to the middle of the Pacific Ocean--yes, it's the Orion from Footfall[/l]) and there are so many plot twists already that the players have lost track, but they're having a fine old time getting into some goo fights on the way. BTW, you know you're an evil DM if [i]rats can nearly take down a Glitterboy (ok, so they had rocket launcher and deflector sheilds ;) )


*Except when I GM Paranioa--when the players start out with 9 clones you can expect a high body count :)

wayneee
2005-Dec-23, 01:14 AM
[Raises hand]


Darkhunter (NPC Dragon)--I put him in one part of a cave so the party would go the way I wanted them to (had plans for that section later on). The party attacked him and got in a really good shot with a magic arrow and he made a run for it--badly wounded in the tail. He later joined forces with an evil high level mage to destroy the party--mage double crosses him by turning him into a dracoliche that the mage thinks he can control (big mistake--the mage didn't survive the experience).

At the end of the day, I've had an anchient deep wyrm dracoliche running around in my world for most of it's recorded history. No party has been able to defeat him--even with a one-shot adventure with the party custom building some very high level characters to defeat him (anything in any of the monsterous compeniums with a human + intelligence goes, a million exp, and gold to by any macic items in any referece book (to include dragon magazine...
Well that good to hear:clap:

Some of my favorite Characters were actualy my Evil Bad Guy NPC's

I reinvented Smog , with a twist. Ancient Dragons are suppose to be Very intelligent. So as you remember, Frodo saw that Smog had treasure imbedded into his chest. I took that fact and extended it . Smog actualy had the Dwarven slaves use precise treasures to embedd into is chest, Things like Shields of Missle protection, + 5 Iron plate, various jewels of ressistance, an orb of Anti magic ,several detection devices, It filled a page and a half, but I wrote it all down.
But my favorite part of smog were his gauntlets, fashioned to resemble Xmen's Wolverines claws. Smogs Gauntlets bore 4 two handed swords each of various magic . One of the swords was Vorpal, and Another had life stealing properties. When all was said and done Claw/Claw/Bite took on a whole new meaning. To believe that Smog could be killed by one Arrow tsk tsk:naughty:

Hugh Jass
2005-Dec-23, 07:40 PM
Good to hear others like to think dragons are pretty close to invincible. The group I played with in college knew how I felt about dragons, (basically the MM was a rough outline for weenie dragons). I spent a whole bunch of time making this huge elaborate map that our party found while one of the others were DMing. There were 7 of us in the dorm and really three of us took rounds as DM. On this map was a picture of a dragon, I of course had made him up as an NPC, because it was cool, but didn’t think they would go searching him out. When they basically said as a group “lets go kill the dragon” I started introducing NPCs telling them it was a really bad idea and trying to get them sidetracked on other cool quests. Nope they were set, and they knew how I felt about dragons, but they also knew what kinda treasure would be in store, stuff they had no hope of finding anywhere else. Well I didn’t just want to kill them off so I got them to hire about 20 mid level fighters and/or barbarians. Well two NPCs survived and the one cleric in our party, I was actually a bit disappointed, I didn't think they had a chance, a few lucky rolls here and there, a few rounds where the dragon flat out missed, but that’s the way it ended up.

That group was pretty fun, we normally bent considerably the rules on character generation without going too overboard. My favorite character was for an adventure that our DM wanted us to be ~level 20 or something I don’t remember exactly. So I made a level 20 monk with psyonics (sp?) and a magical energy bladed vorpal sword was his only weapon. Yep a jedi.

I’ve played off and on (but not for the last ~10 years or so) for as long as I can remember. My older brother and all my older cousins would get into marathon games with miniatures way back in the late 70s early 80s, between all of us we had HUGE armies of miniatures, (somewhere around 150 all lovingly painted and cared for.) broken into Good, Neutral, and Evil of course. We took very liberally from Lord of the Rings, but also had the knights of the round table, Vikings, loads of giants. The playing area was my Aunts three bedroom house the game would last for about a week always culminating in some massive battle in the front room. The winner was always the one that could politically maneuver the largest part of the Neutral army to their side, since it included the cloud and storm giants.

In the early 90’s late 80’s I tried with a couple different groups of friends to get into some of the other games out there but we never took off. Shadowrun (BA Blog mentioned this and some of those guys got off topic talking about shape shifters as the best character choice, made me feel good, because the one character ever I made was a weretiger) Vampire masquerade, Starwars game. Might have been a couple others, we only tried once or twice, and went right back to D&D.

wayneee
2005-Dec-23, 09:23 PM
Im Sorry I said Frodo , and it was indeed Bilbo who looked upon Smog , surprized none of you caught me on that

Moose
2005-Dec-23, 09:39 PM
Yeah, sorry, I sort of noticed it, but as I haven't read The Hobbit, I wasn't sure enough of myself to comment. While we're on the subject, though, isn't it Smaug rather than Smog?

wayneee
2005-Dec-24, 12:29 AM
Yeah, sorry, I sort of noticed it, but as I haven't read The Hobbit, I wasn't sure enough of myself to comment. While we're on the subject, though, isn't it Smaug rather than Smog?
You may be right Id have to look it up.

Hugh Jass
2005-Dec-24, 12:36 AM
Im Sorry I said Frodo , and it was indeed Bilbo who looked upon Smog , surprized none of you caught me on that
caught and ridiculed are two seperate things. I think it speaks volumes about how far you have come in the respect realm as a poster.:cool:

LurchGS
2005-Dec-24, 12:41 AM
blast! there goes my chance to ridicule. darn darn darn

(it was Smaug/Bilbo)

wayneee
2005-Dec-24, 04:57 AM
I had invented a Magic item that seemed to make Dragon Magazzine through no posting by me. It was just somthing that I have DMed in high school, brought to college, and a few conventions. Years later I learn that the item is in France and in Dragon Magazine. The funny thing is, the item is a tongue-in-cheek item, not realy serious (except for its special secret ability)

tell me if you have heard of it

The Wand of Wand Making: Item has unlimited charges , produces at word comand a wand per round. the wand is a Wand of Wand Making with unlimited charges.
I have had Players use the WOWM in creative ways , from using the wands for camp fires, Dam a stream, ,made into crossbow bolts in sieged castle , some one actualy choked some one by putting the end into its mouth and used the command word. But No one has ever quessed the Seccret power in the 20 years I have gamed it

Philip A
2005-Dec-24, 11:37 AM
My favourite game to play in was called Dominion, written by an old schoolmate who later became a playwright. The mechanics were somewhat unwieldy* but the background and character classes were fanatastic. Basically, Man has colonized our solar system and Sirius, now just preparing for the next leap forward. One of the exploration ships returns to Earth long overdue, having been thought lost in space. The crew don't appear to have aged, declare they have found God, and brought him back to Earth. Alien 'Brothers of Man' arrive, so now mankind looks to be on a fast track to paradise. Unfortunately, the 'God' is in fact the leader of a nasty alien empire. There is a war, in which Earth and the solar system are defeated. Some survivors flee to Sirius, which is then invaded. Most of the planet is overrun, then the game starts... I was a bitter ex-Earth Army guerilla, hiding in the ruins of the capital. Good fun, especially with the game writer GMing. Hard though.

My favourite game as a GM was the last one I ran. About 15 years ago I had a character who became a D&D god (remember the gold box?). I decided that since I had left the Prime things had gone downhill in the area, and 200 years later the government was a fascist mono-religion dictatorship with a strong propagandist streak. The religious authorities hate all non-humans (enemies of mankind etc) and different religions are all banned, under pain of death. There is a rebellion of sorts trying to get enough support to overthrow the government. I dropped the PC's in and left it as an entirely open campaign, without the standard 'You meet an NPC who gives you missions' etc. Worked well enough, but PC casualties really racked up after a few stupid decisions, which incidentally caused the governemt to put a doomsday plan of demon summoning into process - 'There is a rebellion, the cities will be attacked by hordes of 'Goblins' (any non-human was a 'goblin') so we are going to take all the women to safety..' In reality, all the women were to be used as demonvessels. The gods and dragons got involved, cue an apocalyptic showdown. Which the PCs were going to lose due to some bad planning, but anyway...



*OK, unplayable.

darkhunter
2005-Dec-24, 06:25 PM
. I dropped the PC's in and left it as an entirely open campaign, without the standard 'You meet an NPC who gives you missions' etc.

I always tend towards an open campaign. The only "missions" I use tend to be along the lines of "There's legends of whatever out there somewhere (the whatever being something the players would consider really cool)"--with no due date or timeline. The "side quests" are where they find all the clues as to where the whatever is. I have had a group hit tenth level soley on random encounters because they focused soley on the "Original Goal"...they eventually died of acute stupidity, slain by a single 8th level mage.... They were tenth level with only the stuff they started out at first level with. The next time we played, they had learned thier lesson and found within the first few sessions that they were being set up by the individual who gave them their original goal.... :)

edit fixed coding

wayneee
2005-Dec-24, 11:49 PM
I always tend towards an open campaign. The only "missions" I use tend to be along the lines of "There's legends of whatever out there somewhere (the whatever being something the players would consider really cool)"--with no due date or timeline. The "side quests" are where they find all the clues as to where the whatever is. I have had a group hit tenth level soley on random encounters because they focused soley on the "Original Goal"...they eventually died of acute stupidity, slain by a single 8th level mage.... They were tenth level with only the stuff they started out at first level with. The next time we played, they had learned thier lesson and found within the first few sessions that they were being set up by the individual who gave them their original goal.... :)

edit fixed coding
I agree , open format is the only wat to go, I would use modules here and there to save me homework. MOst people realy liked my killer DM mode, if they ever had a character survive past 10th level , they knew they deserved it. I instituted a ruling on Artifacts for all other DM's in our group that reached a membership of 40 something. WE doled out Artifacts to DM's so that there were no duplicates. Only 4 Hammer of Thunderbolts exist, one is actualy still unfound to this day to the DM's credit. I believe our Clubs rules tamed down the goofy and monty hall quests.

But my point was to let the dice rule, yes sometimes the dice roled stupidly, sometimes the dice ruined long term plans. But I felt it was my duty to let the dice decide.

Once I had a High level character, had become Ruler of a small empire. He was betrayed by a close NPC and the death of my characters son resulted, and the loss of an Artifact. Well I had him captured, and him thrown in jail, and tortured for information. He remained silent and would not divulge his conspirator. My character threw his hands up and called for his execution. The DM was happy as his dice roles twarted my attempts to discover the enemy, my rule would soon be over because as I could not keep my residents safe from an unknown enemy. This DM had expresssed his displeasure of me obtaining a kingdom, he did have it out for me. I had another Club DM moniter him as he DMed me. But everything was on the up and up

So here I was, going to execute a fairly powerful NPC, without any information. It was a 'lose lose' situation, but I was stuck to it.
The friend of the NPC was a Cleric NPC of my creation so I was allowed Play him to give the final rites to the soon to be excuted.

The Cleric walks in and tells his friend that he wishes it would have been different, and remineses about old times and of the times were his life was saved by him. He tells him before he dies to accept the forgiveness of the Clerics God and prays for him. All Along the DM is rolling reaction rolls, nothing happens. Suddenly the Guards show up at the door, it time to have the execution. In a final attempt my cleric Kneels and pleads to the NPC to accept God. Suddenly from behind the screen, the monitering DM says 'whats that roll represent?' Thats reaction roll he says. Moniter" well thats significant isnt it?" Yeah he admits but he says lets see how signifigant . He tells me to roll a six, I roll a '6' I have detected the prescence of my God
I lay it on thick and say I will take your place on the chop block brother if you will accept God. DM Rolls and suddenly the NPC is Crying , and spilling the beans about the conspirators . So profound was the change that the character changed Alingments in that instance and was turned into a Paladin from a fighter.

After that My Cleric would not allow the Guards to take him and fought the gaurds and Quite a few others. It was a turning point in my newly formed kingdom . As I was made aware of my enemy , and attacked directly. Twarting some nefarious plans from other DM's that I have DMed for and killed in Campaigns.

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-25, 01:13 PM
Amongst my favorite characters was a guy who wasn't very smart, but had really good dexterity, so he was a really good craftsman/artisan.
Only really special thing was that he had a bit of miraculous magic, ie. he could ask his god for a favour and have a reasonal chance of getting it.
He's the only one I've heard of who's been stupid enough to ask of his god upon meeting Her, not once but three times, "What can I do for you?"
Made for very easy campaign starts though.

darkhunter
2005-Dec-26, 05:37 AM
Among my favorites was Guru. Straight up fighter, all the right stats. Had a bad rap for being a bloodthirsty savage that would happily take his nice two-handed sword and slay anyone who looked at him funny. Thing was, it was several encounters before he saw teneed to draw the sword and not just thump the enemy over the head with his fist....