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Eirik
2006-Jan-07, 05:31 AM
Heya all,

I suspect someone out there has a lot more electronics experieince than I, and I'd like to tap that if I can.

I have a five year old 32 inch Sony TV (I don't have the model number handy). It's worked fine until this evening. The picture suddenly went white, then the screen was filled with a single spiral white line that went from top to bottom (with a ghost of a picture behind it). After a few seconds, the TV shut off. I tried starting it again a couple times, but it did the same thing. The only difference is that the second and third time the screen slowly cycled between various primary colors, then shut off. Right now, it's off and unplugged.

Can anyone tell me what might be going on, and what I might expect to pay to have this fixed? I had hoped to keep this set at least another two years, but if it'll cost hundreds to fix, it won't be worth it.

Dragon Star
2006-Jan-07, 05:34 AM
Sounds like you just blew the Picture Tube, you should be able to get it repaired at your local manufacture. Contact the company and tell them what happened and see what they can do.

Hopes it helped.

Sticks
2006-Jan-07, 06:26 AM
Try the small add or second hand shops - you might find a newish one there that works for the couple of years.

Enzp
2006-Jan-07, 07:50 AM
I doubt it is the tube - or CRT, if you want to sound in the know. It doesn't sound simple. Your vertical line means you are losing horizontal sweep. it could be a simple broken solder connection which arcs over and maybe trips the safety shut-down. Or it could also be a number of other things that trip it. You could have trouble with your horizontal output transformer, aka "the flyback." Or a secondary circuit running from it. Then again it could be a problem in the power supply and some system integrated circuit is getting confused. Lots of things can trigger shut-down. Especially higher than expected voltages within.

There are a wide variety of circuit configurations in today's TV sets, even within one brand line such as SOny. My knowledge of them is cursory, so I cannot be more specific. Expect to pay a shop a couple hours labor plus who knows what for parts.

I'd say shop around for a good shop, but that is hard for the layman. One shop might charge less per hour, but have less skill at the task so they bill more hours. The higher rate shop might be cheaper. Or might not. Your friends' experiences with various shops might be a useful guide.

Parrothead
2006-Jan-07, 01:42 PM
I'd do a websearch of the tv model number and problem as well. It might give you an idea of the actual problem and any potential costs. The sound on my tv went suddenly a couple of weeks ago, during a search I found it was a common problem with that particular model.Turned out the fix was, as simple as, unplugging the tv for several hours.

DukePaul
2006-Jan-07, 04:47 PM
My nine yr old 35 inch Sony has progressively gotten worse over the past 2 months. On startup it cycles on and off for 3 minutes and the black background is instead a pale greyish green that slowly darkens but never to the black it use to have. The colors are off with faint greenish cast. I have decided on a 42 inch Panasonic plasma for its replacement but my problem is now I have this 100 kg+ old CRT tube monster to move and it almost killed me and a buddy of mine when I first moved it up the stairs in my house. My new TV only wears 30kg. I know most people have become blaise over flat panel technology but I think a 4 inch thick wide screen TV is cool.

Van Rijn
2006-Jan-07, 11:18 PM
Can anyone tell me what might be going on, and what I might expect to pay to have this fixed? I had hoped to keep this set at least another two years, but if it'll cost hundreds to fix, it won't be worth it.

With the level of integration these days, unless it is a simple fix, there is a very good chance it would cost more to fix than to go out and buy a new one. Given the age of the TV, I'd recommend you think very seriously about replacement. Because of the expertise required, repair is relatively expensive now. See how much it would cost for someone to look it over, but I wouldn't be expecting much.

LurchGS
2006-Jan-08, 02:30 AM
With the level of integration these days, unless it is a simple fix, there is a very good chance it would cost more to fix than to go out and buy a new one. Given the age of the TV, I'd recommend you think very seriously about replacement. Because of the expertise required, repair is relatively expensive now. See how much it would cost for someone to look it over, but I wouldn't be expecting much.

Exactly. Modern recreational appliances (stereo, tv, etc) are 'disposable' - you don't try to fix them outside of warranty. you replace them. I don't know, off hand, what a new 32 costs, but it's probably less than $200. I have one that I picked up for $50. Watchign it right now, in fact. (I get the good one, the kids have a choice of 21 inchers)
Hit yard sales, auctions, Salvation Army/Goodwill, e-bay...your friends...

Halcyon Dayz
2006-Jan-08, 04:21 AM
Considering the time we spend in front of them, TVs are dirt cheap.

beskeptical
2006-Jan-09, 09:49 AM
I'm thinking about turning this computer into our TV and getting another computer. The web casts are increasing by the day and TV programing is so limited.

Is anyone else looking into such a move?