PDA

View Full Version : Turn Out The Lights,



Maksutov
2005-Dec-27, 06:02 AM
The party's over... (http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news;_ylt=AiC6iBvqmiFJwVcfRVUe__Q5nYcB?slug=ap-mondaynightfinale&prov=ap&type=lgns)

After 36 years ABC's Monday Night Football has concluded.

Lots of memories there. And not just sports. Such as Cosell informing the nation that John Lennon had been killed. The Juice trying to be an announcer. Keith Jackson kicking off the show in 1970. Dandy Don singing the referenced song when things got out of hand score-wise.

And lots more.

At the conclusion tonight Al Michaels just about lost it. Good thing Madden was there to act as a sure rudder.

Ah, the irony!

First Monday Night Football game, Cleveland 31, NY Jets 21.

Last Monday Night Football game, New England 31, NY Jets 21.

Of course ESPN will pick up the time next year, but it won't be the same.

Thanks to Roone Arledge and the gang, and Jack Buck and Hank Stram, who announced the game on radio when I had had enough of Cosell.

Turn out the lights... http://www.cosgan.de/images/midi/musik/b025.gif

Trebuchet
2005-Dec-28, 04:05 AM
My favorite Cosell moment was a Dolphins game in the early-mid 1970's. Miami had dominated the first half, to the point where Howard apologized to the audience for the lousy game.

In the second half, the other team came roaring back, leaving Miami with (I think) a six point lead with a few minutes to go. Miami had the ball on about their own 40 but had three straight losses and were something like 4th and 35 on their own 15 yard line, facing a punt which would leave the other team (don't remember who) with good field position. When the offensive unit came back out Cosell was astounded. I recall him saying "Shula's lost his marbles". Griese took the snap, turned around and ran as fast as he could into, and out of, his own end zone. Safety, still a four point lead, and a free kick instead of a punt under pressure.

I really enjoyed MNF in those days but lost interest in it in recent years. Still, it's kind of sad to see the end of an era.

Candy
2005-Dec-28, 04:26 AM
I heard Cosell had a photo graphic memory. :think:

LurchGS
2005-Dec-29, 06:46 AM
I dunno - it would come in handy for a lawyer..

I gave up on football (US) years ago... no other nation on the planet can take a 1 hour game and make it last for 3. BORING

HenrikOlsen
2005-Dec-29, 12:33 PM
Well, after all it is designed1 to accomodate lots of commercial breaks.

1) or at least gives that impression.

Renderking Fisk
2005-Dec-29, 01:08 PM
The party's over... (http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news;_ylt=AiC6iBvqmiFJwVcfRVUe__Q5nYcB?slug=ap-mondaynightfinale&prov=ap&type=lgns)

Thanks to Roone Arledge and the gang, and Jack Buck and Hank Stram, who announced the game on radio when I had had enough of Cosell.

My most vivid memory of "Monday Night Football" was seeing people turn on their TV's to WATCH the game and turn on the Radios to LISTEN to it.

Cosell must have been one of the most concedded and arrogant people in the media, annoying isn't even strong enough of a word. Ironicly he wrote a book: WHAT'S WRONG WITH SPORTS (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0671769197/102-5992732-3197748?v=glance&n=283155)... never knowing that people tuned in to watch the game but turned the volume down and the radio on to tune him out...

Swift
2005-Dec-29, 02:18 PM
Cosell must have been one of the most concedded and arrogant people in the media, annoying isn't even strong enough of a word. Ironicly he wrote a book: WHAT'S WRONG WITH SPORTS (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0671769197/102-5992732-3197748?v=glance&n=283155)... never knowing that people tuned in to watch the game but turned the volume down and the radio on to tune him out...
I recall a survey in TV Guide from that time period. People were asked which TV sports caster they liked the most and which one they hated the most. Cosell won both categories by large margins (obviously less than 50% in at least one of those, IIRC, it was like 35-40% in each).

I had sort of mixed feelings about him, and they related to his knowledge of a given sport. I actually thought he was very good with boxing, ok with football, but terrible with baseball and most other sports.

farmerjumperdon
2005-Dec-29, 02:24 PM
Best part about MNF was their original theme song, a great number by Chicago with lots of horns that built to a cool crescendo at the end. Can't remember the name of that cut though. I also thought Alex Karras, from the earlier years, was a very good announcer.

ToSeek
2005-Dec-29, 03:18 PM
I dunno - it would come in handy for a lawyer..

I gave up on football (US) years ago... no other nation on the planet can take a 1 hour game and make it last for 3. BORING

I watch football, but I generally do it with something else to do alongside me, like read the newspaper or do Christmas cards.

farmerjumperdon
2005-Dec-29, 07:48 PM
I dunno - it would come in handy for a lawyer..

I gave up on football (US) years ago... no other nation on the planet can take a 1 hour game and make it last for 3. BORING

Yeah, at least with soccer the powers that be have limited the boredom to only 90 minutes or so.

LurchGS
2005-Dec-29, 08:26 PM
lol

when they started broadcasting football in the US, it was a one hour game and two hours of TV time (halftime, commercials, etc). It has grown significantly - now the show takes 3 hours.. so think on that. A one hour game... three hours of tv... that's 2 hours of no-football per game. Not even golf is that boring

ToSeek
2005-Dec-29, 08:28 PM
Baseball has gotten a lot worse, too.

LurchGS
2005-Dec-29, 08:32 PM
yeah - but it, at least, was designed for the interruption. You know that in the next 10 minutes you'll have a chance to run down the hall to the porcelain museum and grab a brew on the way back to the easy chair.

Though some networks, I agree, are aggregious, and toss in commercials between batters

farmerjumperdon
2005-Dec-29, 08:44 PM
yeah - but it, at least, was designed for the interruption. You know that in the next 10 minutes you'll have a chance to run down the hall to the porcelain museum and grab a brew on the way back to the easy chair.

Though some networks, I agree, are aggregious, and toss in commercials between batters

Baseball is special to me though. I have a hard time watching on TV, but I abhor most TV anyway. I usually catch a few games in the post-season when the quality of play is top notch.

But something about baseball is timeless. Maybe that's it, it has no time. You bat until you get on base or make an out, no shot clock. Your team is up until you make 3 outs, the game is over when 9 innings have ended - regardless of how long that takes. And if it takes more than 9 innings, so be it - you play until somebody wins. Even the "time outs" are just informal little chats with almost no rules. The catcher wants to chat with the pitcher, no problem. Everybody just chills for a few seconds, the battery decides where they want to go for dinner, then the game resumes. The game is not guided or interferred with by time. It is timeless.

ToSeek
2005-Dec-29, 08:45 PM
yeah - but it, at least, was designed for the interruption. You know that in the next 10 minutes you'll have a chance to run down the hall to the porcelain museum and grab a brew on the way back to the easy chair.

Though some networks, I agree, are aggregious, and toss in commercials between batters

My point was that once upon a time an average baseball game ran about 2.5 hours. These days many of them frequently run over 3, and the less said about some World Series games the better.

ToSeek
2005-Dec-29, 08:47 PM
Baseball is special to me though. I have a hard time watching on TV, but I abhor most TV anyway. I usually catch a few games in the post-season when the quality of play is top notch.

But something about baseball is timeless. Maybe that's it, it has no time. You bat until you get on base or make an out, no shot clock. Your team is up until you make 3 outs, the game is over when 9 innings have ended - regardless of how long that takes. And if it takes more than 9 innings, so be it - you play until somebody wins. Even the "time outs" are just informal little chats with almost no rules. The catcher wants to chat with the pitcher, no problem. Everybody just chills for a few seconds, the battery decides where they want to go for dinner, then the game resumes. The game is not guided or interferred with by time. It is timeless.

That's definitely one of the great things about baseball - not many other games like that, certainly not any major ones. Too many football games, on the other hand, are decided by when the team scores, not whether - if you're behind by less than a touchdown late in a game, you don't want to score too quickly because it give the other team a chance to come back.

LurchGS
2005-Dec-29, 08:53 PM
I like other odd things about baseball - the foul line is *in* the field of play, the overall size and dimension of the playing are not defined...

and even though I play softball, it still boggles me that you can - with relative ease - high a spherical object with a cylindrical object and make it go more or less where you want it to go

LurchGS
2005-Dec-29, 08:58 PM
My point was that once upon a time an average baseball game ran about 2.5 hours. These days many of them frequently run over 3, and the less said about some World Series games the better.

Ah, yeah - particularly the 'important' games. The ones I don't watch because the Cubs are not playiing. Or I don't watch them because the Cubs ARE playing, and I get all tantrumy when they lose.

It does seem to depend on the network, though, and the pitcher. Some pitchers take *forever* between pitches... others crank right along.. a difference of 10-20 second per pitch can add up over the course of 100 pitches

SeanF
2005-Dec-29, 08:59 PM
My point was that once upon a time an average baseball game ran about 2.5 hours. These days many of them frequently run over 3, and the less said about some World Series games the better.
Yeah, but baseball's like chess - it's what's going on between the action that's interesting! :D

LurchGS
2005-Dec-29, 09:01 PM
to me, it's a little bit of both

SeanF
2005-Dec-29, 09:02 PM
I like other odd things about baseball - the foul line is *in* the field of play, the overall size and dimension of the playing are not defined...
Well, the dimensions of the infield are defined, and there are minimums for the outfield distances. But, you're right, no two ballparks are the same, and that adds an extra bit of interest. :)


and even though I play softball, it still boggles me that you can - with relative ease - high a spherical object with a cylindrical object and make it go more or less where you want it to go
It boggles me that you can watch that spherical object flying through the air and calculate virtually subconsciously where you're going to need to be to catch it. :)

Kristophe
2005-Dec-29, 09:09 PM
Baseball is probably the only sport -- excluding golf or bowling, I suppose, but I'm not exposed to them with my blessing or against my will -- where the announcers can talk about nothing and appease the viewers or listeners. If someone starts going on and on about something in a hockey game, or a football game, they're missing the action. A lot of the times you actually need them to be calling the game because there's more going on on the field than you can keep track of yourself (unless you're a super fan). In baseball, the stats actually give you something to think about.

Kristophe
2005-Dec-29, 09:11 PM
It boggles me that you can watch that spherical object flying through the air and calculate virtually subconsciously where you're going to need to be to catch it. :)

And that's the easy part! It's a miracle of nature that you can figure out where and when to swing a skinny piece of wood at a tiny sphere passing by at 90 mph.

Swift
2005-Dec-29, 09:18 PM
Baseball is special to me though. I have a hard time watching on TV, but I abhor most TV anyway. I usually catch a few games in the post-season when the quality of play is top notch.

But something about baseball is timeless. Maybe that's it, it has no time. You bat until you get on base or make an out, no shot clock. Your team is up until you make 3 outs, the game is over when 9 innings have ended - regardless of how long that takes. And if it takes more than 9 innings, so be it - you play until somebody wins. Even the "time outs" are just informal little chats with almost no rules. The catcher wants to chat with the pitcher, no problem. Everybody just chills for a few seconds, the battery decides where they want to go for dinner, then the game resumes. The game is not guided or interferred with by time. It is timeless.
Absolutely right. I think it funny that Major League Baseball has tried to speed up games in recent years (such as less time for those pitcher-catcher chats). There is nothing better than some fine Sunday afternoon in June, sitting at the ballpark, with a brew and a dog, watching a game. Why would you want to rush that?

Speaking of meetings at the mound reminds me of the great scene from Bull Durham.... "Candlesticks make a nice gift" - that's why coaches get the big bucks. :lol:

LurchGS
2005-Dec-29, 09:21 PM
You need to pick the correct announcers - and the major networks don't cut the mustard - need WGN or WTBS, mostly, though ESPN has it's moments.

the color commentators know the game from having been successful at it (steve stone -funny funny man! Ditto for Don Sutton) and the primary announcers grew up around the game (The Cary boys, mostly).

you just try to catch one of the NBC commntators cracking off bad puns on the air!

ToSeek
2005-Dec-29, 09:29 PM
Ah, yeah - particularly the 'important' games. The ones I don't watch because the Cubs are not playiing. Or I don't watch them because the Cubs ARE playing, and I get all tantrumy when they lose.

It does seem to depend on the network, though, and the pitcher. Some pitchers take *forever* between pitches... others crank right along.. a difference of 10-20 second per pitch can add up over the course of 100 pitches

There was an Orioles relief pitcher in the 1983 World Series named (I think) Dan Stanhouse, who was the bane of reporters because he was so slow that they would frequently miss their deadlines just because he was pitching.