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William_Thompson
2006-Jan-03, 10:27 AM
This is about as OT as possible for this forum. But I had a very good laugh after I stumbled on this and I wanted to share.

This must be an indication of what they think of American Pop Music in Vietnam (these are two guys in a Vietnamese Internet Cafe or Lab in a School)

This must be what the vietnamese think of USA pop culture and music:

I think it is streaming video so it will work even if you have dialup (http://www.tgan.net/forum/showthread.php?t=4526)

(direct link) (http://www.yeungocan.com/Music%20Videos/www.tgan.net%20-%20As%20Long%20As%20You%20Love%20Me.wmv)

sarongsong
2006-Jan-03, 10:10 PM
Well, that link locked up my computer nicely---in a similar vein, there's the South Koreans' filtering Western influences (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/02/international/asia/02korea.html?hp&ex=1136178000&en=f06cacf38dc8f861&ei=5094&partner=homepage) to Chinese youth.

William_Thompson
2006-Jan-05, 12:09 AM
Alright, this is better.
Try this link:
http://www.tgan.net/forum/showthread.php?t=4526
The funny video is on that page.

Candy
2006-Jan-05, 12:16 AM
Pretty snowflakes, thus far.

Candy
2006-Jan-05, 12:19 AM
I am not waiting another 30 minutes (dial up) to see someone making fun of me or wanting to be Americanized. I refuse! :naughty:

William_Thompson
2006-Jan-05, 12:19 AM
Well, that link locked up my computer nicely---in a similar vein, there's the South Koreans' filtering Western influences (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/02/international/asia/02korea.html?hp&ex=1136178000&en=f06cacf38dc8f861&ei=5094&partner=homepage) to Chinese youth.
That is amaizing!

Hey, are you in Korea or are you Korean? I know that Song is a Korean name.

William_Thompson
2006-Jan-05, 12:21 AM
I am not waiting another 30 minutes (dial up) to see someone making fun of me or wanting to be Americanized. I refuse! :think:
It is streaming, isn't it? I mean, the whole page loads and the little box in the middle of the page is where the video is. You just have to click on play.

Candy
2006-Jan-05, 12:22 AM
I didn't get that far. :D

William_Thompson
2006-Jan-05, 12:23 AM
Well, that link locked up my computer nicely---in a similar vein, there's the South Koreans' filtering Western influences (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/02/international/asia/02korea.html?hp&ex=1136178000&en=f06cacf38dc8f861&ei=5094&partner=homepage) to Chinese youth.

Maybe western culture is not so bad afterall!

SolusLupus
2006-Jan-05, 01:47 AM
I lived in Korea for 7 years, just to note. I'm not surprised by what's in that article at all.

Candy
2006-Jan-05, 10:20 AM
I'm bored. Okay, the time is 04:17 CST. Let's see how long this takes to load. :eek:

Candy
2006-Jan-05, 10:31 AM
Egads! I'm at 34% buffering, and I clicked on the As Long As You Love Me one.

Candy
2006-Jan-05, 10:46 AM
Egads! I'm at 34% buffering, and I clicked on the As Long As You Love Me one.Dang it, they played this on WGN already. It was great then, and it is still great! :clap:

sarongsong
2006-Jan-06, 06:48 AM
I lived in Korea for 7 years, just to note. I'm not surprised by what's in that article at all.Whether it's here or elsewhere, I would like to hear more about your experiences and impressions gained there.

SolusLupus
2006-Jan-06, 09:23 AM
Whether it's here or elsewhere, I would like to hear more about your experiences and impressions gained there.

What would you like to know, precisely? There's a lot to talk about. I can say that it's pretty much a lot of city there (that is, except for the wilderness that couldn't be populated by people...) I lived off the military bases, but went to school and interacted on the bases often, so I know a lot more about what goes on on the Army base than off it, more or less.

sarongsong
2006-Jan-11, 10:02 AM
Thanks, just now noticed your reply---mostly about the people and their outlook. I've read that South Koreans are one of the most digitally-connected citizenry on the planet, among other accomplishments, and wonder about how that affects their 'modern' culture. Did you have much interaction with the general population?

SolusLupus
2006-Jan-11, 04:20 PM
Thanks, just now noticed your reply---mostly about the people and their outlook. I've read that South Koreans are one of the most digitally-connected citizenry on the planet, among other accomplishments, and wonder about how that affects their 'modern' culture. Did you have much interaction with the general population?

I went to PC Bongs. They're pretty much a place you go into and pay some Won (the local currency; the W is supposed to be an interesting symbol, but I don't have the key for it) to play for a few hours. It's, like, 1000 Won per hour or something (that seems like a lot, but the exchange there is about 1000 Won per dollar. Good ol' inflation!)

Anyways, they are VERY digitally connected. I can't say how it affects businesses, but let me tell ya, when I go in those PC Bongs, there's many many people playing Star Craft and Diablo/Diablo 2. They are frikkin' GOOD at it, too; mainly because they set themselves to it with the devotion that they set themselves to anything else, and they play them throughout a major portion of their lives.

They're scary in that regard.

On the roads, Koreans are, in general, very aggressive drivers. Very dangerous on the roads there, especially if you're American (the Korean police are generally more likely to pull over an American than a Korean for disobeying traffic regulations).

Let's see.... delicacies there include fish, whether raw or cooked, spicy stuff (Kimchi, etc.), and all sorts of other fun stuff. You can get to anywhere in the cities (whether in Taegu, where I lived first, or in Seoul) by subway.

Koreans are generally taught to be polite and "unemotional", is the best way I can put it. The males, at least, are generally staid and don't express emotion often. I once saw a Korean guy push another to the ground, and they both didn't change the expressions on their faces. Was kinda funny. I also heard of a case where a woman was robbed by an older Korean, and she woke up while he was taking her stuff. So what did he do? He bowed to her, and said, "Sorry! Sorry!" then backed out of her apartment/house and vamoosed. Only in Korea.

In the cities, the American military bases are the only places with any greenery. The elderly Koreans generally don't mind the American military presence, but the younger generation is advocating the dispersement of the military. I once saw a large protest where a bunch of Korean students were protesting, and holding up a sign, where it said (in English) "End the barbarism of US troops"

They actually had a good point, though. The crime rate in Korea is actually very very low, and murders and such were a VERY big thing; everyone heard of it. The only few murders I heard about were accomplished by US military troops. One was a recruit who shot his commanding officer, and another was a man that beat to death a woman with boots. In both cases, the victimes were also American.

Anyways, that's all I can think about for now. I know that a lot of what I said wasn't really what you asked about, but you made me nostalgiac.

Oh, also, American men going to Korea tend to rather like the idea of the "submissive female" type of culture (which Korea does have), and a lot pick up wives from the Red Light District.

sarongsong
2006-Jan-11, 09:55 PM
...I know that a lot of what I said wasn't really what you asked about...Oh no, that was fine! Just reflecting on my overall impressions thru the years. One lasting memory is that my supervisor at the Hawaii telephone company (then GTE, since bought out by the Carlyle Group) was so impressed by Korean industriousness that she was learning the language. The few Koreans (all male) I've actually met seemed to possess that "unemotional" trait you described so well, to the point that whenever one particular student in Santa Cruz burst into laughter, he immediately had our attention to see what caused it.

Disinfo Agent
2006-Jan-11, 11:54 PM
Maybe western culture is not so bad afterall!The trouble with Western culture is that you can't get away from it.