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Grand_Lunar
2006-Jan-04, 03:33 AM
Today, I saw an episode of "Blue Planet", the one entitled 'The Deep'. And it got me to thinking:

Could military submarines assist in exploring the ocean floor? They could deploy an ROV and collect data. It's not like they're busy all the time, particularly the SSBNs.

Could this be possible?

swansont
2006-Jan-04, 03:42 PM
Manned boats can only go so deep, but I expect the navy has an interest in mapping the ocean floor, so I imagine they do collect data at least in coastal areas. Whether they tend to share this data is a separate question.

Here (http://www.military.com/soldiertech/0,14632,Soldiertech_UUV,,00.html) is an unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV), aka Remote Environmental Monitoring UnitS (REMUS).

HenrikOlsen
2006-Jan-05, 10:46 PM
Manned boats can only go so deep, but I expect the navy has an interest in mapping the ocean floor, so I imagine they do collect data at least in coastal areas. Whether they tend to share this data is a separate question.
They can only go to so deep, then they hit the bottom and can't go any deeper. :razz:
I think you've forgotten Trieste (http://seawifs.gsfc.nasa.gov/OCEAN_PLANET/HTML/trieste.html).

For the subgroup of manned boats that is navy subs you're probably right.

Dragon Star
2006-Jan-05, 10:52 PM
Holy Crap! 16,000 pounds per square inch of pressure, sheesh! One tough little sub that is!:clap:

swansont
2006-Jan-06, 12:31 PM
They can only go to so deep, then they hit the bottom and can't go any deeper. :razz:
I think you've forgotten Trieste (http://seawifs.gsfc.nasa.gov/OCEAN_PLANET/HTML/trieste.html).

For the subgroup of manned boats that is navy subs you're probably right.


While it was military, the Trieste was a bathyscaphe, not a submarine - she didn't have her own propulsion system, AFAIK. But I had forgotten about her.

HenrikOlsen
2006-Jan-06, 01:25 PM
If you look at pictures of her, you can see the propellers (http://www.dolomite.demon.co.uk/ddu/images/subs/trieste4.jpg).
She couldn't move far and she couldn't move fast but she could move.

What separates the bathyscaphe from other submarines is that due to the pressures it operates at it can't refill its ballast tanks with air to get positive buyancy, so it has lead shot ballast it releases instead.

Remember that you specifically said "manned boats", not subs, though it was in reference to a question about subs. :)

farmerjumperdon
2006-Jan-06, 01:54 PM
Yowza! Able to stand up to 16K psi (I wonder what it's limit is?) that thing has more structural strength than the average piece of rock. Wouldn't something like a piece of quartz crumble at that pressure?

Suppose I could go looking.

HenrikOlsen
2006-Jan-06, 02:54 PM
It would if the pressure was applied unevenly, hydrostatic pressure wouldn't crumble quartz unless it had impurities in the form of cavities.

swansont
2006-Jan-06, 03:19 PM
If you look at pictures of her, you can see the propellers (http://www.dolomite.demon.co.uk/ddu/images/subs/trieste4.jpg).
She couldn't move far and she couldn't move fast but she could move.

What separates the bathyscaphe from other submarines is that due to the pressures it operates at it can't refill its ballast tanks with air to get positive buyancy, so it has lead shot ballast it releases instead.

Remember that you specifically said "manned boats", not subs, though it was in reference to a question about subs. :)

Yes, I was being imprecise. In my mind boat = sub, from my navy days. I've been on a boomer (SSBN), but not a bathyscaphe. I don't think the former want to generally be anywhere near enough the ocean floor to explore it.

Grand_Lunar
2006-Jan-07, 03:04 AM
Hmm, quite the feedback.

Been reading "Blind Man's Bluff" recently. It seems the "fish" used on the USS Halibut would be ideal for exploring the ocean floor.

Also, seeing how for subs in the late sixties had a crush depth of about 2,000 feet, I say that leaves most of the continental shelf open to exploring.
For the abyssal plains, it seems ROVs from subs can be used.

Another idea; can an unmanned, unteathered vechile be used for sea exploration? Like a space probe?