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View Full Version : Moon "hoax": Neil Armstrong invited speaker



The Bad Astronomer
2005-Dec-30, 06:50 AM
One of Bart Sibrel's pieces of "evidence" of the Moon hoax is that, Sibrel claims, Neil Armstrong never talks about the mission. Sibrel's take is this is because Armstrong feels guilty about faking the landing. Of course, that's garbage: Armstrong has spoken many times, including recently on "60 Minutes".

I bring this up because on my blog was a Google ad for this: Neil Armstrong gives invited lectures (http://www.nationwidespeakers.com/speakers/neil_armstrong.htm)! I was surprised by this, because he does shun the limelight.

That's interesting. And cool. And another in a long line of reasons Sibrel is wrong.

Maksutov
2005-Dec-30, 07:06 AM
Fantastic. Wasn't able to find what the rates are. One wonders if there are special rates for a timed visit to a BB?

What I did find was that per paragraph six in the write-up about him, Armstrong is a very busy person. His time is probably so booked and definitely of such great value that he needs to see it's spent smartly, correctly, and effectively, e.g., only dealing with meaningful issues and projects.

PhantomWolf
2005-Dec-30, 07:08 AM
You don't think you might be able to "invite" him to spend a night on the board chtting with the other posters?

mickal555
2005-Dec-30, 04:38 PM
You don't think you might be able to "invite" him to spend a night on the board chtting with the other posters?

That would be so totally super awesome!!!
!

!!

!!!!

























!

Maksutov
2005-Dec-30, 04:56 PM
That would be so totally super awesome!!!
!

!!

!!!!

























!So, do you like the idea?

mickal555
2005-Dec-30, 05:10 PM
So, do you like the idea?

What?

Oh yeah, I suppose it just might be super duper pan galatic zip zap zoop hyper dimentional universially ifinite good!!!


!!!

jrkeller
2005-Dec-30, 05:45 PM
One of Bart Sibrel's pieces of "evidence" of the Moon hoax is that, Sibrel claims, Neil Armstrong never talks about the mission. Sibrel's take is this is because Armstrong feels guilty about faking the landing. Of course, that's garbage: Armstrong has spoken many times, including recently on "60 Minutes".

I bring this up because on my blog was a Google ad for this: Neil Armstrong gives invited lectures (http://www.nationwidespeakers.com/speakers/neil_armstrong.htm)! I was surprised by this, because he does shun the limelight.

That's interesting. And cool. And another in a long line of reasons Sibrel is wrong.


BA,

Sibrel or one of his clones has been taking quite a trashing on this topic over at the yahoo apollo-hoax group. Bart has actually pullled that section off his website.

Furthermore,

Here's an interview (http://www.c-span.org/apa/nasa.asp?CatCodePairs=Current_events,NASA) of Neil Armstrong you can listen to. BTW it's not a NASA site.

Hugh Jass
2005-Dec-30, 05:49 PM
I'm still a little partial to Buzz's approach, but I suppose they can still be debated verbally.

Bob B.
2005-Dec-30, 09:16 PM
Bart has actually pullled that section off his website.
Yes, Sibrel has apparently decided the 'no interview' lie is no longer convincing. As such, he has modified his Web page to include a new misrepresentation. Item #6 on his top 10 list (http://www.moonmovie.com/moonmovie/default.asp?ID=7) now says,

"Neil Armstrong, the first man to supposedly walk on the moon, recently granted an interview to 60 Minutes. Ed Bradley said, "You sometimes seems uncomfortable with your celebrity, that you’d rather not have all of this attention." Armstong (sic) replied, "No, I just don’t deserve it." Collins refuses to be interviewed. Aldrin, who granted an interview, threatened to sue us if we showed it to anyone."

Of course anyone who saw the interview knows Armstrong continued to explain what he meant by that comment. Armstrong said he was not handpicked to be the first man on the moon; he was only selected to be commander of that one mission and, as things played out, he fell in line to be the one to take that first step. He said circumstances put him in that position, nothing more.

Armstrong came across in the interview as a very humble man, which in my opinion makes him an even more extraordinary individual. Bart Sibrel, on the other hand, apparently saw the interview as an opportunity to further his efforts to swindle people by misrepresenting Armstrong's comments.

BenderBendingRodriguez
2005-Dec-30, 09:21 PM
Guess that shows that ** wouldn't recognise humility if it bit him in the lower back?

SolusLupus
2005-Dec-31, 05:08 AM
Guess that shows that ** wouldn't recognise humility if it bit him in the lower back?

If you're in a desert, anything remotely liquid looks tasty. I'll let you draw your own conclusions about what I mean.

Well, not entirely. Basically, he's looking for anything to support his argument in a sea of arguments that gives no benefit to it. So he has to nitpick and take out of context anything that gives his argument credence, no matter how far from the original context and meaning that it's meant in.

On the other hand, he would be just as willing to point at someone and point out how noble and humble they are... if they're an HBer.

Gillianren
2005-Dec-31, 06:22 AM
Guess that shows that ** wouldn't recognise humility if it bit him in the lower back?

You know, I really, really didn't need the unfortunate mental image of **'s "lower back." (Ah, euphemisms!)

JayUtah
2006-Jan-02, 03:45 AM
Armstrong has frequently claimed that he found his X-15 piloting experience more rewarding and more significant than his Apollo 11 mission. Since it is his life and his career, it is his perogative to think that way; he need not follow the convention of second- or third-person history. But also we must consider that Apollo 11 was, for all intents and purposes, a test mission. Its only objective was to land and return, thus to fulfill Kennedy's challenge. Ignoring the spotlight of history, it is not inappropriate to consider Apollos 12 through 17 to be the truly successful missions in that they were "operational" missions.

kucharek
2006-Jan-02, 10:37 AM
In the biography, Armstrong explains very well, that from the outsides point of view, he declines nearly every request for appearances. But from his point of view, he has a very busy schedule. ** claim was silly even before 60 minutes

BertL
2006-Jan-02, 09:29 PM
Armstrong has frequently claimed that he found his X-15 piloting experience more rewarding and more significant than his Apollo 11 mission.
Of course his X-15 piloting experience was more rewarding! Out of these two it's his only piloting experience!!1

kucharek
2006-Jan-02, 09:41 PM
Of course his X-15 piloting experience was more rewarding! Out of these two it's his only piloting experience!!1
And we know he goofed up a few times. One time he overshot with his X-15 and was close to go for a landing at Palmdale airport. Would have been a planespotters dream. :-)

Jakenorrish
2006-Jan-02, 09:45 PM
http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=36561

Oh blimey, here we go again.... One born every minute I'm afraid folks!

SolusLupus
2006-Jan-02, 11:14 PM
http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=36561

Oh blimey, here we go again.... One born every minute I'm afraid folks!

Another day, another HBer. :)

Jakenorrish
2006-Jan-02, 11:16 PM
:)