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suntrack2
2006-Jan-07, 10:37 AM
we know the man is home-seek, and in space he may feals aloof and alone, may be the psychologycal control of brain reflects, may be some different kind of problems he is facing,

may be the nervousness come in the space, to avoid all it temporarily the space station structure must be home like, atleast for the mission period to feal the astronouts like they are living in the home and exprementing as per the assignments. is it possible.?

sunil

novaderrik
2006-Jan-07, 11:30 AM
sure. why not.

Spherical
2006-Jan-07, 12:09 PM
we know the man is home-seek, and in space he may feals aloof and alone, may be the psychologycal control of brain reflects, may be some different kind of problems he is facing,

may be the nervousness come in the space, to avoid all it temporarily the space station structure must be home like, atleast for the mission period to feal the astronouts like they are living in the home and exprementing as per the assignments. is it possible.?

sunil

Well, what you are setting as a requirement makes sense, but whether or not it is possible depends upon the station design. You cannot comfortably sit in a chair while in free-fall the way you can here on Earth. Nearly all of the appliances, fittings, and fixtures used in free-fall must be made differently for use in free-fall. Rigorous exercise is an absolute must rather than an option. The list of differences is fairly long, but a lot of them go away if you build a station that is large enough that it can be spun. That brings in a whole new set of problems because a spinning station has to be large, a mile or so in diameter.

It is also necessary to be very careful about the materials used inside any station. Fire aboard a space station is more dangerous than a fire aboard a submarine. This rules out the use of a great many materials we use here on the ground.

It is necessary to also be careful of emissions from materials. A great many adhesives and finishing materials, varnishes, lacquers, paints, and what have you, continue to emit volatile vapors over a long period of time. Even a great many woods emit volatiles over long periods and so do many plants. On Earth a lot of these materials are not problematical because we live in a great sea of air that dilutes them. In a space station or habitat, there is no large sea of air so such things must filtered or scrubbed out of the atmosphere.

Another problem is dust and short fibers. Many materials we use here on the ground without a second thought are completely unsuitable in space because friction will cause them to shed quantities of dust and short fibers into the station's atmosphere. So far, NASA has compiled four thick books of things to watch out for in station and spacecraft atmospheres.

You would be shocked, or perhaps not shocked, by the number of emissions human bodies alone contribute to closed-loop environments. And here I am not talking about the problems that arise with CO2. That's the simplest problem, albeit the most important one. Next on the list is excess moisture. Every time a person breaths, she or he also increases the humidity in closed environments. Third there are the aldehydes, ketones, and methane. Then there is the dust and short fiber problem. We shed a lot of hair and dander.

None of these problems are insoluble, but they are and will remain a thorn in the foot. There is no escape from maintanence.

Halcyon Dayz
2006-Jan-08, 01:16 PM
When missions get longer and longer, having an at-home
feeling to your surroundings might very well be beneficial.

http://www.cosgan.de/images/midi/haushalt/h070.gif

suntrack2
2006-Jan-08, 04:06 PM
that's good stuff, spherical.

Spherical
2006-Jan-08, 04:45 PM
that's good stuff, spherical.

Thank you, suntrack2, I hope you find it useful.